Tag Archives: phoenix

X-Men Phoenix Green Glow-in-the-Dark Pop! Vinyl Figure – Entertainment Earth Exclusive

  • Entertainment Earth Exclusive!
  • Dark Phoenix glows in the dark!
  • Jane Grey in her classic comic book green-and-gold suit.
  • Add this one-of-a-kind Pop! Vinyl figure to your X-Men collection!

Entertainment Earth Exclusive! A mutant with immense cosmic powers is ready to join your X-Men collection. Before turning into the brutal Dark Phoenix, the Phoenix Force came to Jean Grey’s aid, emerging in a green-and-gold suit like you see here. Positively radiating power, this exclusive Pop! Vinyl literally glows in the dark! The X-Men Phoenix Green Glow-in-the-Dark Pop! Vinyl Figure – Entertainment Earth Exclusive measures approximately 3 3/4-inches tall and comes packaged in a window display box. You don’t need to be an Omega-level mutant with telepathic and telekinetic powers to bring this fantastic figure home. Simply place your order now! 

Review: X-Men Grand Design- Second Genesis #1

X-MEN GRAND DESIGN SECOND GENESIS #1 (OF 2)Cartoonist Ed Piskor leaves the Silver Age and enters the Chris Claremont, Dave Cockrum, and John Byrne era in X-Men Grand Design: Second Genesis #1 retelling the story of the X-Men from Cyclops and Professor X’s assembly of the “All-New, All-Different” team of Storm, Wolverine, Colossus, Nightcrawler, Thunderbird, and Sunfire to rescue the original X-Men from the mutant island Krakoa to the conclusion of the classic “Dark Phoenix Saga”. The comic’s biggest strength is Piskor’s meticulous attention to craft including panel layouts and lengths, color choices, and lettering. With so much material to cover, there are no wasted beats in his storytelling, no filler. This does harm its emotional resonance which pales in comparison to Claremont’s original saga that partially worked because the longform storytelling created a connection between readers and characters and developed various relationships in more depth, like Wolverine and Nightcrawler, Jean Grey and Cyclops, and Professor X and Lilandra to name a few in this time period.

However, for the most part, Second Genesis #1 is beautiful, yet streamlined take on one of the most important pop culture icons from a talented writer/artist. Even though there are appearance from various secondary foes and antagonists and even mentions of and cameos from heavy hitters like Magneto and Galactus, Piskor establishes from page one that the Hellfire Club will be the chief opponent of the X-Men in Second Genesis while continuing the larger Ur-narrative of the Phoenix that he hinted at in the first volume of X-Men Grand Design. And the force or character that these two powers rotate around is Jean Grey and later the Phoenix force taking on the appearance of Jean Grey as Piskor agilely summarizes the retcon that allowed for Jean Grey’s “ressurection” and absolving of a murder of planets in a sequence of dark panels that show her go from a powerful mutant to almost a fetus. He even shows his horror chops in his recreation of the famous scene in the “Phoenix Saga” where Jean absorbs radiation and crash lands the X-Men team after they rescue Professor X from mutant hater and experimenter Stephen Lang. A classic countdown sequence combined with some shocked facial expressions builds the suspense that culminates in a firebird rising from Jamaica Bay.

Although Second Genesis #1 is much more plot-driven, and the best X-Men stories I would argue are more character driven (And Claremont managed to cram a lot of plots in too.), Ed Piskor still takes care to flesh out the individual X-Men’s flaws, personality traits, and memorable moments. There’s a baseball game with Nightcrawler playing catcher, early in the book, Colossus and Wolverine link up in a trademark fastball special, and there’s even a panel with Storm’s claustrophobia. Piskor writes and draws Kitty Pryde as plucky and ingenious without being annoying and accidentally saving the X-Men with her phasing ability as Claremont and Byrne were trying to finish off their great epic while also introducing an actual student for the Xavier institute per editorial mandate. She adds bursts of joy and energy between the shadow and flame of Dark Phoenix and whited out psychic duels between Mastermind and Cyclops. The Phoenix and Hellfire Club predominantly take center stage while Professor X’s deal with Lilandra and Shi’ar runs off to the side, and even though some of my favorite X-Men were on this incarnation of the team, they lack a strong identity unlike the original five plus Havok and Polaris in X-Men Grand Design.

Don’t get me wrong. For all its flaws in the characterization department (For example, Piskor puts Professor X and Cyclops at a graveyard at the top of the page, and Thunderbird’s death at the bottom and barely hints at his headstrong nature.) and lack of focus on the Jean/Scott dynamic when Jean is at the center of the story, Second Genesis #1 is the rare mainstream comic created auteur style by a single creator. Ed Piskor gives the subplot heavy, soap operatic narrative of the X-Men a strong thread to follow and lets his nostalgia and love for the source material shine on every page. His art style is retro without being simplistic, and there is a kind of minimalism to his use of captions and dialogue, especially compared to the overwrought style of Claremont. In fact, his strongest emotional beats involve few words at all like Jean and Scott spending one last night in bed before the X-Men’s honor duel against the Shi’ar, and he punctuates these emotional crescendos with the use of black and white instead of the colorful costumes, spaceships, and energy bursts that permeate this book and the X-Men canon as a whole.

Even if it focuses more on singular narrative building than the growth of one of superhero comics’ greatest ensemble casts, X-Men Grand Design: Second Genesis #1 is a wonderful example of the cyclical nature of myth as Ed Piskor filters the beginning of Chris Claremont’s run on X-Men through a lean, visually striking storyteller’s lens or his childhood fantasies through a steadier, yet no less energetic hand. I’d probably rather reread the “Dark Phoenix Saga” though.

Story/Art/Letters: Ed Piskor
Story: 7.2 Art: 9.0 Overall: 7.6 Recommendation: Read

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Celebrate Jean Grey With Specially Priced True Believers: Phoenix Comics!

The celebration of Jean Grey’s return continues! This winter, fans can relive some of their favorite Phoenix classics with a line of Phoenix-themed True Believers comics, available only at your local comic book shops.

Reproducing some of the most iconic Phoenix stories of all time at the suggested retail price of $1, True Believers are the perfect way for readers new and old to get caught up in the Phoenix phenomenon! Whether it’s your first time reading these memorable tales or your hundredth, you won’t want to miss this special celebration. Look for your favorite classic stories with new and colorful re-printings, including Phoenix Bizarre Adventures #27, which will be available to fans in color for the first time.

  • True Believers Phoenix Featuring Cyclops & Marvel Girl Reprinting X-Men (1963) #48
  • True Believers Enter The Phoenix Reprinting X-Men (1963) #101
  • True Believers Phoenix Returns Reprinting Fantastic Four (1961) #286
  • True Believers Phoenix Classic Reprinting Material From Classic X-Men #13 & #18
  • True Believers Phoenix Bizarre Adventures, First Time In Color, Reprinting Bizarre Adventures #27
  • True Believers Phoenix Vs Sabretooth Reprinting X-Men (1991) #28
  • True Believers Phoenix Wedding Reprinting X-Men (1991) #30
  • True Believers Phoenix What If Reprinting What If? (1977) #27
  • True Believers Death Of Phoenix Reprinting New X-Men (2001) #150
  • True Believers Phoenix Origins Reprinting X-Men Origins: Jean Grey #1

Be there this December when these exciting TRUE BELIEVERS issues come to comic shops!

Marvel Celebrates The Return of Jean Grey With Phoenix Variants

Following on the heels of the recently announced Phoenix Resurrection, Marvel’s new epic featuring the return of adult Jean Grey, Marvel has announced it will continue the celebration of Jean Grey’s reappearance in the Marvel Universe with a variant cover program. Featuring acclaimed artists such as Jen Bartel, Kris Anka, David Nakayama, RB Silva and Elizabeth Torque, Marvel welcomes Jean Grey back with the help of some of the most exciting artists in the comic industry.

Look for Marvel’s Phoenix variant covers on these select titles this December:

  1. ALL NEW WOLVERINE #28 by Jen Bartel
  2. AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #792 by Ryan Stegman
  3. ASTONISHING X-MEN #6 by Kris Anka
  4. AVENGERS 674 by Brent Shoonover
  5. BLACK PANTHER #168 by Ken Lashley
  6. CAPTAIN AMERICA #695 by Ron Lim
  7. CHAMPIONS #15 by Elizabeth Torque
  8. DAREDEVIL #596 by David Lopez
  9. DESPICABLE DEADPOOL #290 by RB Silva
  10. FALCON #3 by David Nakayama
  11. GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #148 by Erica Henderson
  12. INCREDIBLE HULK #711 by Dan Mora
  13. IRON FIST #74 by TBD
  14. MIGHTY THOR #702 by Kris Anka
  15. OLD MAN LOGAN #32 by Chris Burnham
  16. SHE-HULK #160 by Ben Caldwell
  17. SPIDER-GWEN #27 by Yasmine Putri
  18. SPIRITS OF VENGEANCE #3 by Francesco Mattina
  19. THANOS #14 by Rahzzah
  20. THE PUNISHER #219 by Sanford Greene
  21. VENOM #159 by Tyler Crook

Entertainment Earth Spotlight: X-Men Marvel Legends Wave 1 & Deadpool

The X-Men Marvel Legends 6-Inch Action Figures Wave 1 brings your mutant favorites to life in a stunning 6-inch scale action figure form. Each figure includes awesome accessories and amazing detail, plus a build-a-figure piece. Ages 4 and up.Case features 8 individually packaged action figures, including:

A case features 8 individually packaged action figures, including, Wolverine, Deadpool, Rogue, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Cable, Havok, and Phoenix, plus the build-a-figure Juggernaut!

The figures are hard to find so you can get the entire wave through Entertainment Earth! Or, if you want a specific character, you can do that too!

x-men-marvel-legends-6-inch-action-figures-wave-1

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

VIZ Media Details New Digital Manga Updates for April

image001VIZ Media welcomes the beginning of Spring with a fresh round of digital manga. Shojo fans will not want to miss the launch of creator Bisco Hatori’s acclaimed wistful romance, Millennium Snow, available now.

Notable updates to a variety of other popular ongoing series also include the latest volumes – available now – for: Bleach (Vol. 60), Dragon Ball Full Color (Vol. 2), Deadman Wonderland (Vol. 2), Sweet Rein (Vol. 2), Naruto (Vol. 65), Toriko (Vol. 21); Happy Marriage (Vol. 5) is also available (only on VIZManga.com and select partner platforms). All of these editions launch digitally the same day as print. April 15th will also see the debut of the latest digital-exclusive edition of the hard-hitting superhero action series, One-Punch Man (Vol. 2).

DeadmanWonderland-GN02

These titles complement additions to more than 16 other popular manga series and will also feature special multi-volume updates for Boys Over Flowers (8 new vols.), Firefighter! (2 new vols.), Knights of the Zodiac (7 new vols.), Phoenix (3 new vols.), and Whistle! (5 new vols.). Two additional weekly updates will follow on April 22nd and 29th.

MILLENNIUM SNOW, Vol. 1

Rated ‘T’ for Teens·
MSRP: $6.99 (U.S. / CAN) ·Available Now!

MILLENNIUM SNOW is a celebrated shojo manga series created by Bisco Hatori. Seventeen-year-old Chiyuki Matsuoka was born with heart problems, and her doctors say she won’t live to see the next snow. Toya is an 18-year-old vampire who hates blood and refuses to make the traditional partnership with a human, whose life-giving blood would keep them both alive for a thousand years. Chiyuki makes the most of the time she has left, even though things aren’t that exciting–until she comes across the reluctant vampire late one chilly night. Can Chiyuki teach Toya to feel passion for life, even as her own is ending?

MillenniumSnow_Vol1_Cover-sm

 

Catching Up on Reviews, Part 12 — Wolverine & Family

Sorry about the delays, but I’m still trying to get caught up on reviews for the last few months…

Daken – Dark Wolverine #6 (Marvel) – This is a consistently well-made comic. Daken isn’t my favorite character, but he is always interesting and there is a lot of room for good writers to explore him. Daniel Way and Marjorie Liu tell a good tale here.

Story: 9 Art: 8 Overall: 8.5

Daken – Dark Wolverine #7 (Marvel) – I’m not a big fan of Madripoor stories and have never really liked them, but if a character more fits into the setting than Daken, I’m not sure who it is.

Story: 8 Art: 7 Overall: 7.5

Daken – Dark Wolverine #8 (Marvel) – For me the jury is still out on whether or not X-23 is a good character, but I definitely do not like Gambit. It makes sense to have Daken and X-23 interact, though, so this storyline isn’t without merit.

Story: 7 Art: 8.5 Overall: 7.75

Daken – Dark Wolverine #9 (Marvel) – Not sure I’m fully on board with this Daken-X-23 crossover, but there is a lot of great art in this issue from Marco Checchetto.

Story: 7 Art: 9 Overall: 8

Daken – Dark Wolverine #9.1 (Marvel) – There is still a lot of room to explore the relationship between Daken and Wolverine and this is a good entry into the ongoing story.

Story: 9 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.75

Daken – Dark Wolverine #10 (Marvel) – The execution here isn’t perfect, but there are a lot of things to like in this issue. Rob Williams introduces Daken to a drug addiction that is brilliantly shown by artists Matteo Buffagni and Riley Rossmo. The issue also introduces a great new female character, Donna Kiel, an FBI agent on Daken’s trail. I’d like to see her used a lot more.

Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8

Daken – Dark Wolverine #11 (Marvel) – Basically following up on all the elements of the previous issue, this one executes them a bit better and adds Taskmaster, one of my favorite Marvel characters of late, to the mix. I’m a fan.

Story: 8.5 Art: 8 Overall: 8.25

Daken – Dark Wolverine #12 (Marvel) – Buffagni and Rossmo’s art is adequate during the regular story, but stellar during the scenes where Daken is on heat. Williams story continues to get even better, with Daken setting up a complex heist plan that is very original and then has Donna Kiel figure it out.

Story: 9 Art: 8 Overall: 8.5

Daken – Dark Wolverine #13 (Marvel) – Adding Moon Night and the questionable portrayal of his mental illness to the mix doesn’t really help, but it doesn’t really hurt, either.

Story: 8.5 Art: 8 Overall: 8.25

Daken – Dark Wolverine #14 (Marvel) – This is a complex and entertaining story and I can’t wait until the next issue comes out so I can figure out what the hell is happening.

Story: 9 Art: 8 Overall: 8.5

Wolverine – Deadpool: The Decoy #1 (Marvel) – I’m trying to figure out a reason this story was published and I’m drawing a blank. The main story, meant, I guess, to reinforce all the same qualities of Wolverine and Deadpool we’ve seen a million times. The back-up story with the Great Lakes Initiative is designed, I think, to make you feel less crappy about wasting money on this comic. It doesn’t work.

Story: 6 Art: 6.5 Overall: 6.25

Wolverine: Debt of Death #1 (Marvel) – This isn’t a bad story, but it doesn’t really add anything new to the long tale of Wolverine and it seems overly familiar, as if we’ve read this story before. David Aja’s art is very nice, though, and it’s worth a look.

Story: 7 Art: 9 Overall: 8

Wolverine: The Best There Is # (Marvel) – I’m not sure why they don’t just call this Wolverine MAX, since that’s what it is. Which means pointless and excessive violence, sexual references and bad jokes. Juan Jose Ryp’s art is way too busy and cartoonish for me and it seems out of sync with the story.

Story: 6 Art: 5 Overall: 5.5

Wolverine: The Best There Is #5 (Marvel) – This one is a little better than the previous Contagion chapters, but not by much.

Story: 7 Art: 5 Overall: 6

Wolverine: The Best There Is #6 (Marvel) – If this series didn’t star Wolverine, one of my all-time favorite characters, I would’ve stopped reading it long ago, since the quality is poor and the intent behind that low quality isn’t that great in the first place.

Story: 6 Art: 5 Overall: 5.5

Wolverine: The Best There Is #7 (Marvel) – This is probably Ryp’s best art in the series to date and now that the story is moving away from Contagion, it’s much better. Wolverine’s recovery from his full range of diseases is the best the series has been to date.

Story: 9 Art: 7 Overall: 8

Wolverine: The Best There Is #8 (Marvel) – Ryp’s art continues to improve and there are a lot of good panels in this comic, despite much of it still being too cluttered and busy. The story isn’t bad, but I’m not sure it’s holding my interest.

Story: 6 Art: 7.5 Overall: 6.75

Wolverine: The Best There Is #9 (Marvel) – Whatever momentum the series had been gaining in recent issues, this is a setback for it. It looks bad and the story is dull and offensive

Story: 5 Art: 6 Overall: 5.5

Wolverine #5.1 (Marvel) – Pretty creative tale here, as you have all of Wolverine’s friends getting together for a suprise birthday party that Logan, of course, can’t make it to because he’s caught up in a Wrong Turn-style story. Very entertaining tale from Jason Aaron.

Story: 9 Art: 8 Overall: 17

Wolverine #6 (Marvel) – The aftermath of the “Logan Goes to Hell” story is interesting, particularly with the look into Scott Summers’ brain and the heavy load he carries in terms of having to plan to take out all of the members of his race if they were to get too powerful and go down the wrong track. The “Wolverine Protocols” is an idea that is traceable back to the Dark Phoenix saga and is good writing again from Aaron.

Story: 9 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.75

Wolverine #7 (Marvel) – Daniel Acuna’s art is at its best here and Aaron continues to show he’s a name that should be quickly rising up the ranks of comic book writers. Logan’s internal battle here is as well-done as the external combat against his teammates.

Story: 9.5 Art: 9 Overall: 9.25

Wolverine #8 (Marvel) – Another great issue, this one has some of the funniest moments in Wolverine history and it’s great to see characters like Nightcrawler and Phoenix back, even if they are only in Logan’s head. The ending is also a pretty chilling moment.

Story: 10 Art: 9 Overall: 9.5

Wolverine #9 (Marvel) – Wolverine vs. Mystique seems a story we’ve seen enough times already that we don’t need to really see it again. That being said, the creative team on this comic is good enough to make any tale, even one retold this often, fresh enough.

Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5

Wolverine #10 (Marvel) – The art isn’t as good this time around, but this is an intriguing opening chapter to a good Wolverine story.

Story: 8.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 8.25

Wolverine #11 (Marvel) – Some of the characters here are not my favorites, but the story structure is good and gets you a lot of information that will pay off later.

Story: 8.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 8.25

Wolverine #12 (Marvel) – This series is very consistent at this point, with great writing, art that is good enough and beautiful covers by Jae Lee et al.

Story: 8.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 8.25

Wolverine #13 (Marvel) – This story keeps getting better and better. It’s a revenge tale aimed at Wolverine for his past sins. The mystery is that there is something bigger going on here than what we know at this point and the cliffhanger ending here leaves you very intrigued.

Story: 9.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.5

Wolverine #14 (Marvel) – If the art was a bit better here, I’d consider this a perfect comic. That being said it’s still one of the most shocking endings to a Wolverine story ever, and that’s saying a lot. No one could’ve predicted where this tale was headed.

Story: 10 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.75

Wolverine #15 (Marvel) – It’s hard to follow up a shocking story like the previous issue and not have a let down, but Aaron manages to pull it off. The art doesn’t measure up, though. Kevin Smith and John Romita Jr.’s 9/11 back-up story is amazing.

Story: 9.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.5

X-23 #6 (Marvel) – X-23, Gambit, Mr./Miss Sinister, art that is pretty good, story that isn’t groundbreaking. Meh.

Story: 7 Art: 7 Overall: 7

X-23 #7 (Marvel) – The art here is a bit better, even if it is too anime for my tastes. The story has Gambit and pirates, so, in other words, not much going for it.

Story: 6 Art: 7.5 Overall: 6.75

X-23 #8 (Marvel) – This one looks a lot better and bringing in Daken is a good idea, but it still seems like the series isn’t really exploring the character the way it should and could.

Story: 7 Art: 8 Overall: 7.5

X-23 #9 (Marvel) – Marjorie Liu’s best writing in this series to date is matched up with continually improving art. Now if they’d just get rid of Gambit.

Story: 8 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.25

X-23 #10 (Marvel) – Back to Sana Takeda’s anime-style art and an appearance by Wolverine and vampire Jubilee make this issue passable, but not great.

Story: 7 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.25

X-23 #11 (Marvel) – Takeda’s art is a bit better here and the vampire-themed tale is mildly interesting.

Story: 7.5 Art: 8 Overall: 7.75

X-23 #12 (Marvel) – This is Takeda’s best art on the series and the vampire story really kicks it up a notch here. This is the best issue of the series to date.

Story: 9 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.75

X-23 #13 (Marvel) – Phil Noto brings a pretty different style to the issue’s look and Liu brings in more guest stars, this time Spider-Man and the FF. I’d like to see some of these issues get rid of the crossovers and focus on developing X-23 on her own.

Story: 8 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.75

X-23 #14 (Marvel) – This really much more of an FF issue than an X-23 issue and taken that way, it’s not bad. The final panel is awe-inspiring. I’m still disappointed that we aren’t getting enough X-23 in her own comic.

Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8

Atlas Comics Returns


Bookmark and Share

Jason Goodman, the grandson of Marvel founder Martin Goodman, is bringing back Atlas Comics.  The comic company was originally launched in the 1970’s by his grandfather to compete with Marvel.

From ICV2:

According to industry legends Martin Goodman sold Marvel to Cadence Publications in the early 1970s with the understanding that Goodman’s son Chip would stay on as editorial director of Marvel.  When Stan Lee, with Cadence’s backing, showed Chip the door, Martin Goodman launched what historians now refer to as Atlas/Seaboard Comics to distinguish it from the 1950s Atlas Comics, which was one of the precursor companies to Marvel Comics.  When Goodman sold Marvel, he kept the rights to the Atlas name, and dusted it off in the mid-1970s to compete with Marvel and DC.

It is believed a formal announcement will occur at New York Comic Con, but the company claims to have the rights to hundreds of characters.

Deadline Hollywood is reporting that Brendan Deneen, a former development executive for Scott Rudin and Harvey Weinstein, who is now an editor at St. Martin’s Press/Macmillan, is “spearheading the relaunch,’ and comics industry veteran, J.M. DeMatteis will be the new company’s EIC.

The first two titles that the new company are Phoenix and The Grim Ghost.

« Older Entries