Movie Review: Deadpool

deadpool posterThe Merc with a Mouth finally comes to the big screen in Deadpool, based on the over saturated Marvel Comics character created by Rob Liefeld and given personality by Fabian Nicieza and later Joe Kelly.

How do I describe the 1 hour and 48 minutes? Take a Loony Tunes cartoon, throw some spandex, 80s action films, swear words, lots of over the top violence, and then have it do a few lines of coke, mix it all up, and you have Deadpool.

The story of the film isn’t anything special. Wade Wilson, played by Ryan Reynolds, undergoes a process in hopes to cure his cancer. The process is much more than it seems and turns him in to Deadpool. From there, it’s a revenge tale, that for some reason has some X-Men thrown in.

The film is completely on Reynolds shoulders, which makes sense since the actor has spent about a decade trying to make the film happen. If you enjoy is spins in Van Wilder, or Blade Trinity, the motor mouthed smart ass with a line for everything, you’ll enjoy his performance. It’s funny, it’s at times offensive, and it’s pretty quick witted. The film is one I want to see the out takes, because if this is what was left in, I can’t imagine what was left out and it’s pretty clear a lot of the lines were improvised.

The action for the film is over the top like expected, and there were things I had never seen before in a film, so it absolutely has that going for it. It’s a film that looks fantastic, using slow motion at just the right moments to emphasize the ludicrous visuals we see on the screen.

But where’s Deadpool without his supporting cast? T.J. Miller as Weasel is very entertaining, and much more subdued than I expected. Morena Baccarin as Wade’s love interest Vanessa is charming in the scenes she’s in, but she does little other than being a plot device, though she does give as much as she takes when it comes to quips. Leslie Uggams as Blind Al feels like she comes out of nowhere and is rather underused.

Where the movie fails is generally in its bad guys and guest stars. Ed Skrein as Ajax and Gina Carano as Angel Dust are the two bad guys and it’s never quite clear who they’re working for or the bigger picture. It’s all mentioned, but it’s rather silly, and feels like a set-up to just watch Deadpool kill people and be a smart ass. There’s no mention of Weapon X, which is a let down, though it can all easily be put in there in sequels if need be. Stefan Kapicic as Colossus just feels weird in the film and there’s clearly back story hinted at (can you say prequel?). The exception to all this is Brianna Hildebrand as Negasonic Teenage Warhead. Can we get more of her please? She stole the show in each scene she’s in.

Where the film truly wins is its not giving a fuck attitude. It breaks the fourth wall regularly and Reynolds has no issue with picking on himself and his past film work, which is great to see. The film as a whole picks on itself, its studio, its director, actors, the CGI, nothing is sacred and everything is game. A continuing joke is Reynolds himself, showing off the actors willingness to take punches as much as he can give them.

I went in expecting the worst, and came out wanting more. The film isn’t for kids, and while I find Deadpool beyond irritating in comics, here he’s beyond enjoyable. And it’s all due to Reynolds. He nails it, and the film nails it, in every way there is. If you found the marketing leading up to the film funny. If you want your superheroes a bit more violent, with a bit more swear words, and definitely not for kids, Deadpool is for you.

Overall Rating: 8.1

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