Tag Archives: the Hood

Search for Hu banner ad

Super-Articulate: Marvel Legends Bring on the Bad Guys!

Hey! I know it’s out of order! And late!

Here’s the deal: I actually got the previously reviewed Iron Man/Ursa Major BAF wave ahead of completing the Bad Guys/Xemnu BAF assortment. Also, I live in Indiana, which is seemingly the last place to get anything that isn’t basketball. At any rate, it resulted in a situation where some venues got their Bad Guys weeks ago, and I didn’t complete mine that long ago. Plus, it’s been a little crazy over here for other writing and life reasons, none of which would interest you that much (except for maybe the inter-company crossover I wrote that I can’t talk about yet). Therefore, with no further delay, Bring on the Bad Guys!

Overview: I previously said that the Ursa Major wave was my favorite of the year. I think it’s now duking it out with this one. Eight (counting Xemnu) classic comic villains, some of whom have never been done before, and a couple of whom that have never been done before in their classic style for Marvel Legends, would have been an automatic get for me anyway. But the design team really outdid themselves here. There are great flourishes for each figure and some excellent accessories.

The Hood: I’m going to start with the much maligned Hood. First off, you guys must secretly love him if you’ve made him the star of memes without end. And I’ll give you, the face sculpt is an odd choice. His expression is that of a man that just stepped in a bear trap. But I’m honestly just happy that The Hood finally exists. Parker Robbins was a major villainous presence in the Marvel Universe for much of the 2000s, appearing in or impacting events like Secret Invasion, Dark Reign, Siege, and the Heroic Age.

I feel like the figure gets a number of things right, but I do think it’s a touch short for the length of the, well, hood. The pistols and their effects turned out really well, and I think that it’s great to have the character alongside members of the crew he assembled in comics. I don’t think it’s bad, but it’s a solid okay.

Red Skull: Okay, there’s no question for me. Of the two heads that come with this figure, it’s the smile version all the way. There’s some serious Kirby/Erik Larsen energy in that leer. I love it. Remarkably, this is the first time that the Skull has been depicted in figure form in the straight-up green Hydra costume. This is indeed a very classic Skull, and the sculptors nailed it.

In terms of accessories, I have to give a hat tip to whomever decided to make the grasping hand big enough to really grip the Cosmic Cube. That makes a ton of difference in posing, and opens up other options. The pistol looks perfect for this version of the character as well. The new Skull is pretty striking, and of all the different versions (including Iron Skull, Red Onslaught, etc.), this is my favorite.

Arcade: IT’S ABOUT TIME. Think of all the times that Arcade has appeared in Marvel video game media alone! That original X-Men PC game, Ultimate Alliance, etc.? And Arcade has figured into some truly memorable storylines; there’s his first appearance, his team up with Dr. Doom (Doombot, whatever), Avengers Arena. It’s crazy to think that there has NEVER been an Arcade figure. This is a huge character choice win. As far as the design, I think it’s great. It’s an extra mile figure, too, in terms of detail. Look at the lifts in his shoes. Check out the number of tiny paint apps here. The extra head (with the Arena look) is a welcome surprise. He looks so good, it makes me want to build death traps for my X-Men. Well done.

A.I.M. Scientist Supreme: This was the figure that I was least sure of, but I love this guy. It’s just a terrific realization of the overall look of one of my favorite costumes in comics: the A.I.M. “beekeeper suit.” But the great bits are how the figure incorporates the modernized elements of the look. The shiny finish, the belt, the joints . . . all look especially good. I really enjoy how poseable the head is, making it easy for the Scientist Supreme to look at his data pad and despair how much repeated Avengers ass-kickings are costing them. Sometimes, it’s just the look, y’know. This one just looks great.

Dormammu: I’ve always thought that the SDCC Exclusive “Book of the Vishanti” Dormammu was well done, and it still looked good when it reappeared as a BAF. However, I’d always wanted the classic look. The first book that I recall owning that included Dormammu was Marvel Feature #2, starring The Defenders. While this look isn’t exactly the same as that one, it’s the idea that I have when I picture classic Dormammu. Like Red Skull, I feel like this is a fairly definitive take on the comic version of the figure. That maniacal face sculpt just puts it over the top.

Lady Deathstrike: The Marvel Legends line had an early Lady Deathstrike and it, well, had some problems. Notably: the arms with the mechanical extrusions which drastically limited poseability. However, this one is just excellent. It’s one of those instances where it looks like it was just peeled off the page. And this is definitely a figure that benefits from updated and added poseability. It’s like night and day to the original version. The billowy sleeves are a nice touch, but it’s the outstanding hand sculpts and the vastly improved face that really make it.

Doctor Doom (Secret Wars): God Emperor Doom! Secret Wars was a sprawling story filled with some memorable scenes (not the least of which was an Infinity Gauntlet-wielding Black Panther and Sub-Mariner teaming up), but one of the stand-outs was Doom’s utter demolition of Thanos. If you’re into Mortal Kombat-fatality homages, this figure is for you. In what has to be one of the grossest and most hilarious accessories in ML history, Doom comes with the spinal column and skull of Thanos. It’s tremendous. As for Doom himself, the look is great, the finish is solid, and the eyes are very well done. However, I have seen some reports that the figure is fragile on the underside, so be careful with your leg posing. I wouldn’t say this is necessary for the casual fan that has other recent Dooms, but it’s a solid pick-up for the deep bench collector.

Xemnu BAF: Never in a million years did I think we’d see a BAF of Xemnu the Titan! The long-time Hulk antagonist was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby in 1962, and he’s popped up a number of times over the years, including in The Immortal Hulk. I know that some were disappointed that this BAF was a more obscure character, but not me. I’m a huge fan of the “Universe” aspect of Marvel Legends, so any new inclusion is fine by me. It also makes sense to repurpose parts (like from Sasquatch) when the need arises. And honestly, I just love the look of it. Plus, we can always use more huge bad guys, right? I find this to be an extremely fun figure, and I’m glad they used the BAF slot on it.

Marvel’s Villains Get the Spotlight with Hasbro’s Marvel Legends

MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH DR. DOOM Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $19.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans, collectors, and kids alike can enjoy this MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH DR. DOOM Figure, inspired by the character from MARVEL entertainment. This quality 6-inch-scale figure features premium design, detail, and multiple points of articulation for posing and display in a MARVEL collection. Includes figure and 4 accessories. Available for pre-order at Hasbro Pulse, Amazon, Big Bad Toy Store, and Entertainment Earth.

MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH-SCALE DORMAMMU Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $19.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans, collectors, and kids alike can enjoy this MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH-SCALE DORMAMMU Figure, inspired by the character from MARVEL entertainment. This quality 6-inch-scale figure features premium design, detail, and multiple points of articulation for posing and display in a MARVEL collection. Includes figure and 6 accessories. Available for pre-order at Hasbro Pulse, Amazon, Big Bad Toy Store, and Entertainment Earth.

MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH MARVEL’S THE HOOD Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $19.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans, collectors, and kids alike can enjoy this MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH MARVEL’S THE HOOD Figure, inspired by the character from MARVEL entertainment. This quality 6-inch-scale figure features premium design, detail, and multiple points of articulation for posing and display in a MARVEL collection. Includes figure and 4 accessories. Available for pre-order at Hasbro Pulse, Amazon, Big Bad Toy Store, and Entertainment Earth.

MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH LADY DEATHSTRIKE Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $19.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans, collectors, and kids alike can enjoy this MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH LADY DEATHSTRIKE Figure, inspired by the character from MARVEL entertainment. This quality 6-inch-scale figure features premium design, detail, and multiple points of articulation for posing and display in a MARVEL collection. Available for pre-order at Hasbro Pulse, Amazon, Big Bad Toy Store, and Entertainment Earth.

MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH MARVEL’S ARCADE Figure

 (HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $19.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans, collectors, and kids alike can enjoy this MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH MARVEL’S ARCADE Figure, inspired by the character from MARVEL entertainment. This quality 6-inch-scale figure features premium design, detail, and multiple points of articulation for posing and display in a MARVEL collection. Includes figure and 2 accessories. Available for pre-order at Hasbro Pulse, Amazon, Big Bad Toy Store, and Entertainment Earth.

MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH A.I.M SCIENTIST SUPREME Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $19.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans, collectors, and kids alike can enjoy this MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH A.I.M SCIENTIST SUPREME Figure, inspired by the character from MARVEL entertainment. This quality 6-inch-scale figure features premium design, detail, and multiple points of articulation for posing and display in a MARVEL collection. Includes figure and accessory. Available for pre-order at Hasbro Pulse, Amazon, Big Bad Toy Store, and Entertainment Earth.

MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH RED SKULL Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $19.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans, collectors, and kids alike can enjoy this MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH RED SKULL Figure, inspired by the character from MARVEL entertainment. This quality 6-inch-scale figure features premium design, detail, and multiple points of articulation for posing and display in a MARVEL collection. Includes figure and 7 accessories. Available for pre-order at Hasbro Pulse, Amazon, Big Bad Toy Store, and Entertainment Earth.

The Marvel Legends Villains wave features a Xemnu build-a-figure.

Catching Up on Reviews, Part 5 — Avengers Academy and Captain America

Avengers Academy #9 (Marvel) – I love the storyline here where Finesse might turn out to be the daughter of the Taskmaster, one of my favorite Marvel anti-heroes these days. Less well-done are the parts of the issue dealing with Tigra expelling Academy members for assaulting the Hood. The art isn’t particularly great, either.

Story: 7 Art: 6.5 Overall: 6.75

Avengers Academy #10 (Marvel) – Sean Chen’s art is a step up from the previous issue and the storyline where Leech comes to give Hazmat a day as a normal kid is great. The best part of the issue is Speedball’s growth as a character and the burying of some of his Stamford demons, which is a long time coming.

Story: 8.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8

Avengers Academy #11 (Marvel) – Christos Gage writes a good connection to Avengers past by bringing back Korvac for this story arc. I’m a little annoyed at the flood of Thor movie tie-ins, though this one takes a different route than most. Tom Raney’s art is good, but not spectacular.

Story: 8 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.75

Avengers Academy #12 (Marvel) – There are moments of very strong writing here. The concept of bringing the future selves of the Academy students back to inhabit their present bodies so they can beat Korvac is an awesome device. The story is also fleshed out by one character showing a glaring weakness and two others showing a surprising vulnerability.

Story: 8.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8

Avengers Academy #13 (Marvel) – I guess I get what they were going after with the idea of the “Superhero Prom” for the students, having an issue that focuses more on the characters and the lighter side of their lives instead of action, I’m just not sure how well it works in this case.

Story: 7 Art: 7 Overall: 7

Avengers Academy #14 (Marvel) – I love the way the new incarnation of the Sinister Six is being used and this is another good appearance for them. It’s good to learn more about Dr. Octopus’s character than we have learned in the past, he’s on the verge of being a little over-exposed lately, but certainly not in Deadpool, Spidey or Wolverine territory.

Story: 8 Art: 7 Overall: 7.5

Avengers Academy #14.1 (Marvel) – Ruby is one of the dumbest characters in Marvel history and her presence here detracts from what is otherwise a really good story, focusing on one of the characters who didn’t join the Academy and his tempting offer to the would-be heroes.

Story: 8.5 Art: 7 Overall: 7.75

Avengers Academy #15 (Marvel) – This is Tom Raney’s best art yet and the Fear Itself tie-in works better than most of the others. This story also does a good job of tying in recent themes from the Academy books to Fear Itself, something a lot of the other tie-ins have failed to do.

Story: 8.5 Art: 8 Overall: 8.25

Avengers Academy Giant-Size #1 (Marvel) – Cartoonish art (which isn’t my taste at all) and a retread Arcade storyline with only a few interesting elements makes this issue a waste.

Story: 6.5 Art: 6 Overall: 6.25

Captain America #615.1 (Marvel) – Mitch Breitweiser’s art isn’t my favorite, it seems he has a real problem making people’s faces look realistic (even comic realistic). Other than that, Ed Brubaker’s tale is action-packed and compelling, even if, once again, it relies a bit much on World War II elements in telling the tale of Steve Rogers.

Story: 9 Art: 7 Overall: 8

Captain America #616 (Marvel) – This massive 70th anniversary issue is packed with stories, most of the well-told. The best is probably Brubaker and Mike Deodato’s Winter Soldier gulag tale, the worst is the Mike Benson and Paul Grist Baron Blood/Captain Ameica used to be a vampire story.

Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8

Captain America #617 (Marvel) – The continuation of the story of Bucky being put into a Russian gulag is entertaining and action-packed, but I read it after I knew Bucky’s eventual fate already, so I wonder how effective it is considering that context.

Story: 7.5 Art: 8 Overall: 7.75

Captain America #618 (Marvel) – The different artists used here vary greatly in quality, but the overall ongoing story is still a compelling one that has an impact on the future of Marvel comics, so it’s well worth the read.

Story: 8 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.75

Captain America #619 (Marvel) – The art from the gulag section is still the best in the issue, and it takes chances and mostly succeeds. The overall storyline comes to what appears to be a satisfying end.

Story: 7.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.75

Captain America #1 (Marvel) – Ah, the good-old Marvel pointless renumbering trick. The worst part about that for this issue is that this really isn’t good enough to be a first issue. It doesn’t break any new ground with the character and simply rehashes things we already know while mixing in a few newly-retconned storylines that don’t let us know anything new about Cap. It is good, I guess, to see Steve Rogers fully as Cap again, but you’d think that for a first issue, they would’ve had more of a point than what this issue has.

Story: 7 Art: 8 Overall: 7.5

Catching Up on Reviews, Part 2 — Avengers & Avengers Children’s Crusade (quinnelk)

Bookmark and Share

Avengers: The Children’s Crusade – Young Avengers (Marvel) – This is a very well-drawn comic book. I’m always a fan of Alan Davis’s work and this is some of the best stuff he’s done. The story is good as well, and ends with a good cliffhanger that draws you into the too-long delayed Children’s Crusade story.

Story: 8.5 Art: 10 Overall: 9.25

Avengers: The Children’s Crusade #5 (Marvel) – Jim Cheung’s art is pretty amazing in this issue and the series is one of the most important things Marvel is doing right now in terms of their continuity and history. A bit of this story is deus ex machina-like and the delays on this series are mind-numbing, but they are delivering quality material when they get around to it.

Story: 9 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.25

Avengers: The Children’s Crusade #6 (Marvel) – Cheung’s art continues to be amongst the best that Marvel is putting out these days and Allan Heinberg deftly delivers a story that is years in the making and, with the character of Richter, gives us one of the best payoffs in recent Marvel history. I would love it if this series were delivered more frequently, but if the quality continues to be this good, they can deliver it whenever they want.

Story: 9.75 Art: 9.75 Overall: 9.75

The Avengers #10 (Marvel) – John Romita Jr. and Brian Michael Bendis are amongst the best ever at what they do and issues like this are the proof. Every panel is beautiful and the story is even better. The Avengers series seems to be the only comic that really lived up to the concept of “The Heroic Age,” offering great heroes vs. villains storylines wherein the action is epic, the stories are straightforward and it’s easy to figure out who to root for. This issue is particularly amazing because Bendis changes storytelling styles multiple times throughout the issue without losing coherence and while still having room for cool pop culture references, a deft handling of a massive cast and a knowledge of and reverence to comics history while still adding something to the conversation. This is why I read comics.

Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10

The Avengers #11 (Marvel) – This is a battle-heavy issue and that means the story and the art suffer a little, but it’s still among the best comics being published these days.

Story: 9.75 Art: 9.75 Overall: 9.75

The Avengers #12 (Marvel) – Massive Marvel action with cosmic implications and good twists and references to the last half-decade of Marvel chronology and a clear growth of the characters involved. Also, the panel of Red Hulk punching the Hood is one of my favorite panels in recent years and I’d definitely buy that poster.

Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10

The Avengers #12.1 (Marvel) – Brian Hitch is a pretty good artist, but he’s no John Romita Jr. That being said, he does have a few great panels here to go along with continuing great writing by Bendis that pulls more nuggets out of continuity and adds good stuff for the long-time fans.

Story: 9.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 9

The Avengers #13 (Marvel) – Chris Bachalo brings a completely different style to the art for this issue and it works very, very well with Bendis’s different style of storytelling here, that is much more based on a collective narrative of the various Avengers. Both approaches work and the compliment each other well.

Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.75

The Avengers #14 (Marvel) – This is almost certainly the best Fear Itself tie-in issue from any series. Romita Jr. is back and he seems to have a particular knack, these days, of drawing Red Hulk hitting people and getting hit and making it look amazing. Bendis does his alternating style here, where some sequences are completely devoid of dialog and others are incredibly dialog-heavy and based on a collective narrative. It’s a great sign of his talent that both are equally effective at achieving different aspects of storytelling.

Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10

Almost American