Tag Archives: x-men

Halloween ComicFest Gets an Exclusive White Queen Funko POP!

Marvel‘s Hellfire Club returns as Halloween ComicFest is proud to announce the release of the new Emma Frost Diamond Form PREVIEWS Exclusive (PX) Funko POP! Figure, available only during the event on Saturday, October 28th.

When the Sentinels attacked Genosha, X-Men’s Emma Frost found herself caught in the crossfire. When the X-Men cleared away the wreckage, they found her unharmed, a second mutation turned her body into an indestructible diamond form. In addition to being one of the world’s most powerful telepaths, she was the first to develop a secondary mutation.

This PREVIEWS Exclusive figure carries a suggested retail price of $11.99 and will only be available on Saturday, October 28th on Halloween ComicFest in extremely limited quantities.

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Pop! Home: Deadpool Mug in August

Put the tacos and chimichangas down and enjoy a delicious beverage.Your favorite wise-cracking mercenary

Your favorite wise-cracking mercenary now comes as a mug!

These Deadpool mugs come featured in Deadpool’s evil blue suit and X-Force uniform variant.

Take a sip of your favorite beverage from Deadpools head this summer!

Pop! Home: Deadpool Mug‘s are out in August from Funko.

 

 

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Get Iceman plus Jean Grey, Generation X, Cable, Weapon X, X-Men: Gold, and X-Men: Blue for Free

If you’ve missed Iceman and the other new X-Men titles, boy does Marvel have a deal for you! Get a FREE X-Men ResurrXion digital comics bundle today through tomorrow and start a New Era of X! Use code ICEMAN: www.marvel.com/redeem

Yes, you read right, get seven free comics for doing absolutely nothing.

Review: Iceman #2

In Iceman #2, Bobby survives an awkward Blackbird ride with his ex-girlfriend Kitty Pryde on a mission to save a power/technology altering powered mutant named Zachary from an angry mob outside a big box store. What he doesn’t survive is the presence of fill-in artists Edgar Salazar, Ibraim Roberson, and Ed Tadeo, who pinch hit for Alessandro Vitti after a single issue. Writer Sina Grace gets the highly awkward, yet very personal relationship between Kitty and Iceman along with his lack of seriousness, but is hamstrung by awful art. His jokes and dialogue land, but the art is stiff and forced. However, Rachelle Rosenberg uses varying tones of white to make it look like the angry mob is actually brushing ice and snow off their clothes.

For the second straight issue, Grace shows that he’s not concerned with continuity heavy epics or overarching plots. He tells simple standalone superhero stories that act as a vessel for him to explore coming out as an adult man. The main conflict of Iceman #2 isn’t rescuing Zachary from the suburban equivalent of peasants with pitchforks, but Kitty getting angry at Iceman for not telling her that he came out as gay. Sure, she’s been in space with the Guardians of the Galaxy for some time, but she had to find out from Goldballs.

When they aren’t bickering on the battlefield, Kitty is quite supportive of Iceman and says that he should talk to someone about what he’s going through instead of hiding his feelings beneath dad jokes and ice puns. Her suggestion is his parents, which opens up a whole can of worms about levels of supportiveness for families and their LGBTQ children. Kitty’s advice is sound, but a little contradictory of the first issue where Iceman considers the X-Men to be his family, and he shows an easy rapport in early scenes where he banters with Colossus and Storm while walking down the halls of the Xavier school for his mission. Even though editorial probably wouldn’t condone, Grace also misses an opportunity to explore Kitty Pryde’s bisexuality that has been hinted at by her creator, Chris Claremont, but has yet to be fully shown on the page. This is partially due to Jim Shooter’s homophobic editorial policies during the 1980s when she was introduced.

Some iffiness aside, Sina Grace definitely understands the character of Iceman and slowly digs into this transitional period in his life while not neglecting Bobby’s sense of humor and fun even at inopportune times. However, this tone isn’t matched in the art by Edgar Salazar, Ibraim Roberson, and Ed Tadeo in what I’m tempted to call a phone-in job. Both Kitty and Iceman have visually interesting powers, and Rachelle Rosenberg even uses stronger colors to show Zachary’s energy tampering abilities. However, with the exception of a cute scene featuring ice golems or where Iceman shoulder checks a town dweller, there is no motion or power to their moves. The Blackbird is taking a dive, but it’s just a suspended object and doesn’t feel like the end of the world. And Iceman and Kitty’s faces remain almost the same with slight ticks for fear and embarrassment. A biggish reveal of Kitty being Iceman’s co-pilots falls flat thanks to the rictus where her face should be. Salazar and Roberson look like they’re going for a 90s vibe with their figure, and there’s nothing wrong with nostalgia, but this doesn’t work with the sleeker uniform designs and Rosenberg’s color schemes. Both the scenes of action and conversation aren’t drawn well so there is no relief from generic faces or stiff poses although Salazar and Roberson are much better gesture artists than facial.

Written by a talented gay writer like Sina Grace, who isn’t afraid to unpack the messiness of Iceman’s coming out and personality while still letting him pose for selfies mid-battle, Iceman should be one of Marvel’s more compelling books. However, with its generic and uninspiring depiction of some of the flashiest (and soapiest) superheroes ever, Iceman pales in comparison to books that have a more distinct visual identity like America, Marvel’s other book with an LGBTQ lead.

Story: Sina Grace Pencils: Edgar Salazar, Ibraim Roberson
Inks: Ed Tadeo, Ibraim Roberson Colors: Rachelle Rosenberg

Story: 8.0 Art: 5.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: X-Men: Gold #6

X-Men: Gold #6

(W) Marc Guggenheim (A) R. B. Silva (CA) Ardian Syaf
Rated T+
In Shops: Jun 21, 2017
SRP: $3.99

• The perfect mutant-killing machine has MUTATED.
• As the X-Men fight for their lives against the most fearsome SENTINEL yet, one X-Man decides to do the unthinkable!
• Will it take the life of one X-Man to save the rest?

The One:12 Collective X-Men Deadpool Summer Exclusive

Wade Winston Wilson, known to the world as Deadpool, is a disfigured and mentally unstable mercenary with the superhuman ability of an accelerated healing factor and physical prowess.  He is presented here in his blue and yellow X-Men outfit. If you think it’s strange to see Wade Wilson in a X-Men outfit, then you are not alone because Deadpool thinks so too!  Deadpool tried on X-Men attire as a bet with Wolverine and Beast in the Cable and Deadpool comic series. Deadpool,decked out in his blue and yellow X-Men attire, joins the One:12 Collective with a comprehensively detailed outfit and portrait sculptures.

This limited edition Mezco Summer Exclusive is only available via their website and at the Mezco SDCC booth # 3445— while supplies last.

X-Men Deadpool joins the One:12 collective with a comprehensively detailed outfit and unique character specific accessories. The X-Men Deadpool One:12 Collective Summer Exclusive figure features:

  • Two head portraits
  • One:12 Collective body with  over 30 points of articulation
  • Hand painted authentic detailing
  • Over 16cm tall
  • Eight (8) interchangeable hands including
    – One (1) pair of fists (L & R)
    – One (1) pair of gun-holding hands (L & R)
    – One (1) pair of sword-holding hands (L & R)
    – One (1) grenade holding hand (R)
    – One (1) shaka / “hang loose” hand (L)

Costume:

  • Sculpted gloves on each hand
  • Vambrace on each forearm
  • Harness with sculpted pouches
  • Sculpted boots

Accessories:

  • One (1) machine gun with removable ammo clip and opening grenade chamber
  • Four (4) 40mm style grenades (fit in the grenade launcher chamber)
  • Four  (4) throwing grenades
  • One (1) katana with sheath
  • One (1) handgun with removable clip
  • One (1) One:12 Collective display base with logo
  • One (1) One:12 Collective adjustable display post

Each One:12 Collective X-Men Deadpool figure is packaged in a deluxe, collector friendly box, designed with collectors in mind, there are no twist ties for easy in and out of package display.

This Summer Exclusive The One:12 Collective X-Men Deadpool is only available through the Mezco Toyz website or the Mezco Toyz SDCC booth #3445. The figure is expected to ship July-September 2017.

An Astonishing New Look at Marvel’s X-Men Trading Card Variant Covers!

This July, mutants will once again assemble in Astonishing X-Men #1, and Marvel is celebrating the occasion with a series of nearly thirty X-Men Trading Card Variants by legendary artist Jim Lee! After debuting a selection of covers earlier this year, Marvel is proud to release the remaining variant covers of the full collection.

Remastered and recolored from the original trading cards, relive this iconic era of the Children of the Atom with a series of eye-popping covers celebrating your favorite characters. Originally penciled by legendary X-Men artist Jim Lee with inker Scott Williams, colorists such as Jesus Aburtov, Israel Silva & Chris Sotomayor apply modern coloring techniques to these classic masterpieces!

Look for all of these can’t-miss X-MEN TRADING CARD VARIANTS on your favorite Marvel titles, coming exclusively to comic shops throughout the month of July:

  1. ALL-NEW WOLVERINE #22 (Archangel)
  2. AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #30 (Bishop)
  3. AVENGERS #9 (Mystique)
  4. BLACK PANTHER #16 (Storm)
  5. CABLE #3 (Cable)
  6. CAPTAIN AMERICA: STEVE ROGERS #19 (Gambit)
  7. CHAMPIONS #10 (Cyclops)
  8. DAREDEVIL #23 (Domino)
  9. DEADPOOL #33 (Deadpool)
  10. DEFENDERS #3 (Shadow King)
  11. DOCTOR STRANGE #23 (Mr. Sinister)
  12. GENERATION X #4 (Jubilee)
  13. GWENPOOL, THE UNBELIEVABLE #18 (White Queen)
  14. INVINCIBLE IRON MAN #9 (Colossus)
  15. IRON FIST #5 (Sabretooth)
  16. JEAN GREY #4 (Dark Phoenix)
  17. MIGHTY THOR #21 (Sentinel)
  18. MS. MARVEL #20 (Lady Deathstrike)
  19. OLD MAN LOGAN #26 (Professor X)
  20. PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN #2 (Psylocke)
  21. THE PUNISHER #14 (Forge)
  22. ROYALS #5 (Magneto)
  23. SPIDER-MAN #18 (Shadowcat)
  24. THANOS #9 (Strong Guy)
  25. UNCANNY AVENGERS #25 (Rogue)
  26. VENOM #152 (Polaris)
  27. WEAPON X #5 (Warpath)
  28. X-MEN BLUE #7 (Jean Grey)
  29. X-MEN GOLD #7 (Mojo)

Review: Iceman #1

The adult version of Iceman gets a solo series thanks to the talented team of writer Sina Grace (Self-Obsessed), artist Alessandro Vitti (Secret Warriors), and colorist Rachelle Rosenberg. It’s also the first Marvel comic to feature a queer male superhero as the protagonist in quite some time as the House of Bi Erasure decides to throw us a bone for Pride Month. For the most part, Iceman #1 is a breezy read with banter and creative action, but there is a real sadness to its core as Bobby’s parents still haven’t come to terms with him being both gay and a mutant. Grace makes his relationship with them complicated because they aren’t complete bigots like the one-dimensional bad guy that he fights this issue. These kind of nuanced conversations are one of the benefits of having an actual gay man write this title.

Iceman #1 reads like a companion to the memorable and authentic (Thanks to the coaching of Ian McKellen and directing of Bryan Singer.) “coming out” scene between Bobby and his parents in the 2003 film X2.  For the most part, the LGBTQ subtext of X2 is text in Iceman even though Grace and Vitti stop short of Bobby and his parents having a conversation about his sexuality with a battle against the anti-mutant, football helmet wearing terrorist, Purifier interrupting their chat. It’s nice to see Bobby banter with his parents about his ice slides and his mom’s copyright friendly version of a Bed, Bath, and Beyond addiction, but then find out that they didn’t tell him they were moving. Also, they kind of sweep his sexuality under the rug, and Vitti zooms in on the downcast expression on Bobby’s face when his mom asks about his “girlfriends”.

Their interactions are a little emotional because of his dad’s pericarditis, friendly, and a little bit awkward. When their child comes out, parents sometimes aren’t completely bigoted (Kicking you out of the house) or accepting. (Hugs all around). A lot of times they are somewhere in between. This has been my own personal experience, and it’s nice to see Sina Grace and Alessandro Vitti reflect it in a superhero comic. To go with the uncomfortable nature of Iceman discussing his sexuality and mutant status, there is the fact that his high adventure lifestyle as a superhero has caused him to drift apart from his parents. Iceman is busy saving the day and traveling the globe and multiple dimensions so he doesn’t really have time for weekend visits. He’s growing up and coming into his own as a superhero and man, but that means leaving his childhood behind. But Grace still writes him being goofy as hell, and the comic ends on an emoji.

Alessandro Vitti throws away the notion that superhero art has to be cleanly inked and penciled in his work on Iceman #1. In keeping with the improvisational nature of Iceman’s powers, it looks like subzero jazz with plenty of speed lines during fight scenes before slowing down and being more expressive during serious scenes, like when Bobby sees his parents in the hospital. To go with his art, Rachelle Rosenberg uses a palette that Andre 3000 would describe as “cooler than being cool”, and you can feel the temperature drop when Iceman uses abilities. But there are subtle differences in how the ice looks like a more playful snowball/slushie feel when the Icemen are sparring in the Danger Room versus a harder/freeze you in carbonite color for when he surrounds the Purifier in a pointy ice cave.

Even though its bad guy is one note, and an ongoing threat isn’t built up, Iceman #1 is a successful start to the adult Bobby Drake’s solo debut. Sina Grace’s dialogue has a silly sense of humor just like Iceman has had since the Jack Kirby and Stan Lee days, and it’s nice to have an X-book with more of a slice of life-meets-cool superpowers vibe instead of being steeped in continuity, nostalgia, and/or edginess. Plus Alessandro Vitti and Rachelle Rosenberg realize that Iceman can pretty much shape matter to his will and use this as a license to let their creativity to run wild.

It’s super fun to see Bobby Drake kick ass and crack dad jokes while struggling with dating and his relationships with friends and family as a newly out adult gay man in Iceman #1.

Story: Sina Grace Art: Alessandro Vitti Colors: Rachelle Rosenberg
Story: 7.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

A First Look at Marvel Dice Masters: X-Men First Class

WizKids has released a first look at WizKidsDice Masters set, Marvel Dice Masters: X-Men First Class. This September, the set brings more mutants to the tabletop for Dice Masters action. The 124-card expansion features multiple rosters of X-Men, the Exiles, and the Brotherhood of Mutants.

The X-Men have been featured in numerous sets either as the main focus or as teams within. Sets with a primary focus on X-men include Avengers vs. X-Men, Deadpool, and Uncanny X-Men

The set is focused on spinning character dice up and down to manipulate abilities and strength. There’s also new keywords:

Awaken – lets you damage your opponent, reroll opposing characters, or get an attack boost by spinning up to a higher level.

Professor X: Peaceful Coexistence allows players to spin all X-Men-affiliated dice up one level at the start of their turn. Cyclops and Iceman both have the Awaken keyword. Cyclops: Boy Scout may deal three damage to a target character when his character die is spun up, while Iceman: Cold Hands, Warm Heart doubles his attack value.

Thunderbird: Warrior of the Apache will allow you to spin up all your characters when he’s KO’d. If Sunfire: Moeagaru! is also on your team, his Awaken ability will activate giving him +1A and +1D. Storm: Misspent Youth allows a player to prep a die from their bag whenever a Storm die spins up a level.

Infiltratelets you deal direct damage with “while active” abilities.

Magneto: The House of M grants all Brotherhood characters the keyword. Blob: Appetite for Destruction has the ability to prevent an opponent from both purchasing and fielding dice from a chosen card, and Scarlet Witch: Careful What You Wish For can force an opponent to twice roll an Action face before they can use it.

But Infiltrate isn’t just for the Brotherhood, the Exiles have it too.

Blink: Unhinged from Reality gains Infiltrate whenever a player uses an Action die. Mimic: Borrowed Talent allows a player to copy the A and D of a character and Prep two dice anytime that character is fielded, while Morph: Change of Heart can use the effects of a Basic Action Card while attacking.

The set also sees the debut of Thunderbird, Sunfire, Banshee, Doop, Onslaught, Boom Boom, Jubilee, and more!

(via Game Trade Magazine)

The Gifted: When You Find Yourself In A Different World

Don’t miss the series premiere of the all-new FOX show, The Gifted, this fall!

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