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Blade Runner Origins #1 Gets a Variant by Peach Momoko

Enter the world of Blade Runner: 2009 and Discover the untold origins of the Blade Runners!

A Tyrell Corporation scientist is DEAD – the victim of an apparent suicide. But when LAPD Detective Cal is called in to investigate, he uncovers secret documents revealing a new kind of replicant and a conspiracy that could change the world.

On February 24, 2021, Blade Runner Origins #1 kicks off a whole new chapter from writers K. Perkins, Mellow Brown, and Mike Johnson, and art by Fernando Dagnino.

The first issue features a newly revealed variant by Peach Momoko which you can see below!

Blade Runner Origins #1 Peach Momoko variant

Titan Reveals a First Look at Artwork for Blade Runner Origins #1

Blade Runner Origins launches in February 2021 and Titan Comics has revealed a first look at the interior artwork for this new series by Fernando Dagnino. The series is being written by DC Comics veteran K. Perkins and screenwriter Mellow Brown with the award-winning co-writer of Titan’s Blade Runner 2019 Mike Johnson providing script supervision.

Commenting on what it has been like working on the series so far Fernando Dagnino stated “The cyber noir world developed in this masterpiece movie has forged my imagination ever since I was a kid. As an artist I feel privileged to be expanding this dark and complex universe and honored to be part of it´s history contributing,  together with a fantastic team of creators, to imagine this unique prequel that will not only answer questions to the origins of the series but it also links as any speculative SCI-FI story should with modern-day conflicts and concerns.”

A senior bioengineer for the Tyrell Corp is found hanging in her sealed laboratory, the victim of an apparent suicide. LAPD Detective Cal Moreaux—a war-scarred veteran of the bloody Off-world conflict known as Kalanthia, as depicted in the “Blackout 2022” Blade Runner anime—is sent to write it up, quickly, quietly and with the minimum of fuss. But something doesn’t sit right with the detective, and it soon becomes apparent that this is anything but a “normal” suicide. Did the scientist’s ground-breaking research on Nexus-model Replicants somehow contribute to her death? And is the apparent disappearance of a prototype Nexus unit also connected to the case? Det. Moreaux’s investigation will draw him into a dark conspiracy behind Dr. Tyrell’s Replicant empire.

Blade Runner Origins #1 will debut with a selection of amazing variant covers, including artwork by artists Peach MomokoStanley “Artgerm” Lau, a set of retro pulp-style covers by Robert Hack as well as covers by Piotr Kowalski and series artist Fernando Dagnino. It comes to shelves on February 24, 2021.

Blade Runner Origins #1

Titan Reveals Character Sketches and All the Covers For Blade Runner Origins #1

Following the announcement by Titan Comics and Alcon Media Group that a brand new series Blade Runner Origins will be launching on February 24, 2021, they have now revealed the full cover line-up for issue 1 of this new title as well as a first look at two characters from this new series.

Blade Runner Origins is being writtern by DC Comics veteran K. Perkins, and screenwriter Mellow Brown with the award-winning co-writer of Titan’s Blade Runner 2019 Mike Johnson providing script supervision.

Blade Runner Origins
LAPD Detective Cal Moreaux – a war-scarred veteran of the bloody Off-world conflict, called in to investigate the apparent suicide of a Tyrell Corporation scientist
Blade Runner Origins
Ilora Stahl – an executive at the Tyrell Corporation. She’s the head of the research division into Replicant behaviour and the transference of memories.

A senior bioengineer for the Tyrell Corp is found hanging in her sealed laboratory, the victim of an apparent suicide. LAPD Detective Cal Moreaux—a war-scarred veteran of the bloody Off-world conflict known as Kalanthia, as depicted in the “Blackout 2022” Blade Runner anime—is sent to write it up, quickly, quietly and with the minimum of fuss. But something doesn’t sit right with the detective, and it soon becomes apparent that this is anything but a “normal” suicide. Did the scientist’s ground-breaking research on Nexus-model Replicants somehow contribute to her death? And is the apparent disappearance of a prototype Nexus unit also connected to the case? Det. Moreaux’s investigation will draw him into a dark conspiracy behind Dr. Tyrell’s Replicant empire.

Blade Runner Origins #1 will debut with a selection of amazing variant covers, including artwork by artists Peach MomokoStanley “Artgerm” Lau, a set of retro pulp-style covers by Robert Hack as well as covers by Piotr Kowalski and series artist Fernando Dagnino.

Titan Comics Reveals Blade Runner Origins #1!

Titan Comics and Alcon Media Group have announced the February 2021 debut of Blade Runner Origins. Set ten years before Titan’s current bestselling and award-winning Blade Runner 2019, the year-long comic book series will follow the events leading up to the creation of the Blade Runner division, reflecting the world, characters, and events first seen in the genre-defining films Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049.

A senior bioengineer for the Tyrell Corp is found hanging in her sealed laboratory, the victim of an apparent suicide. LAPD Detective Cal Moreaux—a war-scarred veteran of the bloody Off-world conflict known as Kalanthia, as depicted in the “Blackout 2022” Blade Runner anime—is sent to write it up, quickly, quietly and with the minimum of fuss. But something doesn’t sit right with the detective, and it soon becomes apparent that this is anything but a “normal” suicide. Did the scientist’s ground-breaking research on Nexus-model Replicants somehow contribute to her death? And is the apparent disappearance of a prototype Nexus unit also connected to the case? Det. Moreaux’s investigation will draw him into a dark conspiracy behind Dr. Tyrell’s Replicant empire.

The Blade Runner Origins series is being helmed by Mike Johnson, the award-winning co-writer of Titan’s Blade Runner 2019, joined here by DC Comics veteran K. Perkins, and screenwriter Mellow Brown.

Origins #1 will debut with a selection of amazing variant covers, including artwork by superstar artists Stanley “Artgerm” Lau and Peach Momoko, as well as a set of retro pulp-style covers by Robert Hack, plus much more!

Blade Runner Origins #1 is set for release in comic stores and digital devices on February 24, 2021.

Blade Runner Origins #1

Exclusive Preview: Superwoman #17

Superwoman #17

Written by: K. Perkins
Art by: Art Thibert, Stephen Segovia
Cover by: Ken Lashley
Variant cover by: Emanuela Lupacchino
U.S. Price: $3.99
On Sale Date: December 13, 2017

“THE MIDNIGHT HOUR” part three! An inextricable link between Superwoman and the villainous Midnight may be the only hope in stopping the destruction of Metropolis. Raging with the power to swallow cities or entire planets into the black hole inside her, Midnight looms for Superwoman. Can she make it to dawn?

Exclusive Preview: Superwoman #13

Superwoman #13

Written by: K. Perkins
Art by: Art Thibert, Stephen Segovia
Cover by: Ken Lashley
Variant cover by: Renato Guedes
U.S. Price: $3.99
On Sale Date: August 9, 2017

“RETURN TO SMALLVILLE!” Searching for an explanation of the source of her powers, Lana traces her steps back to high school with a teenage Clark Kent in Smallville. With Lana’s role as Superwoman hanging in the balance, Lex Luthor makes an unexpected appearance.

Preview: Superwoman #9

Superwoman #9

Written by: K. Perkins
Art by: Art Thibert, Stephen Segovia
Cover by: Billy Tan
Variant cover by: Renato Guedes

“SUPER WOMEN” part one! In this story tying in to “Superman Reborn Aftermath,” Lois Lane and Lana Lang find themselves reunited at last! Along with the Man of Steel, their reunion is cut short by the return of Cannon and Saber, who arrive to wreak havoc on the newly restored Metropolis. The mantle of Superwoman will be decided in this debut chapter of “Super Women”!

Review: Supergirl #37

Supergirl 037There has been an interesting trend at DC Comics in the past year.  Instead of portraying its young adult and new adult heroines as hopeless children, it has started to show more characterization, dealing with problems that might actually affect them, in addition to dealing with superheroics.  With Supergirl it seems as though the same approach is being taken, though due to the nature of the character it is perhaps not as pronounced.  This goes back to the same problems that all of the Super characters have lobbied against them, namely that with so many superlatives next to their names and their powers, that there is just not as much to draw the reader in.  The characters are never really threatened who cannot be harmed, and while some readers still adore these characters, others find the lack of a real threat to be boring.

What has worked so well for instance for Batgirl is thus a little dulled down here.  Supergirl is still on the Crucible and even though its true nature is not yet revealed, it would seem as though something is not right about it.  This is still an engaging environment for her, only just not as engaging as those faced by either Batgirl or Olive Silverlock.  At the same time, for the first time since Siobhan, there are supporting characters in this series that have more going for them than being stock secondary characters, and there are even two, in Tsavo and Maxima.   Tsavo particularly plays an important part in this issue as his background comes back to haunt him and he is forced to intervene on his home planet with his new allies.

The end result is an issue which shows that this series is moving in the right direction.  So often in this series it has felt like the character was waiting inside her own universe for some kind of purposeful meaning, and it seems as though it might finally be finding it over three years later. I thought that the cover was clever as well, as though it seems to be a representation of Kara’s search for an identity, it is actually tied into the issue in an interesting way.  This is not the best material that DC has to offer, but it is still a fun read and every issue seems to be getting better, and for those that have been waiting for a good time to finally pick up this title, this might be the start.

Story: K. Perkins and Mike Johnson Art: Ema Lupacchino
Story: 8.3 Art: 8.8 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Read

Review: Supergirl #36

supergirl coverAs one of the outliers in the Superman titles, Supergirl often gets the worst treatment of them all.  Throughout 35 issues the character has struggled to find a singular direction in its stories and character development, instead often getting caught up in the Superman crossovers.  While the initial issues were going along well enough, it eventually got stopped in its tracks by the H’el story arc, and once the series seemed to have recovered from that it was thrown into the Doomed story line.

Below it all is an engaging character that all too often has her character development thrown out the window for the sake of some easy cross-coverage.  While that is not exactly the case here, it is clear that the Superman titles cannot just leave the character alone, which is evident here even in the words of Supergirl, asking to be left alone as she addresses Kal.  There is incidentally relatively few moments in comics where reality imitates art as well as this.  Much as with Batgirl in the Bat-titles, the character of Supergirl really needs some space in order to grow into something more than just another tie-in to bigger Superman stories.  By the end of this issue that starts to take shape, but it is at the expense of other recent developments (such as her budding romance from the other recent issues.)  What happens here at the end is to throw Supergirl into yet another offshoot of her own story lines, once again drawn into space beyond her control, but this story arc at least looks to be engaging (including re-introducing Maxima.)

What happens is that the series once again seems to have some promise to stand on its own, something that it didn’t have since the first year of its stories.  While readers and fans of the character might be waiting a long time for some eventual stability within this title as opposed to outside interference, it would appear that this might be that issue where it starts, even if Superman is here for about two pages.  As one of the few titles featuring a female superhero, this title could definitely use the attention which it deserves from both the fans and the creators, but it is to the creators to make that happen, and hopefully this will be the first step.

Story: K. Perkins and Mike Johnson Art: Emanuela Lupacchino
Story: 8.5 Art: 9 Overall: 8.6 Recommendation: Buy