Tag Archives: rick remender

Z2 and Anthrax are Among the Living

Among the Living

Just ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, Z2 gives music fans something to celebrate with news of one of the publisher’s most ambitious projects yet! The Among the Living graphic novel pulls together a who’s who of names from around comics and music for a track by track storyline inspired by one of heavy metal’s most iconic albums! Today’s announcement brings news that Anthrax has teamed with the publisher of music tie-in graphic novels to assemble an all-star cast of famous fans to bring the band’s breakthrough album to the printed page for the first time!

An anthology narrated by the longtime mascot “The Not Man” newly designed by Greg Nicotero; Among the Living unites Charlie Benante and Scott Ian with writers Brian Azzarello, Grant Morrison, Jimmy Palmiotti, Brian Posehn, Rick Remender, Corey Taylor, Joseph Trohman, Gerard and Mikey Way, and Rob Zombie, with more to be announced. Artists include Roland BoschiMaan House, Dave Johnson, Scott Koblish, Darrick Robertson, and Erik Rodriguez, and more, with covers by Charlie Benante, JG Jones, and Eric Powell. Bandmembers Benante and Ian will collaborate on an original story inspired by the fan favorite anthem “I Am the Law,” featuring the legendary comic book antihero Judge Dredd, in partnership with 2000 AD. This will make official the decades-long connection between the character and the band, rewarding comic book fans and metalheads alike!

This extensive project will be offered in multiple formats, with deluxe and super deluxe editions inclusive of special picture disc vinyl, an exclusive MadBalls™ toy, art prints, and even a gold record plaque! All editions are available to order directly from Z2’s website now, with Charlie Benante’s Judge Dredd variant exclusive to preorders of the standard edition!

Rick Remender and Jerome Opeña’s Seven to Eternity Returns November 18

The fourth and final story arc of the bestselling fantasy series Seven to Eternity by writer Rick Remender and artist Jerome Opeña will begin with issue #14 this November.

The series is projected to come to its breathtaking conclusion in 2021 with an extra-length Seven to Eternity #17.

Adam and The Mud King must make a final sacrifice before it does. The origin of the Springs revealed. One giant evil consumes everything, and you celebrate it excitedly.

Seven to Eternity #14 Cover A by Opeña & Hollingsworth (Diamond Code SEP200054) and Seven to Eternity #14 Cover B by Julian Totino Tedesco (Diamond Code SEP200055) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, November 18.

Seven to Eternity #15 Cover A by Opeña & Hollingsworth (Diamond Code OCT200223) and Seven to Eternity #15 Cover B by Tula Lotay (Diamond Code OCT200224) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, December 16.

Review: The Scumbag #1

The Scumbag #1

Everyone wants to be a hero. Or at the very least, everyone loves to root for the hero. They’re good looking and they’re tough. They’re smooth and they’re smart. They may have a troubled past, but they always have a chance for redemption. Plus, they always get the girl. Ernie Ray Clementine, the hero of The Scumbag #1, is none of these things. Yet, he’s the only thing that can save the world from Armageddon in this new ongoing series from Image Comics.

This series, penned by Rick Remender, takes a crass, illiterate, drug addict, injects him with an experimental super serum, and throws him into the world of high stakes espionage. The first issue introduces us to Ernie and sets the stakes for the first arc. Unfortunately, it doesn’t go much further than set up. Which wouldn’t be a bad thing, except that everything in this first issue, and some of the best lines within the issue for that matter, were laid out in the synopsis to the comic book.

A character profile and introductory letter to the reader, written by Remender and included at the end of the issue, actually give us more of Ernie’s background than the comic does. Full disclosure, if you buy the first issue, maybe flip to the back and read the letter, as it gave me more of an appreciation for the type of character Ernie is supposed to be than the actual comic did.

The story does have a science-fiction element that I found surprising. Though, outrageous and fantastical as this comic’s premise is, the sci-fi element just seems like one story element too many. For a comic where the plot doesn’t move forward beyond the synopsis, there’s almost too much going on in this first issue. That all being said, one thing I did love about this issue was that the background characters break the fourth wall. As the narrator’s voice is introducing us to Ernie, these characters affirm or add to the details being shared.

Each issue of this series will be drawn by a different artist. In The Scumbag #1, Lewis LaRosa gets first dibs. LaRosa’s art style is like a cross between an impressionist painting and street graffiti. His line work is sparse, yet the images in each panel are always clear. The artwork really sells the locations of each scene and makes the one fight sequence in this first issue look amazing. The colors used by Moreno Dinisio are bright, but were obviously applied digitally. I’m not sure either of these details act as the best compliment to LaRosa’s illustrations. In addition to a rotation of main artists, each issue of this series will have will have multiple variant covers drawn by a string of A-List artists.

The Scumbag #1 is not for everyone. The first issue alone has blood, gore, diarrhea, masturbation, and heavy drug use. Fans of action movies and anti-heroes will surely find something to like about this series. Those who enjoy character development and complex plots should probably choose a different title. Honestly, considering the string of artists slated to draw covers for each issue, this might be the type of series a person buys just for the cover art. In any case, give this one a browse before you commit to purchasing it.

Story: Rick Remender Art: Lewis LaRosa
Colors: Moreno Dinisio Letters: Rus Wooton
Story: 3.0 Art: 8.5 Overall: 5.8 Recommendation: Read

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Early Review: The Scumbag #1

The Scumbag #1

Everyone wants to be a hero. Or at the very least, everyone loves to root for the hero. They’re good looking and they’re tough. They’re smooth and they’re smart. They may have a troubled past, but they always have a chance for redemption. Plus, they always get the girl. Ernie Ray Clementine, the hero of The Scumbag #1, is none of these things. Yet, he’s the only thing that can save the world from Armageddon in this new ongoing series from Image Comics.

This series, penned by Rick Remender, takes a crass, illiterate, drug addict, injects him with an experimental super serum, and throws him into the world of high stakes espionage. The first issue introduces us to Ernie and sets the stakes for the first arc. Unfortunately, it doesn’t go much further than set up. Which wouldn’t be a bad thing, except that everything in this first issue, and some of the best lines within the issue for that matter, were laid out in the synopsis to the comic book.

A character profile and introductory letter to the reader, written by Remender and included at the end of the issue, actually give us more of Ernie’s background than the comic does. Full disclosure, if you buy the first issue, maybe flip to the back and read the letter, as it gave me more of an appreciation for the type of character Ernie is supposed to be than the actual comic did.

The story does have a science-fiction element that I found surprising. Though, outrageous and fantastical as this comic’s premise is, the sci-fi element just seems like one story element too many. For a comic where the plot doesn’t move forward beyond the synopsis, there’s almost too much going on in this first issue. That all being said, one thing I did love about this issue was that the background characters break the fourth wall. As the narrator’s voice is introducing us to Ernie, these characters affirm or add to the details being shared.

Each issue of this series will be drawn by a different artist. In The Scumbag #1, Lewis LaRosa gets first dibs. LaRosa’s art style is like a cross between an impressionist painting and street graffiti. His line work is sparse, yet the images in each panel are always clear. The artwork really sells the locations of each scene and makes the one fight sequence in this first issue look amazing. The colors used by Moreno Dinisio are bright, but were obviously applied digitally. I’m not sure either of these details act as the best compliment to LaRosa’s illustrations. In addition to a rotation of main artists, each issue of this series will have will have multiple variant covers drawn by a string of A-List artists.

The Scumbag #1 is not for everyone. The first issue alone has blood, gore, diarrhea, masturbation, and heavy drug use. Fans of action movies and anti-heroes will surely find something to like about this series. Those who enjoy character development and complex plots should probably choose a different title. Honestly, considering the string of artists slated to draw covers for each issue, this might be the type of series a person buys just for the cover art. In any case, give this one a browse before you commit to purchasing it.

Story: Rick Remender Art: Lewis LaRosa
Colors: Moreno Dinisio Letters: Rus Wooton
Story: 3.0 Art: 8.5 Overall: 5.8 Recommendation: Read

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Rick Remender’s Scumbag Gets Four Incentive Covers

The forthcoming humor series The Scumbag by Rick Remender will feature four scumily rare incentive covers—a pretty scummy 1:10 by Tula Lotay, a scumtastic 1:25 by Yanick Paquette & Nathan Fairbairn, a 1:50 silver scum-foil by Jerome Opeña and colored by Moreno Dinisio, and an extra, super scumtacular 1:100 gold foil edition of the same Opeña cover, but GOLD like our hero Ernie Ray’s front tooth! All this stunning scumbaggery available this October from Image Comics.

In addition to these highly collectible and totally scummy variants, The Scumbag will feature a murderers’ row of Rick’s favorite all-star artistic talent rotating interior art duties on each issue, with Punisher superstar artist Lewis LaRosa on deck for issue #1.

The Scumbag is the story of Ernie Ray Clementine, a profane, illiterate, drug addicted, biker, with a fifth-grade education and the only thing standing between us and total Armageddon because this dummy accidentally received a power-imbuing serum making him the world’s most powerful super spy.

Ernie is a relic of a bygone era, the living embodiment of sex, drugs and rock and roll—so, this doesn’t make things easy for the spy organization that needs his help as they bribe, cajole, and manipulate Ernie to choose between his own self-interests and doing what’s right.

The Scumbag will join Remender’s growing Giant Generator Studios empire, alongside such salesbeasts as Death Or Glory with Bengal, Seven to Eternity with Jerome Opeña, Low with Greg Tocchini, Fear Agent with Jerome Opeña and Tony Moore, Tokyo Ghost with Sean Gordon Murphy, Black Science with Matteo Scalera, Strange Girl with Eric Nguyen, Deadly Class with Wes Craig, and more.

The Scumbag #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, October 21st.

  • The Scumbag #1 Cover A LaRosa & Dinisio – Diamond Code AUG200010
  • The Scumbag #1 Cover B Robinson – Diamond Code AUG200011
  • The Scumbag #1 Cover C Blank Sketch – Diamond Code AUG208188
  • The Scumbag #1 Cover D Lotay 1:10 incentive – Diamond Code AUG208008
  • The Scumbag #1 Cover E Paquette 1:25 incentive – Diamond Code AUG208009
  • The Scumbag #1 Cover F Opeña & Dinisio 1:50 Silver Foil incentive – Diamond Code AUG208010
  • The Scumbag #1 Cover G Opeña & Dinisio 1:100 Gold Foil incentive – Diamond Code AUG208191

Underrated: Tokyo Ghost: The Atomic Garden

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet-pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week:  Tokyo Ghost: The Atomic Garden.


I had never heard of Tokyo Ghost: The Atomic Garden. until I saw the cover of the trade at my LCS, which doesn’t really mean much other than sometimes I miss things. Something about the cover caught my attention as I was putting it on the shelf. There was something about a motorcycle rider stuck full of arrows that made me stop and wonder what the hell I was putting on the shelf, so I flipped the book and read a synopsis that was just curious enough to be immediately interesting, saw Rick Remender’s name and immediately purchased the book.

It never made it to the shelf.

The synopsis that helped to hook me in: The Isles of Los Angeles 2089: Humanity is addicted to technology, a population of unemployed leisure seekers blissfully distracted from toxic contamination, who borrow, steal, and kill to buy their next digital fix. Getting a virtual buzz is the only thing left to live for. It’s the biggest industry, the only industry, the drug everyone needs, and gangsters run it all. And who do these gangsters turn to when they need their rule enforced? Constables Led Dent and Debbie Decay. This duo is about to be given a job that will force them out of the familiar squalor of Los Angeles to take down the last tech-less country on Earth: The Garden Nation of Tokyo. You can check out the first issue on Image’s website from this link if you’re curious.

The promise of a story that deals with the dangers of technology wasn’t lost on the person who works with technology every damn day across two jobs and sees the impact of it on another as digital comics are an always present conversation piece at the shop (usually in how they don’t compare, but then that’s to be expected given the people in the conversation are literally buying physical comics at the time).

Remender takes our current obsession with technology to an extreme with Tokyo Ghost, imagining a world that reminds me of the dystopian future of the Matrix with the worst of a Hollywood drug den spread across LA. If Snake Plisken was here, he’d be trying to escape. Through the haze and horror of a tech addicted world, Remender focuses on a Constable, Led Dent, and his tech-free partner Debbie Decay. We see Debbie try to break Led’s all encompassing tech addiction by forcing him to detox… it’s an oddly uncomfortable story that’s all the more powerful by the striking nature of the addiction.

Look, I know you’re reading this on your phone, tablet, laptop or whatever. But this is a book that’ll remind you to go outside in an oddly non-preachy way. It doesn’t hurt that the art is perfectly suited to do what it needs to do; whether in the hell of LA or the relative paradise of Japan… this is a book that you really should be reading.

That the story is good is a byproduct of it’s message – and that’s one we probably all need to listen to (he says as he goes back to surfing the interwebs, where, incidentally, I discovered this is volume one of two, so maybe technology isn’t all bad…).


Join us next week when we look at something else that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

People’s History of the Marvel Universe, Week 18: The Social Worker and the COP

When we last left our heroes, Captain America and the Falcon had returned to New York City after liberating a Caribbean island from Nazis and once again foiling the Red Skull’s Cosmic Cube machinations. Upon their return in #120, the question became what the status quo would be for the new partnership in their new environment.

(Pictured: two bros just broing around, casually shirtless.
It’s not like they do this all the time or anything.)

The new status quo would take a few issues to show up, but starting with #139, for almost two years – two years which saw Captain America and the Falcon handed off from Stan Lee[1] to Steve Englehart (by way of Gary Friedrich and Gerry Conway)[2] – Cap writers went back to one of the oldest scenarios in comics.

By night, Captain America and the Falcon would patrol New York City as vigilante superheroes. By day, they would adopt civilian identities that spoke to their ideas of civic engagement: Sam Wilson returned to his job as a social worker, Steve Rogers took up a new job as a cop. Both worked the Harlem beat.[3]

These are their stories.

Rick Remender Introduces The Scumbag this October

New York Times bestselling writer, showrunner, and terrific disco dancer Rick Remender launches an all-new comedy espionage series The Scumbag from Image Comics, set to hit shelves this October. This new ongoing series will feature a murderers’ row of all-star artistic talent rotating each issue. The first issue showcases the stunning work of Lewis LaRosa with subsequent chapters and covers by brilliant talents such as Andrew Robinson, Eric Powell, Tula Lotay, Wes Craig, Roland Boschi, Simone Di Meo, Duncan Fegredo, Yanick Paquette, Mike McKone, Dave Johnson, and Moreno Dinisio.

The Scumbag is the story of Ernie Ray Clementine, a profane, illiterate, drug addicted, biker, with a fifth-grade education and the only thing standing between us and total Armageddon because this dummy accidentally received a power-imbuing serum making him the world’s most powerful super spy.

Ernie is a relic of a bygone era, the living embodiment of sex, drugs, and rock and roll—so, this doesn’t make things easy for the spy organization that needs his help as they bribe, cajole, and manipulate Ernie to choose between his own self-interests and doing what’s right.

The Scumbag #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, October 21st.

The Scumbag #1

Get a New Look at The Last Days of American Crime

The Last Days of American Crime is a brand new comic adaptation coming to Netflix On June 5 and we have a new look. The film is based on the comic series published by Radical Publishing and created by Rick Remender and Greg Tocchini.

As a final response to terrorism and crime, the U.S. government plans to broadcast a signal making it impossible for anyone to knowingly commit unlawful acts. Graham Bricke (Édgar Ramírez), a career criminal who was never able to hit the big score, teams up with famous gangster progeny Kevin Cash (Michael Pitt), and black market hacker Shelby Dupree (Anna Brewster), to commit the heist of the century and the last crime in American history before the signal goes off.

Netflix Reveals Rick Remender and Greg Tocchini’s The Last Days of American Crime

There’s been rumors of the comic series The Last Days of American Crime coming to film for some time and it looks like it’s finally happening at Netflix. The Last Days of American Crime was a comic series published by Radical Publishing and created by Rick Remender and Greg Tocchini.

As a final response to terrorism and crime, the U.S. government plans to broadcast a signal making it impossible for anyone to knowingly commit unlawful acts. Graham Bricke (Édgar Ramírez), a career criminal who was never able to hit the big score, teams up with famous gangster progeny Kevin Cash (Michael Pitt), and black market hacker Shelby Dupree (Anna Brewster), to commit the heist of the century and the last crime in American history before the signal goes off.

The comic series was amazing and it’s exciting we finally get to see a live-action version. The Last Days of American Crime comes to Netflix on June 5.

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