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Missed San Diego Comic-Con? The Comic Books Has You Covered

The Comic Books has done it again with lots of coverage of San Diego Comic-Con 2018. You can check out lots of panels below!

San Diego Comic Con 2018 (July 18 – 22) 26 Photos



Maggie Thompson Spotlight: The Comics Buyers Guide (40:51, 37.4mb)
On the panel was Maggie Thompson, Mark Evanier, Scott Brick and R.C. Harvey. Maggie described the origin and the ending of The Comics Buyers Guide. Mark Evanier spoke about why he started and stopped writing for CBG. Maggie told a story about proposing a book of Mark Evanier columns and the shocking reason they turned it down. R. C. Harvey talked about his involvement with the magazine. Scott discussed writing comic history articles for CBG. It was also revealed that Scott wrote the most popular article the magazine had and that was about who added the ‘snap’ sound effect to Gwen Stacy’s fall, killing her. Maggie revealed the effort to save the CBG archives from the dumpster. Maggie and R.C Harvey told stories about Steve Ditko. Finally, they talked about digitizing CBG and putting them online.



20 Years of About Comics (52:00, 47.6mb)
The panelists were Nat Gertler, Lea Hernandez, Andrew Farago, Scott McCloud and Jim MacQuarrie. Nat spoke about why he got into publishing, who some of the early creators he publish were and what they’ve done with their careers. He talked about some non comics related publications that are popular like the Green Book and a Jewish parody of James Bond. He also spoke about Superfolks that influenced Kingdom Come. Nat mentioned that as of late he’s been reprinting works previously published by Eclipse, Aadvark, Dark Horse and Epic/Marvel. Scott McCloud and Nat spoke about 24 hour comics and some of the creators who did it and was published by Nat. Lea spoke about her own experience doing a 24 hour comic. Jim talked about the Licensable Bear, one issue having the first Obama in it and Nat selling a bunch on ebay and giving a cut of the ebay money to the artists.



Comics Arts Conference #3: Attorneys vs. Historians: Who Authors the Authorship Narrative? (50:19, 46mb)
An introduction was done by Kathleen McClancy. On the panel was James Thompson, Danny Barer, Alex Grand and Marc H. Greenberg. The group spoke about 3 cases where there are conflicting stories among the co-creators and publishing. They were Bob Kane and Bill Finger over Batman, Stan Lee, Martin Goodman, Jack Kirby and Joe Simon over Captain America and Stan Lee and Jack Kirby over Fantastic Four. They also pointed out how sales of the publisher or other media adaptions had correlated with those statements. They briefly went into how comic history books have written about these topics. Marc spoke about Batman and Me written by Bob Kane and Tom Andrae and Bob suing Tom and how that played into Bill Finger getting credit for Batman.



Spotlight on Robert Williams (48:38, 44.5mb)
Eric Reynolds interviews Robert Williams. Among the topics discussed were how much of his art is already finished in his head before he starts drawing or painting, his rules for himself as an artist, the comics he read as a kid and his other interests and how that influenced him as an artist. Robert talked about his early jobs he was fired from, working with Big Daddy Roth and then comics. Williams revealed he just didn’t fit in with the fine art world and how the punk rock culture become his peer group. They spoke about Juxtaposed, The Lowbrow art of Robert Williams, Zap Comics, Feltch and an obscenity case against underground comics. Other topics covered were politics, museums showing comic art, Tijuana Bibles and reduction & reproduction of art.



Splashing Ink of Museum Walls (52:04, 47.6mb)
Moderating the panel was Rob Salkowitz, panelists were: Kim Munson, Ann Nocenti, Adam Smith and Emil Ferris. Emil spoke about how art in museums was a part of her growing up. Kim spoke about the history of comic art in museums, Rob spoke about Robert Crumb being in a show with Rembrandt, Picasso and other traditional echelon of fine artists and why. Ann spoke about meeting Jack Able at Marvel and how art would be blown up and then sold for millions of dollars. Adam spoke about his plans for the new San Diego Comic Con Museum, how they want to be different from other museums dedicated to comic book art. Ann and Adam spoke about ‘ghettoizing’ comic book art and avoiding doing that within the museum. Emil discussed the Familiar Strange, the Wolfman being her favorite monster and what was behind the pentagram on the hand. Multiple people spoke about how taking 1 page out of a story and displaying it in a museum and how the comic art isn’t just art, it can be a historical artifact that people have a real attachment to.



Spotlight on Shannon Wheeler (54:28, 49.8mb)
Comic Con gave Shannon an inkpot award at the start of the panel. Shannon played 2 minutes of the Too Much Coffee Man Opera. Then Shannon did a reverse timeline of his career, where he started with the work he’s doing now, meeting Stormy Daniels at a strip club and Sh*t My President Says, and going back through time covering God is Disappointed with You, Oil and Water, Gramps Won’t Wake Up, Screw Heaven, When I die I’m going to Mars, The New Yorker and the process of relearning how to do cartoons to get published by them, the Too Much Coffee Man Opera and why he did it, the Too Much Coffee Man comic book and the incentive for stores. He spoke about the “bootleg” t-shirt of TMCM, JAB #3 where they shot a hole through the comic and Children with Glue.



Len Wein Tribute (48:19, 44.2mb)
Moderated by Gary Miereanu, panelists were Lynn Latham, Gillian Horvath, Christine Valada, Melinda Snodgrass, Paul Levitz and Charlotte Fullerton. The group talked about their first interaction with Len, working with him, where Len’s creative spirit came from, why he was so positive, his life long health issues, Len’s extraordinary memory, The Fan vs. Pro Trivia matches at San Diego, Len’s wish for Wolverine’s healing powers, Len’s odd rules for food and other things, Len’s work being displayed on Big Bang Theory, how Batman saved Len’s life as a kid, Len’s love of broadway musicals and singing, from the audience Michael Davis told a story about Len helping him out of a very serious situation with his singing. At the end a woman from the audience read something that Len wrote about Wolverine in an interview with her for Christine.



Graphic Novels: From Eisner to Explosion! (46:41, 42.7mb)
On the panel was Paul Levitz, Richard Burning, Scott McCloud and Emil Ferris. Scott talked about the Graphic Novel terminology and where he saw the graphic novel going after A Contract With God. Emil spoke about how Eisner’s work inspired her. Richard discussed the gap between the self expression of underground work and character expression of superhero work. Paul reminded everyone that A Contract With God was a disguised personal expression as it related to the death of his daughter. Paul also spoke to how Eisner saw the whole page when he drew, something that most artists didn’t do until the publishers replaced the 2x up boards with 1.5 boards. Emil talked about her crazy journey in creating and getting My Favorite Thing is Monsters published. Richard spoke about repackaging comics into graphic novels in the 1980s. They also spoke about the Graphic Novel format (particularly with A Contract With God) having the format fit the work, instead of having to fit the work into the format.



Comics Arts Conference #6: Two Women and Wonder Woman (51:56, 47.5mb)
Kathleen McClancy did the introduction and then Nicky Wheeler-Nicholson and Trina Robbins spoke about their issues with Jill Lepore’s book on Wonder Woman. Nicky went through the Greek Mythology influence on Wonder Woman that Jill didn’t mention, she also did this in regards to Amazon warriors. She also spoke of H. G. Peter and how under rated he is towards the success of Wonder Woman. She revealed how much of the family wasn’t that happy with Lepore’s book as Marston and his accomplishments were regularly trashed within it. Trina went through 3 golden age Wonder Woman stories that were both funny and revealing to Wonder Woman’s character. She also spoke about the changes to Wonder Woman over the years. Nicky spoke about the possibility of a good book about Wonder Woman and Marston ever coming out.



50th Anniversary of Underground Comics (50:51, 46.5mb)
Panelists were Joyce Farmer, Mary Fleener, Carol Tyler, Robert Williams, Denis Kitchen, Trina Robbins and Ron Turner. The panel was moderated by Charles Brownstein. Jackie Estrada started off by giving an Inkpot Award to Justin Green, who couldn’t make it to the convention. Carol Tyler accepted the award on his behalf. The group talked about how they got into Underground Comics, why they did those comics, what the current generation can learn from their struggles and S. Clay Wilson. In the audience was underground cartoonists Lee Mars and Bill Stout who also spoke.



2000AD: Simon Bisley (51:59, 47.5mb)
Simon Bisley is interviewed by Mike Molcher. They went over a range of topics including Simon being a self taught artist, his growing up, his influences, getting his professional start, painting, his styles of work and their evolution, getting work in the US, Batman / Judge Dredd, his following among the gay community, Lobo and where he was at the time, how he chooses projects, not doing a long run on a single character, Hellblazer, Album covers, what characters he wants to work on, his playing base in a band and his upcoming work.

IDW Artists Edition Panel (15:31, 14.2mb)
This was a very short panel where Scott Dunbier announced a new print run of Bernie Wrightson artist edition book and a new Bernie Wrightson Frankenstein artists edition book. Liz Wrightson joined the panel briefly as well. During the Q&A Scott revealed that DC for some reason doesn’t want to do any artists edition books and names some of the artists he’d do books on if he could. This panel was delibritely made short so that there could be a tribute panel for Steve Ditko who recently passed away.



Steve Ditko: Artist (45:17, 41.4mb)
Scott Dunbier, Paul Levitz, Nick Lowe, David Schwartz and Steve Leialoha all shared their stories of Steve Ditko. Paul spoke about working with Steve Ditko and Wally Wood at the age of 19 on Stalker. Scott talked about printing Ditko’s art in the artists edition books. David told his story of communicating with Ditko via letters and eventually getting a 3-hour visit and conversation with him. Nick told some hilarious Ditko stories courtesy of former Marvel editor Ralph Macchio. Steve Leialoha talked about inking Ditko pencils on what is likely his last comic book for another publisher and then meeting him. Paul and Nick revealed that DC and Marvel were still regularly reaching out to Ditko to see if he was willing to do some work for them, Marvel in particular wanted him to do something with Squirrel Girl. They spoke about Shade the Changing Man and what Ditko did best in comics.



The Gospel According to Archie (57:03, 52.2mb)
On the panel were Adam Sand, Rob Bradfied, Jennifer Joan, Tessica Tseang, Pat Jankiewicz and it was moderated by Erik Amaya. Among the topics discussed were Al Hartley’s work at Marvel and why he quit to work for Archie. They started talking about Spire, their licensed work, then the Archie comics. They went over some odd and now politically incorrect parts of the comic, how Archie characters were sometimes drawn off model, how certain characters like Reggie and Midge were almost never used and how there was some dark scenes not typically found in Archie Comics. The groups spoke about Hartley’s method of trying to convert people with these comics and why she didn’t agree with it. They also spoke about Jack Chick Comics and the Riverdale TV show.



Larry Stroman Spotlight (44:19, 40.5mb)
Larry got an Inkpot award to start off. He talked about his neighbourhood growing up and having dyslexia, how the Fireside Marvel books inspired him to become a comic artist, him quitting his job to pursue comics full time and moving to New York, selling his art in central park, going to a comics convention with his portfolio, Howard Chaykin giving him work and helping him get work from publishers, focusing on working for editor Carl Potts on the Epic line, getting his first regular book, his hilarious story about becoming the regular artist on X-Factor, doing Tribe at Image, his getting out of comics and doing other type of work, going back to do comics again, his commissions and how doing them has improved his inking, his restarting Tribe, his influences, differences between doing creator owned work via Image vs working for Marvel or DC, developing a style and having it slowly go away and how he feels about having one of his comics turned into a movie.



CBLDF – The Trials of Underground Comix (49:01, 44.8mb)
Moderated by Charles Brownstein the panelists were Robert Williams, Joyce Farmer and Ron Turner. Charles began by giving a brief overview of the censorship of EC Comics and the Comics Code Authority. Robert Williams spoke about psychedelic poster artists who were all EC Comics fans, he also spoke about the drug culture starting in the 1950s and the ‘beat’ culture. Ron continued on with history of how the beat culture connected to the origins of underground comics. Joyce spoke about her personal experience of getting married, having a child, getting a driver’s license, then divorcing her husband, Richard and Ron told a funny story about Feltch comics going missing causing a obscenity case to be dismissed, they also spoke about Zap Comics #4 being busted for obscenity and how that affected the comics industry.



Thi Bui Spotlight (48:13, 44.1mb)
Thi started by getting 3 audience members to join the panel for a reading a portion of her book The Best That We Could Do. She also spoke about A Different Pond, which was a children’s book that she drew, she revealed she is working with an Asian American Law organization to help fight the Trump administrator deport Asian refugees and the results of that work. She spoke about another book that is being worked on about climate change in Vietnam where the issue is very pressing. She talked about going to Vietnam twice and how the local population reacted to her. She also revealed why she chooses to use comics to tell her stories, how she deals with anxiety issues and the conflict within the Asian American communities in terms of conservative vs progressive politics.



How to create (and survive) a successful Graphic Novel series (45:25, 41.5mb)
The panelists were Jennifer and Matthew Holm, Raina Telgemeier and Traci Todd. The panel was moderated by Dr. Rose Brock. Jennifer and Matthew spoke about how they started collaborating together and their process of doing books. Raina spoke about her process and how much of her personal life she puts into the book. Traci spoke about the process from the editor’s perspective. They all revealed what they would tell their younger selves before doing a graphic novel. Traci recommended being brave and accepting feedback from humans (and not social media). They all gave recommendations for other graphic novels they enjoyed. They all spoke about what they wanted to be when they grew up, if they put real people in the book and how they keep themselves organized.



Fan vs. Pro Comic Trivia – Len Wein Tribute Edition (48:39, 44.5mb)
The Fan side was David Oakes, Derek McCaw and David Crowe. The Pro’s were Christopher Sequeira, Paul Levitz, Jamie Coville and eventually Glenn Hauman. Tom Galloway did some moderating and served on the fan side as did Derek McCaw. Christine Valada also did some moderating. All of the questions were about Len Wein’s work, including X-Men, Hulk, Swamp Thing, Batman, Teen Titans and much, much more. This is likely to be the last Fan vs. Pro Comic Trivia match.

DC teams up with Snapchat for Fan Competition to Win Badges to San Diego Comic-Con!

Are you a DC fan? Do you have a creative streak? Still need badges to San Diego Comic-Con?

Then the DC Super Heroes x Snap Lens Studio Competition is for you!

DC is partnering with Snap Inc’s Lens Studio to ask fans to create the ultimate DC-themed Snapchat Lens celebrating Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman. In return, the winner and one guest will receive a three-night trip to San Diego Comic-Con, July 19-22! The full prize includes roundtrip airfare, a hotel room, two Comic-Con International badges, wristbands for comic talent signings at the DC booth, $500 for expenses, and swag from DC and Snapchat

Enter by July 8 where you’ll find the entry instructions and free downloadable Lens Studio software. This competition is only open to United States residents who are 13 or older; competitors under 18 will need permission from a parent or legal guardian. The winner will be notified by email on or about July 12.

Be sure to click here for the full contest details, and good luck!

The 2018 Eisner Nominations Have Been Announced

The Eisners are the Oscars of comics held at San Diego Comic-Con each year. Today, this year’s nominations have been announced and the list is varied with a diverse group of creators, publishers, and voices. Check out below for this year’s group of nominees.

Congrats to everyone nominated and involved in the creation of these comics.

Best Short Story
  • “Ethel Byrne,” by Cecil Castelluci and Scott Chantler, in Mine: A Celebration of Liberty and Freedom for All Benefiting Planned Parenthood (ComicMix)
  • “Forgotten Princess,” by Phillip Kennedy Johnson and Antonio Sandoval, in Adventure Time Comics #13 (kaboom!)
  • ”A Life in Comics: The Graphic Adventures of Karen Green,” by Nick Sousanis, in Columbia Magazine (Summer 2017), http://magazine.columbia.edu/features/summer-2017/life-comics?page=0,0
  • “Small Mistakes Make Big Problems,” by Sophia Foster-Dimino, in Comics for Choice (Hazel Newlevant)
  • “Trans Plant,” by Megan Rose Gedris, in Enough Space for Everyone Else (Bedside Press)

Best Single Issue/One-Shot
  • Barbara, by Nicole Miles (ShortBox)
  • Hellboy: Krampusnacht, by Mike Mignola and Adam Hughes (Dark Horse)
  • Pope Hats #5, by Ethan Rilly (AdHouse Books)
  • The Spotted Stone, by Rick Veitch (Sun Comics)
  • What Is Left, by Rosemary Valero-O’Connell (ShortBox)

Best Continuing Series
  • Black Hammer, by Jeff Lemire, Dean Ormston, and David Rubín (Dark Horse)
  • Giant Days, by John Allison, Max Sarin, and Liz Fleming (BOOM! Box)
  • Hawkeye, by Kelly Thompson, Leonardo Romero, and Mike Walsh (Marvel)
  • Monstress, by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda (Image)
  • The Wicked + The Divine, by Kieron Gillen & Jamie McKelvie (Image)

Best Limited Series
  • Black Panther: World of Wakanda, by Roxane Gay, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Alitha E. Martinez (Marvel)
  • Extremity, by Daniel Warren Johnson (Image/Skybound)
  • The Flintstones, by Mark Russell, Steve Pugh, Rick Leonardi, and Scott Hanna (DC)
  • Mister Miracle, by Tom King and Mitch Gerads (DC)
  • X-Men: Grand Design, by Ed Piskor (Marvel)

Best New Series
  • Black Bolt, by Saladin Ahmed and Christian Ward (Marvel)
  • Grass Kings, by Matt Kindt and Tyler Jenkins (BOOM! Studios)
  • Maestros, by Steve Skroce (Image)
  • Redlands, by Jordie Belaire and Vanesa Del Rey (Image)
  • Royal City, by Jeff Lemire (Image)

Best Publication for Early Readers (up to age 8)
  • Adele in Sand Land, by Claude Ponti, translated by Skeeter Grant and Françoise Mouly (Toon Books)
  • Arthur and the Golden Rope, by Joe Todd-Stanton (Flying Eye/Nobrow)
  • Egg, by Kevin Henkes (Greenwillow Books)
  • Good Night, Planet, by Liniers (Toon Books)
  • Little Tails in the Savannah, by Frederic Brrémaud and Federico Bertolucci, translated by Mike Kennedy (Lion Forge/Magnetic)

Best Publication for Kids (ages 9–12)
  • Bolivar, by Sean Rubin (Archaia)
  • Home Time (Book One): Under the River, by Campbell Whyte (Top Shelf)
  • Nightlights, by Lorena Alvarez (Nobrow)
  • The Tea Dragon Society, by Katie O’Neill (Oni)
  • Wallace the Brave, by Will Henry (Andrews McMeel)

Best Publication for Teens (ages 13-17)
  • The Dam Keeper, by Robert Kondo and Dice Tsutsumi (First Second/Tonko House)
  • Jane, by Aline Brosh McKenna and Ramón K. Pérez (Archaia)
  • Louis Undercover, by Fanny Britt and Isabelle Arsenault, translated by Christelle Morelli and Susan Ouriou (Groundwood Books/House of Anansi)
  • Monstress, by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda (Image)
  • Spinning, by Tillie Walden (First Second)

Best Humor Publication
  • Baking with Kafka, by Tom Gauld (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Batman/Elmer Fudd Special #1, by Tom King, Lee Weeks, and Byron Vaughn (DC)
  • The Flintstones, by Mark Russell, Steve Pugh, Rick Leonardi, and Scott Hanna (DC)
  • Rock Candy Mountain, by Kyle Starks (Image)
  • Wallace the Brave, by Will Henry (Andrews McMeel)

Best Anthology
  • A Bunch of Jews (and Other Stuff): A Minyen Yidn, by Max B. Perlson, Trina Robbins et al. (Bedside Press)
  • A Castle in England, by Jamie Rhodes et al. (Nobrow)
  • Elements: Fire, A Comic Anthology by Creators of Color, edited by Taneka Stotts (Beyond Press)
  • Now #1, edited by Eric Reynolds (Fantagraphics)
  • The Spirit Anthology, edited by Sean Phillips (Lakes International Comic Art Festival)

Best Reality-Based Work
  • Audubon: On the Wings of the World, by Fabien Grolleau and Jerémie Royer, translated by Etienne Gilfillan (Nobrow)
  • The Best We Could Do, by Thi Bui (Abrams ComicArts)
  • Calamity Jane: The Calamitous Life of Martha Jane Cannary, 1852–1903, by Christian Perrissin and Matthieu Blanchin, translated by Diana Schutz and Brandon Kander (IDW)
  • Lennon: The New York Years, by David Foenkinos, Corbeyran, and Horne, translated by Ivanka Hahnenberger (IDW)
  • Spinning, by Tillie Walden (First Second)

Best Graphic Album—New
  • Crawl Space, by Jesse Jacobs (Koyama Press)
  • Eartha, by Cathy Malkasian (Fantagraphics)
  • My Favorite Thing Is Monsters, by Emil Ferris (Fantagraphics)
  • Stages of Rot, by Linnea Sterte (Peow)
  • The Story of Jezebel, by Elijah Brubaker (Uncivilized Books)

Best Graphic Album—Reprint
  • Boundless, by Jillian Tamaki (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Fantagraphics Studio Edition: Black Hole by Charles Burns, edited by Eric Reynolds (Fantagraphics)
  • Small Favors: The Definitive Girly Porno Collection, by Colleen Coover (Oni/Limerence)
  • Sticks Angelica, Folk Hero, by Michael DeForge (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Unreal City, by D. J. Bryant (Fantagraphics)

Best Adaptation from Another Medium
  • Beowulf, adapted by Santiago García and David Rubín (Image)
  • H. P. Lovecraft’s The Hound and Other Stories, adapted by Gou Tanabe, translated by Zack Davisson (Dark Horse)
  • Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, adapted by Christophe Chabouté, translated by Laure Dupont (Dark Horse)
  • Kindred, by Octavia Butler, adapted by Damian Duffy and John Jennings (Abrams ComicArts)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material
  • Audubon: On the Wings of the World, by Fabien Grolleau and Jerémie Royer, translated by Etienne Gilfillan (Nobrow)
  • Flight of the Raven, by Jean-Pierre Gibrat, translated by Diana Schutz and Brandon Kander (EuroComics/IDW)
  • FUN, by Paolo Bacilieri, translated by Jamie Richards (SelfMadeHero)
  • Ghost of Gaudi, by El Torres and Jesús Alonso Iglesias, translated by Esther Villardón Grande (Lion Forge/Magnetic)
  • The Ladies-in-Waiting, by Santiago García and Javier Olivares, translated by Erica Mena (Fantagraphics)
  • Run for It: Stories of Slaves Who Fought for the Freedom, by Marcelo D’Salete, translated by Andrea Rosenberg (Fantagraphics)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material—Asia
  • Furari, by Jiro Taniguchi, translated by Kumar Sivasubramanian (Fanfare/Ponent Mon)
  • Golden Kamuy, by Satoru Noda, translated by Eiji Yasuda (VIZ Media)
  • My Brother’s Husband, vol. 1, by Gengoroh Tagame, translated by Anne Ishii (Pantheon)
  • Otherworld Barbara, vol. 2, by Moto Hagio, translated by Matt Thorn (Fantagraphics)
  • Shiver: Junji Ito Selected Stories, by Junji Itotranslated by Jocelyne Allen (VIZ Media)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Strips
  • Celebrating Snoopy, by Charles M. Shulz, edited by Alexis E. Fajardo and Dorothy O’Brien (Andrews McMeel)
  • Crazy Quilt: Scraps and Panels on the Way to Gasoline Alley, by Frank King, edited by Peter Maresca (Sunday Press)
  • Foolish Questions and Other Odd Observations, by Rube Goldberg, edited by Peter Maresca and Paul C. Tumey (Sunday Press Books)
  • Sky Masters of the Space Force: The Complete Dailies, by Jack Kirby, Wally Wood et al., edited by Daniel Herman (Hermes Press)
  • Star Wars: The Classic Newspaper Strips, vol. 1, by Russ Manning et al., edited by Dean Mullaney (LOAC/IDW)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Comic Books
  • Akira 35th Anniversary Edition, by Katsuhiro Otomo, edited by Haruko Hashimoto, Ajani Oloye, and Lauren Scanlan (Kodansha)
  • Behaving MADly, edited by Craig Yoe (Yoe Books/IDW)
  • The Collected Neil the Horse, by Arn Saba/Katherine Collins, edited by Andy Brown (Conundrum)
  • Fantagraphics Studio Edition: Jaime Hernandez, edited by Gary Groth (Fantagraphics)
  • Will Eisner: The Centennial Celebration, 1917-2017, by Paul Gravett, Denis Kitchen, and John Lind (Kitchen Sink/Dark Horse)

Best Writer
  • Tom King, Batman, Batman Annual #2, Batman/Elmer Fudd Special #1, Mister Miracle (DC)
  • Matt Kindt, Grass Kings (BOOM! Studios); Ether (Dark Horse); Eternity, X-O Manowar (Valiant)
  • Jeff Lemire, Black Hammer (Dark Horse); Descender (Image)
  • Marjorie Liu, Monstress (Image)
  • Mark Russell, The Flintstones (DC)

Best Writer/Artist
  • Lorena Alvarez, Night Lights (Nobrow)
  • Chabouté, Moby Dick (Dark Horse); Alone, The Park Bench (Gallery 13/Simon & Schuster)
  • Emil Ferris, My Favorite Thing Is Monsters (Fantagraphics)
  • Cathy Malkasian, Eartha (Fantagraphics)
  • Jiro Taniguchi, Furari, Louis Vuitton Travel Guide: Venice (Fanfare/Ponent Mon)

Best Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team
  • Isabelle Arsenault, Louis Undercover (Groundwood Books/House of Anansi)
  • Mitch Gerads, Mister Miracle (DC)
  • Gary Gianni, Hellboy: Into the Silent Sea (Dark Horse)
  • Ramón K. Perez, Jane (Archaia)
  • David Rubín, Black Hammer #9 & #12, Ether, Sherlock Frankenstein #1–3 (Dark Horse); Beowulf (Image)

Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art)
  • Federico Bertolucci, Love: The Dinosaur, Little Tails (Lion Forge/Magnetic)
  • EFA, Monet: Itinerant of Light (NBM)
  • Jean-Pierre Gibrat, Flight of the Raven (EuroComics/IDW)
  • Cyril Pedrosa, Portugal (NBM)
  • Sana Takeda, Monstress (Image)

Best Cover Artist
  • Jorge Corona, No. 1 with a Bullet (Image)
  • Nick Derington, Mister Miracle (DC); Doom Patrol (DC Young Animal)
  • Brian Stelfreeze, Black Panther (Marvel)
  • Sana Takeda, Monstress (Image)
  • Julian Totino Tedesco, Hawkeye (Marvel)

Best Coloring
  • Emil Ferris, My Favorite Thing Is Monsters (Fantagraphics)
  • Mitch Gerads, Mister Miracle (DC)
  • Ed Piskor, X-Men: Grand Design (Marvel)
  • David Rubín, Ether, Black Hammer, Sherlock Frankenstein (Dark Horse); Beowulf (Image)
  • Dave Stewart, Black Hammer, BPRD: Devil You Know, Hellboy: Into the Silent Sea, Sherlock Frankenstein, Shaolin Cowboy (Dark Horse); Maestros (Image)
  • Rosemary Valero-O’Connell, What Is Left (ShortBox)

Best Lettering
  • Isabelle Arsenault, Louis Undercover (Groundwood Books/House of Anansi)
  • Clayton Cowles, Bitch Planet: Triple Feature, Redlands, The Wicked + The Divine (Image); Black Bolt, Spider-Gwen, Astonishing X-Men, Star Wars (Marvel)
  • Emil Ferris, My Favorite Thing Is Monsters (Fantagraphics)
  • Stan Sakai, Usagi Yojimbo, Groo: Slay of the Gods (Dark Horse)
  • John Workman, Mother Panic (DC Young Animal); Ragnorak (IDW)

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism
  • Alter Ego, edited by Roy Thomas (TwoMorrows)
  • The Comics Journal, edited by Dan Nadel, Timothy Hodler, and Tucker Stone, tcj.com (Fantagraphics)
  • Hogan’s Alley, edited by Tom Heintjes
  • Jack Kirby Collector, edited by John Morrow (TwoMorrows)
  • PanelXPanel magazine, edited by Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou, panelxpanel.com

Best Comics-Related Book
  • Deconstructing the Incal by Alejandro Jodorowsky and Moebius, by Jean Annestay and Christophe Quillien (Humanoids)
  • How Comics Work, by Dave Gibbons and Tim Pilcher (Wellfleet Press/Quarto Group)
  • How to Read Nancy: The Elements of Comics in Three Easy Panels, by Paul Karasik and Mark Newgarden (Fantagraphics)
  • Line of Beauty: The Art of Wendy Pini, by Richard Pini (Flesk)
  • Monograph, by Chris Ware (Rizzoli)
  • To Laugh That We May Not Weep: The Life and Times of Art Young, by Glenn Bray and Frank M. Young (Fantagraphics)

Best Academic/Scholarly Work
  • The Comics of Charles Schulz: The Good Grief of Modern Life, edited by Jared Gardner and Ian Gordon (University Press of Mississippi)
  • Ethics in the Gutter: Empathy and Historical Fiction in Comics, by Kate Polak (Ohio State University Press)
  • Latinx Superheroes in Mainstream Comics, by Frederick Luis Aldama (University of Arizona Press)
  • Neon Visions: The Comics of Howard Chaykin, by Brannon Costello (LSU Press)
  • Picturing Childhood: Youth in Transnational Comics, edited by Mark Heimermann and Brittany Tullis (University of Texas Press)

Best Publication Design
  • Akira 35th Anniversary Edition, designed by Phil Balsman, Akira Saito (Veia), NORMA Editorial, and MASH•ROOM (Kodansha)
  • Celebrating Snoopy, designed by Spencer Williams and Julie Phillips (Andrews McMeel)
  • Monograph, designed by Chris Ware (Rizzoli)
  • My Favorite Thing Is Monsters, designed by Jacob Covey (Fantagraphics)
  • Will Eisner: The Centennial Celebration, 1917-2017, designed by John Lind (Kitchen Sink/Dark Horse)

Best Digital Comic
  • Bandette, by Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover (Monkeybrain/comiXology)
  • Barrier, by Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin (Panel Syndicate)
  • The Carpet Merchant of Konstaniniyya, by Reimena Yee (reimenayee.com/the-carpet-merchant)
  • Contact High, by James F. Wright and Josh Eckert (gumroad.com/l/YnxSm)
  • Harvey Kurtzman’s Marley’s Ghost, by Harvey Kurtzman, Josh O’Neill, Shannon Wheeler, and Gideo Kendall (comiXology Originals/Kitchen, Lind & Associates)
  • Quince, by Sebastian Kadlecik, Kit Steinkellner, and Emma Steinkellner, translated by Valeria Tranier (Fanbase Press/comiXology)

Best Webcomic

Traveling Stories & IDW Present the Ultimate San Diego Comic-Con Sweepstakes

Traveling Stories and IDW Publishing have launched the annual San Diego Comic-Con sweepstakes, a contest which will last through June 13th at 3:00pm PT.

Those who enter have a chance of winning the following ultimate experience package:

  • Two 4-day passes to sold-out Comic-Con
  • Airfare for 2 within the continental U.S.
  • Four nights stay at the Wyndham Bayside in San Diego Gaslamp district
  • An exclusive tour of the San Diego Comic Art Gallery with Ted Adams, CEO of IDW
  • Airport pickup and shuttle to the gallery, and then to the hotel

Anyone in the world can enter! $10 gives you 10 chances to win. Each additional $1 is another chance – the math is simple. Every dollar is a donation to Traveling Stories, a 501c3 nonprofit organization that empowers kid to outsmart poverty by helping them fall in love with reading by the 4th grade.

How to snag entries in the sweepstakes is easy, fast, and secure. Just follow the steps from there!

Win the Ultimate Fan Trip with Diamond’s San Diego Comic-Con Total Prize Pack!

Every summer, the city of San Diego becomes a destination for comics and pop culture fans as they flock to Comic-Con. The event attracts attendees from all over the world and tickets have become quite difficult to acquire. Then there’s the pricey cost of accommodations and airfare on top of the tickets… Well, Diamond Comic Distributors is looking to solve all those problems for two lucky pop culture fans!

Diamond is providing the opportunity of a lifetime with The San Diego Comic-Con Total Prize Pack! Diamond will give one grand prize winner and a friend roundtrip airfare, a five-night hotel stay, and four-day passes to Comic-Con in San Diego, the biggest comics and pop culture convention in the world!

Diamond will give the winner and their guest four-day passes, which includes admission to Preview Night on Wednesday so you can get a jump on shopping for comics, collectibles, and other goodies! You’ll stay at the four-star, waterfront Manchester Grand Hyatt in downtown San Diego, which is located right next to the San Diego Convention Center. And the winner will receive a Comic-Con exclusive item courtesy of Diamond Select Toys!

So how do you enter this amazing contest? We’re glad you asked! Head over to Diamond’s Gleam Campaign, and fill out the required entry information. From there, you can increase the number of times your name is entered in the drawing by engaging with Diamond’s social media and e-newsletters. In other words, following Diamond’s many pop-culture Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube platforms, as well as subscribing to e-newsletters will enter your name into the drawing pool between five to ten more times per interaction.

Get your name in there as many times as you can and you could be going on the pop-culture trip of a lifetime! Learn more about the contest and enter by APRIL 30 to win here!

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day tomorrow. What are folks excited for? What do you plan on getting? Sound off in the comments below. While you decide on that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

Fox 13 – San Diego Comic-Con vs. Salt Lake Comic Con is finally going to trial – How are more conventions not stepping up?

CBR – Franco Teases ‘Hard R’ Multiple Man X-Men Film, like Logan, Deadpool – Um, k.

The Outhouse – Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina #9 Delayed Until Maybe 2018 – Will we see this or Afterlife with Archie?

 

Reviews

Atomic Junk Shop – The Cross-Eyed Mutt

Talking Comics – Dark Fang #1