Tag Archives: primordial

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Around the Tubes

Newburn #2

It was new comic book day yesterday! What’d you all get? What’d you like? What’d you dislike? Sound off in the comments below. While you think about that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

The Beat – Comings and Goings: Promotions at DC, Marvel, Heavy Metal, First Second – Congrats everyone!

The Mary Sue – Lynda Carter Voices Support for the Trans Community – The greatest.

Reviews

AIPT – Edgar Allan Poe’s Snifter of Death #3
Collected Editions – Metal Men: Full Metal Jacket
Monkeys Fighting Robots – Newburn #2
Monkeys Fighting Robots – Primordial #4
AIPT – Reign of X Vol. 7

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day! What are you all getting? What are you excited for? Sound off in the comments below! While you wait for shops to open, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

Screen Rant – Comic Fans Petition for Presidential Medal of Freedom for George Pérez – Hells yes. We can get behind this.

Reviews

CBR – Captain America/Iron Man #1
Geek Dad – I Am Batman #4
Monkeys Fighting Robots – Primordial #4

I Am Batman #4

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Radio Apocalypse #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

A Chance (Graphic Mundi) – A story about a family’s struggles and triumphs about raising kids, adoption, and struggles with health.

Almost American #3 (AfterShock) – This based on a true story comic series about Russian FSB agents who defect has been intriguing so far and as the tension and danger ramps up, we want to see how crazy this story really is!

Batman #117 (DC Comics) – “Fear State” has been one of the best Batman events in years and we’re excited to see how it ends and where it leaves the status-quo.

Batman Secret Files: The Gardener #1 (DC Comics) – The Gardener has been an x-factor of a character. We don’t know much about her but that’s going to change here!

Carriers #1 (Red 5 Comics) – A band of weaponized carrier pigeons, they soar the night sky looking for new threats and find their largest one yet when the Croc King comes climbing up out of the New York sewer!

Chicken Devil #2 (AfterShock) – A fast food chain owner seeks revenge against the mob who killed his family. There’s something very 80s about this series and we’re excited for that.

Commander Rao #1 (Scout Comics) – On the final dawn of an exhausted war, a rogue commander sets out on a warpath to confront a tyrannical baron. A year later, stories are sung of her heroism, but the mystery of her motives remains.

Dark Ages #3 (Marvel) – This alternate world story has been great so far and the twists have been excellent. Apocalypse looks like he’s unstoppable with the “heroes” he’s gathered, will the rest be able to stand up against him?

Getting Dizzy #1 (BOOM! Studios) – Dizzy wants to be the best but everything she’s tried has been a disaster. Now she needs to stand up to defend her neighborhood when the Negatrixes attack!

The Nice House on the Lake #6 (DC Comics) – Ending the first arc, it’s a doozy of an issue. Holy crap!

Primordial #3 (Image Comics) – We’re having a lot of fun with this weird alternate history involving the space race.

Radio Apocalypse #1 (Vault Comics) – Long after the rock out of space struck the world and turned it all to dust, in Bakerstown stands the last Radio Station on the planet. Radio Apocalypse broadcasting into the unknown. It’s the soundtrack to the end of the world!

Robins #1 (DC Comics) – What’s better than one Robin? All the Robins!

Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 (DC Comics) – There’s been some high-profile news lately about Jonathan Kent and his sexuality. This is the issue eyes are on. It’s already getting a new printing, so don’t miss the “event” that has made the mainstream news!

Wonder Woman: Evolution #1 (DC Comics) – We’re always excited to check out a new Wonder Woman series and where it’ll take the character. In this series she’ll stand trial as aliens judge humanity’s worthiness to exist in the universe!

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Amazing Spider-Man #77

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Amazing Spider-Man #77 (Marvel) – “Beyond” has been a solid new direction for the Spider-Man titles and Kelly Thompson steps in as writer and Sara Pichelli as artist of this issue. We’re excited to see what they do with the new focus.

Ant #1 (Image Comics) – After a week delay, we get to see Erik Larsen’s take on the classic character. Can’t wait to see what Larsen does with a brand-new ongoing series.

Comrade Kill (Adhouse Books) – “A Cold War super soldier accidentally wakes from a cryogenic freeze long after the war has ended to find out his existence is now meaningless. Being too dumb to reconcile this he goes out into the wild to satisfy a pointless mission objective that no one asked him to do.” That sounds too awesome to not check out.

Cross to Bear #1 (AfterShock) – Jack the Ripper ran to the Wild West and is being pursued by The Order, descendants of Crusaders sworn to eradicate the unnatural.

DC vs. Vampires #1 (DC Comics) – It’s the Justice League vs. Vampires!

The Harbinger #1 (Valiant) – Harbinger is back and we’re so excited for this new volume and direction. This is a series that is likely to be the center of the Valiant world going forward and we want to see where it all goes.

Hellboy: The Silver Lantern Club #1 (Dark Horse) – We’re always excited for a new Hellboy series which tend to do a solid job of balancing the big meta picture and being accessible for new readers.

House of Slaughter #1 (BOOM! Studios) – Something is Killing the Children is a hit and we want to see how this new spin-off series is handled.

Inferno #2 (Marvel) – The first issue was a lot of setup as the end game of Jonathan Hickman’s vision for the X-Men begins. Here’s hoping things really get rolling here.

Primordial #2 (Image Comics) – A brand-new series from Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino that puts a twist on the space race with an alternative take on history.

Search for Hu #2 (AfterShock) – The first issue was great with dips into generally not known history when it comes to Jewish migration mixed with action and family drama.

Swamp Dogs #1 (Scout Comics/Black Caravan) – Confederate soldiers are brought back to life by Voodoo and crave flesh!

Task Force Z #1 (DC Comics) – Task Force X saw villains working their way to freedom. Task Force Z will see dead villains working for a new chance at life! Well ok then.

Tiny Dancer (Atheneum Books for Young Readers) – Sien Cherson Siegel’s second graphic novel about her life in ballet.

The Winchester Mystery House #1 (Source Point Press) – The house is pretty famous and we’re intrigued into how you turn it into a comic series.

Around the Tubes

Primordial #1

It’s a new week and we have a lot coming at you. While you wait for things to get rolling, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

NASA – NASA Releases Interactive Graphic Novel “First Woman” – Awesome!

Reviews

Collected Editions – Batman: The World
Batman News – Batman Secret Files: Miracle Molly #1
Boxing Inside – Championess
AIPT – Death of Doctor Strange #1
AIPT – Frontiersman #1
Blog Critics – Night Bus
Talking Comics – Primordial #1
CBR – X-Men: Legends #1

Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s Primordial Rockets to a Second Printing

Superstars Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s new series—Primordial—launched with a shower of enthusiasm across the industry and sold out completely at the distributor level. The issue is being rushed back to print in order to keep up with customer demand. 

Primordial reveals to readers that In 1957, the USSR launched the dog, Laika, into Earth’s orbit. Two years later, the USA responded with two monkeys, Able and Baker. These animals never returned. But, unbeknownst to everyone, they did not die in orbit…they were taken. And now they are coming home.

This six issue miniseries is the most recent collaboration from the creative team who brought readers the Eisner Award winning, critically lauded Gideon Falls.

Primordial #1, second printing (Diamond Code AUG218388) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, October 20. 

Primordial #1, second printing

Review: Primordial #1

Primordial #1
Primordial #1, cover by Andrea Sorrentino

The Space Race between the Soviets and the Americans during the 1960s has always been fertile ground for conspiracy-centric storytelling, ripe with classic sci-fi concepts and ideas informed by a long tradition of weird fiction. Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s new book, Primordial, is firmly set within that tradition, but what it’s managed to produce on the visual front is what truly stands out as special.

Primordial follows a black electrical engineer from MIT called Dr. Pembrook, a man who’s interest in an American space mission where monkeys were shot into space to test travel by shuttle leads him to a secret report about the operation’s hasty cancellation that questions whether the alleged failure of the project was fact or an elaborate fiction to cover something up.

Pembrook’s discovery pushed him down the rabbit hole into conspiracy territory, led by a question that instantly makes the story take a whole new spin: what if the animal shuttle flights revealed something that scared everyone into not pursing further travel?

Lemire’s script perfectly captures the nail-biting paranoia that tends to be a staple in these types of stories, but when things get cosmic, it’s Sorrentino who steps up and steals the spotlight. It works because Lemire allows the plot to unravel in two spaces, if you will, in which Pembrook’s side is allowed to develop on its own while the animals’ flight is also given room to present its trajectory.

Primordial #1
Primordial #1

The more traditional, almost spy-thriller aspects of the story belong to Pembrook while the all-out sci-fi part of the equation is afforded to the animals. Sorrentino capitalizes on the setup to let loose in what can only be described as pure and unfiltered creativity, especially when it comes to the space travel sequences.

Panel work in these sections of the book break with structure and form to reach a higher level of visual play that ranges from panel collisions to colors flying off into unexpected parts of the page. It all combines to create a sense of wonder and even fear that frames the animals’ experience as a complete transformation of the rules of physics that will transport them to uniquely unknown places.

It tips its hat to Jack Kirby sci-fi, but it also borrows from classic rock and prog album cover art to breath life into many of the surprises the book viscerally throws at its readers as the story’s pacing picks up. In other words, Primordial is a visual marvel, a feast for the eyes that’s hard not to get lost in.

Dave Stewart’s coloring is largely responsible for the visuals’ triumphs as well. The book is bright and it captures the kind of naïve optimism that tends to characterize attempts at space travel. It makes for an experience in which the unknown is given a chance to reveal itself and to pose questions that go beyond what’s seen. Stewart’s work elevates that idea and gives it new dimensions.

Primordial #1 possesses a very exciting and intense sense of discovery and exploration that rests on the notion that secrets and conspiracies can generate quite a set of sense-shattering images. It’s a supreme example of what can be achieved with visual storytelling and how comics can offer narrative possibilities other mediums can only hope to imagine.

Story: Jeff Lemire Art: Andrea Sorrentino Colors: Dave Stewart
Story: 9.0 Art: 10 Recommendation: Read and make sure to give comics to space animals for their voyages

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Primordial #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Batman ’89 #2 (DC Comics) – It’s been fun going back to the “film universe” of Batman and we want to see where it goes, especially with what has been hinted at.

Batman: The World (DC Comics) – Batman stories from creative teams from around the world in a new anthology.

Black Widow #11 (Marvel) – This series has delivered with every issue. It mixes great action, with real emotion, and the sexiness this sort of “spy” story can deliver. It’s just perfect entertainment.

Campisi #2 (AfterShock) – The mob vs. dragon. That’s all you really need to know about this one.

Eternals: Thanos Rises #1 (Marvel) – The Eternals have been shaken up in their own series delivering a story that makes them “A” level in the Marvel Universe. What this spin-off brings to the table has us intrigued.

Hellboy & the BPRD 1957 Family Ties (Dark Horse) – Hellboy is always fun. This one-shot focuses on an unwanted house guest that Hellboy and BPRD agent Susan Xiang need to take care of.

I Am Batman #1 (DC Comics) – John Ridley has been delivering an interesting take on the next Batman with a story that features a lot of emotion and depth.

Kang the Conqueror #2 (Marvel) – The first issue did a solid job of streamlining the character’s convoluted history. We’re excited to see where this second issue goes as a young Kang begins to confront his different versions in a twisted version of “this is your life”.

MAW #1 (BOOM! Studios) – What happens when one woman becomes the real monster society has always made her out to be? That alone has us intrigued to read this one.

Nobody’s Child #1 (Behemoth Comics) – Albino rhinos have a genetic code that holds the properties to regenerate man. This leads to their near extinction. This is the story of a boy who decides to dedicate his life to protecting this rhino.

Primordial #1 (Image Comics) – Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino launch this new series about some of the animal test subjects during the early years of the space program. The animals never came back… they were taken and all of these years later, they’re coming home.

Stray Dogs (Image Comics) – If you missed this series as individual issues, you need to get the trade. It’s a murder mystery from the perspective of the dogs that might have witnessed it. Amazing art and full of tension.

Unearthed: A Jessica Cruz Story (DC Comics) – A new take on Jessica Cruz’s origin story. We’re fans of the character and interested in seeing what new ideas can be done with her.

Warhammer 40,000: Sisters of Battle #2 (Marvel) – The first issue was a good introduction to this faction and the world delivering solid art and action. Individuals who enjoy a straightforward “space marine kills alien” type story should check this out.

X-Men: Trial of Magneto #2 (Marvel) – The debut was full of emotion as the attempt to figure out who killed the Scarlet Witch began. But, we’re expecting a lot of twists and turns before this one is over.

Early Review: Primordial #1

Primordial #1
Primordial #1, cover by Andrea Sorrentino

The Space Race between the Soviets and the Americans during the 1960s has always been fertile ground for conspiracy-centric storytelling, ripe with classic sci-fi concepts and ideas informed by a long tradition of weird fiction. Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s new book, Primordial, is firmly set within that tradition, but what it’s managed to produce on the visual front is what truly stands out as special.

Primordial follows a black electrical engineer from MIT called Dr. Pembrook, a man who’s interest in an American space mission where monkeys were shot into space to test travel by shuttle leads him to a secret report about the operation’s hasty cancellation that questions whether the alleged failure of the project was fact or an elaborate fiction to cover something up.

Pembrook’s discovery pushed him down the rabbit hole into conspiracy territory, led by a question that instantly makes the story take a whole new spin: what if the animal shuttle flights revealed something that scared everyone into not pursing further travel?

Lemire’s script perfectly captures the nail-biting paranoia that tends to be a staple in these types of stories, but when things get cosmic, it’s Sorrentino who steps up and steals the spotlight. It works because Lemire allows the plot to unravel in two spaces, if you will, in which Pembrook’s side is allowed to develop on its own while the animals’ flight is also given room to present its trajectory.

Primordial #1
Primordial #1

The more traditional, almost spy-thriller aspects of the story belong to Pembrook while the all-out sci-fi part of the equation is afforded to the animals. Sorrentino capitalizes on the setup to let loose in what can only be described as pure and unfiltered creativity, especially when it comes to the space travel sequences.

Panel work in these sections of the book break with structure and form to reach a higher level of visual play that ranges from panel collisions to colors flying off into unexpected parts of the page. It all combines to create a sense of wonder and even fear that frames the animals’ experience as a complete transformation of the rules of physics that will transport them to uniquely unknown places.

It tips its hat to Jack Kirby sci-fi, but it also borrows from classic rock and prog album cover art to breath life into many of the surprises the book viscerally throws at its readers as the story’s pacing picks up. In other words, Primordial is a visual marvel, a feast for the eyes that’s hard not to get lost in.

Dave Stewart’s coloring is largely responsible for the visuals’ triumphs as well. The book is bright and it captures the kind of naïve optimism that tends to characterize attempts at space travel. It makes for an experience in which the unknown is given a chance to reveal itself and to pose questions that go beyond what’s seen. Stewart’s work elevates that idea and gives it new dimensions.

Primordial #1 possesses a very exciting and intense sense of discovery and exploration that rests on the notion that secrets and conspiracies can generate quite a set of sense-shattering images. It’s a supreme example of what can be achieved with visual storytelling and how comics can offer narrative possibilities other mediums can only hope to imagine.

Story: Jeff Lemire Art: Andrea Sorrentino Colors: Dave Stewart
Story: 9.0 Art: 10 Recommendation: Read and make sure to give comics to space animals for their voyages

Primordial #1 will be available at comic shops on Wednesday, September 15.


Pre-Order: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino Launch Primordial in September

Green Arrow, Old Man Logan, and Eisner Award-winning Gideon Falls’ creative team Jeff Lemire and artist Andrea Sorrentino will reunite for an all-new, upcoming six-issue miniseries titled, Primordial. This mind-bending sci-fi/Cold War thriller mashup will launch from Image Comics this September.

Primordial reveals to readers that In 1957, the USSR launched the dog, Laika, into Earth’s orbit. Two years later, the USA responded with two monkeys, Able and Baker. These animals never returned. But, unbeknownst to everyone, they did not die in orbit…they were taken. And now they are coming home.

Primordial #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, September 15:

  • Cover A by Sorrentino – Diamond Code JUL210009   
  • Cover B by Christian Ward – Diamond Code JUL210010
  • Cover C by Dustin Nguyen – Diamond Code JUL210011
  • Cover D by Yuko Shimizu – Diamond Code JUL210012 
  • Cover E blank – Diamond Code JUL210013
  • Cover F (1:25) virgin incentive copy – Diamond Code JUL210014
  • Cover G (1:50) raw virgin B&W incentive copy – Diamond Code JUL210015
  • Cover H (1:75) Moon Footprint incentive copy – Diamond Code JUL210016 
  • Cover I (1:100) incentive copy by Lemire – Diamond Code JUL210017
Primordial #1
Zeismic