Tag Archives: tuttle publishing

Haruki Murakami: Manga Stories is an interesting collection of four manga stories

Haruki Murakami‘s stories in graphic novel form for the first time!

Haruki Murakami’s novels, essays and short stories have sold millions of copies worldwide and been translated into dozens of languages. Now for the first time, many of Murakami’s best-loved short stories are available in graphic novel form in English. Haruki Murakami Manga Stories 1 is the first of three volumes, which will present a total of 9 short stories from Murakami’s bestselling collections.

Story: Haruki Murakami
Art: Pmgl
Adapted by: JC Deveney

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW
Bookshop
Amazon
Kindle


Tuttle Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Haruki Murakami: Manga Stories is an interesting collection of four manga stories

Haruki Murakami‘s stories in graphic novel form for the first time!

Haruki Murakami’s novels, essays and short stories have sold millions of copies worldwide and been translated into dozens of languages. Now for the first time, many of Murakami’s best-loved short stories are available in graphic novel form in English. Haruki Murakami Manga Stories 1 is the first of three volumes, which will present a total of 9 short stories from Murakami’s bestselling collections.

Story: Haruki Murakami
Art: Pmgl
Adapted by: JC Deveney

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW
Bookshop
Amazon
Kindle


Tuttle Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

The World of Andong Agimat: The Mystery of the Talisman is interesting

Follow Andong as he uncovers this violent cult’s scheme, which threatens the very balance of the world. He trudges through the underbelly of Manila, teaming up with old friends, and even old rivals, to put an end to this cult’s evil plans. Can Andong Agimat and his talisman’s secret powers repel the forces of chaos?

Story: Arnold Arre
Art: Arnold Arre

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Bookshop
Amazon
Kindle


Tuttle Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Muros Within Magical Walls – The Case of the Cemetery Girl is a detective story with a magical spin

An intrepid detective tracks a girl lost amidst Manila’s many temptations. Can he crack the case and find the girl before the city erupts into violence?

Story: Paolo Chikiamco
Art: Borg Sinaban

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Bookshop
Amazon
Kindle


Tuttle Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Animal Castle Vol. 2 #1

Wednesdays (and Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Animal Castle Vol. 2 #1 (Ablaze) – A really interesting new take on the classic book Animal Farm.

Astrobots #1 (Massive/Whatnot) – The art for this looks amazing and is about machine lifeforms called Astrobots who scout worlds for humanity and one world where a society of them is rising and humankind is not included in their plans.

Carnage Reigns Alpha #1/Cult of Carnage: Misery #1/Edge of Spider-Verse #1 (Marvel) – There’s a lot going on the fans of Marvel’s Spider-Man corner of their universe. There’s more multiverse action to enjoy and Carnage faces off against Miles Morales!

Hairball #2 (Dark Horse) – As the young girl’s black cat continues to plague her family with horror and tragedy, she decides she must take matters into her own hands to put an end to the feline’s evil ways. The first issue was some impressive an unnerving horror.

History of Japan in Manga (Tuttle Publishing) – The History of Japan in Manga tells the action-packed saga of Japan from its misty origins up to the present day.

Impossible People: A Completely Average Recovery Story (Black Dog & Leventhal) – Julia Wertz chronicles her haphazard attempts at sobriety and the relentlessly challenging, surprisingly funny, and occasionally absurd cycle of addiction and recovery.

Lamentation #1 (Oni Press) – New horror from Cullen Bunn, Hillary Jenkins, and Simon Bowland? Yes please!

Monomyth #1 (Mad Cave Studios) – Magic is all but extinct. When the last ailing wizard casts a final desperate spell to summon the descendants of ancient bloodlines to a school for magic now in disrepair…those chosen ones find a horror of the likes they’ve never experienced. The concept sounds great.

Parker Girls #7 (Abstract Studios) – Every issue has been a great mix of humor and action.

Peacemaker: Tries Hard #1 (DC Comics) – Peacemaker is asked to help steal the world’s most valuable and dangerous DNA!

Shazam #1 (DC Comics) – Mark Waid and Dan Mora taking on Shazam!. Nuff said.

Starsigns #1 (Image Comics) – The constellations of the zodiac fall to earth, granting twelve ordinary people from very different walks of life the superhuman powers of the Starsigns. The concept sounds interesting with a astrology meets X-Men/Heroes spin.

Survival #1 (Dark Horse) – A plane crash leads to a creature bringing ancient terror to the Alaska wilderness.

Where Monsters Lie #4 (Dark Horse) – The series has been fantastic with a mix of a lot of laughs and over-the-top violence.

X-Men: Before the Fall – Sons of X #1 (Marvel) – A series of one-shots kick off with this one seeing Legion taking on Nimrod and more moves from Mother Righteous.

Review: Tokyo Rose: Zero Hour

Tokyo Rose: Zero Hour

When I was in the Navy, every time we would cross the Suez Canal the craziest radio message would come across the line. There was something called “the Filipino Money”, a character meant to provide some comic relief in what would normally be a monotonous job. The first few times we would hear it, it was funny. The next few times, not so much, as it dawned on me it was a racist mocking of the way Filipinos talked.

Back then, when you were the only one, it’s difficult to speak up when you think it was wrong. In many cases it still is difficult. As history will tell us, the purpose of these type of voiceovers is psychological warfare meant to deter enemy combatants. Vietnam War veterans remember Vietcong radio imploring soldiers to put down their weapons, In Tokyo Rose: Zero Hour, we get the true story of one of the most famous of these real life characters.

We open up on the trial of Iva Toguri, who is infamously known as the Tokyo Rose, as she begin tried for treason but her story is much more complicated. We are taken back 8 years earlier to July 5, 1941 where Iva and her family are taking a ship to visit relatives in Japan, on what was meant to be a family trip back to her parents home., where she would stay with relatives for four months, but right when she thinks coming home would be easy, she finds out how much red tape is involved.  As she waits for the paperwork to go through, it so happens that the massacre at Pearl Harbor happens,  she gets recruited by the Japanese government’s thought police  to join their ranks while her family back home in America gets put in internment camps.  Meanwhile, Iva is forced to give up her American citizenship and join a news program called “Zero Hour”, which would use “Niseis” like her. The show is run by 2 prisoners of war, Major Cousens and Lt. Reyes, who use the broadcast show to subvert the message the Japanese military wanted to send to Allied troops . Eventually, their plan was found by a Master Sergeant, right after Major Cousens suffers a heart attack but fortune favors them, as the US Troops begin their occupation of Japan, giving those who have been oppressed like Iva, hope. A newspaper even wants to interview her and promises to pay for it, but when the editor refused to do because of antiwar sentiment, they concoct a plan to get her arrested for treason and put on trial. As the US Attorney tries to prove that she was the Tokyo Rose, they bring in bought and paid witnesses ,which is good thing Lt Reyes, who is now her husband and Major Cousens show up to testify on her behalf. She would be eventually have all 8 acts of treason dismissed with the exception of her doing the job she had been hired for, where she would serve 10 years in jail for it. By the graphic novel’s end, we catch up with Iva 57 years later in Chicago where president Ford finally gives her a well deserved pardon.

Overall, Tokyo Rose: Zero Hour is a heartbreaking story of one woman whose agency was taken away by two countries she called home, only to find a small semblance of justice many years later. The story by Frattino is harrowing. The art by the creative team is gorgeous. Altogether, a wartime legend whose story finally gets told in the light it deserves.

Story: Andre Frattino Art: Kate Kasenow
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Tuttle Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: BookshopAmazonKindle

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

The Closet #1

Wednesdays (and Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

After Lambana: Myth and Magic in Manila (Tuttle Publishing) – It’s a graphic novel focused on Filipino myth, magic, and supernatural suspense!

Bikini Atoll (Clover Press) – A danger in the water story just in time for summer!

The Closet #1 (Image Comics) – Writer James Tynion IV has been killing it lately so just his name on this tale of existential horror has us intrigued.

Justice League: Road to Dark Crisis (DC Comics) – The opening chapter of DC’s next big events was so-so, but we’re still intrigued by this one-shot comic that fives us a world where the Justice League is gone.

Neverender #1 (Behemoth Comics) – At the edge of civilization the dominant sport is a civilized sword duel to the death.

Newthink #1 (AWA Studios) – This anthology examines the rapid proliferation of technology, the cultural and political polarization of the country, and the technocrats that have driven us to such extremes of thought that we need to present the present as something…futuristic.

The Nice House on the Lake #9 (DC Comics/DC Black Label) – We’ve been loving this series that has us guessing as to what exactly is going on and where it’s going.

Phalanx (Image Comics) – Image is celebrating 30 years and this one-shot that seems to be having fun with the Image of old feels like it’d be nostalgic fun.

Shadow War: Omega (DC Comics) – The finale to the mini-event that will lead directly into DC’s next big summer event.

Triskele #1 (Scout Comics) – When young Alec Ellis is granted a magical gift on Samhain night, the scales of power on the island of Albion are inadvertently shifted.

Review: Diary of a Tokyo Teen

Diary of a Tokyo Teen

If your parents are from a different country, your existence somehow feels incomplete until you have been where they came from. Throughout popular culture, there has always been some iteration of what happens when one comes home. In one of Billy Crystal’s stand-up specials for HBO, he went back to his grandparents’ Russia, which was both heartfelt and hilarious. One of my all-time favorite versions of this story was in the book and movie The Namesake.

It was a movie that is heartbreaking to watch now because it’s too close to home but gave readers and viewers what it means to live in that “hyphen.” The main character struggled at first with his name and eventually his identity. It wasn’t until he went to where his parents grew up, that his struggle became even more visceral. In Christine Mari Inzer’s Diary Of A Tokyo Teen, we find a Japanese American girl whose visit to the place where her mother was born becomes a series of adventures.     

We meet the author right before she is set to stay with her grandparents in the summer of 2013, as it was her first trip without her parents. As she arrives in Japan, her grandmother, whom she affectionately calls Baba, greets her and the first thing she wants to do is to go to her favorite burger chain, Mos Burger, one which she exclaims is the best burger in the world. Soon after arriving, she goes shopping with her Baba, and realizes that everyone there is fashion-forward making her the odd duck.  She also meets her cousins, Karen, and Taiga, who are both fluent in Japanese, making Christine even more of an outsider. What becomes the centerpiece of the book is her observations of popular culture, from the different television shows to high tech toilet, and even a store only sells condoms. As some of these places, she experiences “ vuja de”, seeing the same experiences, places, and people through different eyes and are completely different involvements, as her memory of when she saw it with her mother and now as she travels by herself, reinforces the fact she still is just a kid. As her time there with her Baba, experiencing everything Japan has to offer, has been transcendental. Even when her family comes, her time there becomes even more genuine.

Overall, a relatable graphic novel that is sure to connect with any reader of any age. The stories by Inzer are funny, sad, and relatable. The art by Inzer is beautiful. Altogether, a book which gives a tourist view of Japan while accomplishing that all-important “search for self”.

Story: Christine Mari Inzer Art: Christine Mari Inzer
Story: 10 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.4 Recommendation: Buy