Tag Archives: jason muhr

Those Two Geeks Episode Twenty Three: There

On the docket this week: The geeks use fancy editing to cobble together an interview with Markisan Naso and Jason Muhr, the writer and artist of the indie book Voracious. With the Kickstarter for the third volume launching today, the geeks thought it’d  be a great idea to sit down and talk about the Kickstarter, the variant cover rewards, and the comic itself.

We hope you enjoy the interview as much as we did recording it.

You can back the project on Kickstarter now.

As always, the Alex and Joe can be found on twitter respectively @karcossa and @jc_hesh if you feel the need to tell them they’re wrong individually, or @those2geeks if you want to yell at them together on twitter or email ItsThose2Geeks@gmail.com.

Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next week in the future!

Underrated: Voracious

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of Voracious_TPB_Cover_Vol1comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Voracious.


This week I wanted to take a look at a series that I think epitomizes what this column is about: a great comic book series or story that too few people have read. Published by Action Lab, Voracious is written by Markisan Naso and drawn by Jason Muhr, with the co-creators being joined by colourist Andrei Tabucaru, and can usually grab your attention with the shortest of descriptions: “time travelling chef makes dinosaur sandwiches.”

It sounds awesome, right? Well, that’s because it is.

In an ideal world, that’s really all you would need to rush out and buy the two trade paper back collections (Diners, Dinosaurs & Dives and Feeding Time), but it can be tough to buy two trades wholly on those words – I get that. I really do. Look, it’s no secret that Voracious is one of my favourite series to come out in the last couple of years (you can find the reviews for most of the comics in the two miniseries under this search),  and it’s one of the few that I’ll buy in floppy form after reading the review copies – and it’s the Voracious_TPB_Cover_Vol1only one that I also buy the TPBs as well.

You see, I put my money where my mouth is because Voracious is a wonderful breath of fresh air in an industry that has been choking on relaunches and rehashes; the five issues that make up Feeding Time are some of the highest scored comics that I have reviewed for Graphic Policy. Voracious does have an awesome elevator pitch, but that’s not what draws me into the series (though it certainly helped).

After only nine comics (technically ten, but the first issue was a double sized comic) Markisan Naso has become one of Those writers who has earned my complete and utter trust; I will probably buy anything that he puts out from this point on. Aside from having an excellent music taste, Naso has an ability to give a unique voice to his characters that when combined with Jason Muhr’s artistic ability allows you to understand all you need to know about a character within a page or two at most. Yes, there are deeper layers to the people you’re watching navigate their lives on the page, and they’re expertly revealed as the series progresses in a way that you’re never really subjected to an-out-of-left-field moment that takes you out of the story because of a character’s actions because of how well developed they are; you won’t be shocked at the actions of the people in the comic because it all seems so in character for them once you understand their motivations.

As with any well written story featuring time travel you hope the visuals measure up to the intricacies of the story, and oh boy do they ever.Voracious_02-8

Jason Muhr is a brilliant visual story teller; there are so many brilliant double page spreads where his talents shine, and yet some of my favourite moments are the ones where Muhr focuses in on the emotions playing across the face of the character he is drawing; obviously I want to avoid significant spoilers so I’m not showing you as many pages from later issues, which is a disservice to both you and Muhr because as the series progressed he really found his groove.

If you’re tired of reading about superheroes fighting each other and you want a story to take you across the emotional spectrum without the use of glowing rings then you need look no further. While the comic is about a time traveling, dinosaur hunting chef, it’s also a powerful look into what makes us who we are and how. It’s a story about mistakes and loss, and most importantly coping with those things.

Voracious is the best comic you’ve never read, so change that. I haven’t heard a singe person I’ve made read the book complain in anyway. This story is what comics are all about; a masterpiece of visual story telling that couldn’t be told any other way even half as effectively as it is in comic form.

Now, excuse me while I go and read both trades again.

If you want more Voracious, then you can check out the episode of GP Radio where we talked all about the dinosaur sandwiches with both Markisan Naso and Jason Muhr.


Unless the comics industry ceases to exist this week, Underrated will return next week.

Review: Voracious: Feeding Time #5

voracious Feeding Time CoverI’ve been listening to a lot of Frank Carter and The Rattlesnakes lately, frequently playing the bands two albums in sequential order for hours on end through my headphones as I plug away at the Day Job and then as I walk home. I’ve described their music as akin to a pissed off Foo Fighters, but that doesn’t begin to do the chugging, fast paced groove laden songs any justice – the music has connected with me in a way that I can’t quite comprehend, and after listening to the two albums hundreds of times over the past couple of months, I’m showing no signs of fatigue. The music won’t be for everybody, and I’m well aware of that, but for me the two albums presently released represent just over an hour of the finest slice of anger and melody recorded. 

After only spending a few months with the music, I know that I’ll enjoy it for years to come.

I can just as easily say the exact same thing about Voracious.

There’s something about this series that has just clicked for me; the elevator pitch is usually enough to sell anybody on the story (time travelling chef hunts dinosaurs to serve in his diner), but after two miniseries that pitch doesn’t begin to do the story justice – and nor can I in a spoiler free review, because it’s hard for me to believe that this issue represents only the second time that Markisan Naso and Jason Muhr have finished a comic book miniseries. I don’t remember the last time that I read a story arc from either Marvel or DC that was told this well or illustrated as wonderfully as the first two chapters in the Voracious trilogy. Muhr’s layouts in the opening of this comic are wonderful; with a textless first page he tells a story that a thousand words would struggle to tell – I was genuinely in awe when reading the review copy, and were it not for a Diamond Distribution snafu with my LCS I’d have been sat staring at the comic already.

I’m always impressed when a page is laid out in an interestingly inventive way, and the first page of this comic is simple in it’s elegance – yet it’s all the stronger for it. But not only is Muhr on top form, but colourist Andrei Tabacaru brings the already great artwork into the level of sheer beauty that you don’t see as often as you’d like. I would recommend you buy this comic for the art alone, but Naso delivers another flawless issue. Honestly, at this point I’d be surprised if he didn’t.

This series has constantly impressed me over the course of it’s nine issues, and if memory serves, I don’t think I have ever rated a series as high as I have Voracious.  

Markisan Naso and Jason Muhr reminded me of why I loved comics with the first miniseries, and with Feeding Time they have reminded me of just how good sequential art can be. If this is what these men can do on their first and second story arc, then the industry can expect some bloody brilliant things from them in the future.

If I read a better series this year, then I’ll be shocked. Voracious: Feeding Time has set the bar pretty bloody high.

Story: Markisan Naso Art: Jason Muhr Colourist: Andrei Tabacaru
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Graphic Policy was provided a FREE copy for review, but I will be purchasing this issue when my LCS gets it in, as well as the trade.

Preview: Voracious: Feeding Time #5

VORACIOUS: FEEDING TIME #5

Writer(s): Markisan Naso
Artist Name(s): Jason Muhr
Cover Artist(s): Jason Muhr (Cover A), Markisan Naso (Cover B – 500 Copies)
32 pgs./ T+ / FC
$3.99 (reg.), $4.99 (var.)

Gus Horncrasher is determined to find Owen at any cost, but first he has to go through Captain Jim. Back in Blackfossil, the Sheriff begins to unravel Nate’s secrets, Starlee prepares to leave town and Maribel’s first encounter with Tony is revealed, as the second volume of VORACIOUS concludes.

Featuring a “Dead Leaves” variant cover by VORACIOUS writer Markisan Naso! Limited to just 500 copies!

Review: Voracious: Feeding Time #4

voracius feeding time 4The last issue of this comic knocked me down several times over. The creators were on the to of their game in every way; Markisan Naso‘s emotional story and character interactions gut punched me into next Thursday, only for Jason Muhr‘s art and layouts to bounce me through to the following TuesdayAndrei Tabacaru‘s coloring work was the cherry on top of an emotional thunder punch of a story that had me reeling for days afterwards. 

Voracious: Feeding Time #3 has a very real chance of remaining my favorite single issue of the year.

It therefore seems somewhat unfair to compare this issue to the last because the emotional roller coaster of issue three isn’t as immediately evident in the fourth issue, but before you start to think that makes Feeding Time #4 a lesser issue, stop. The fourth issue will still give you things to think about, albeit with a level of subtlety that requires you to give the issue some time to digest in your brain (unless you’re able to pick up on these things faster than I was).

With the fourth issue of the miniseries, Naso gives you a moment to catch your breath with a sequence that, despite the very science fiction setting and ominous overtones, evokes the same sense of innocence that Nate and Starlee’s banter does in earlier issues. Although there’s a much heavier taste of futuristic science fiction present in this issue the comic retains the distinctlyVoracious feel with it’s characterization and humanity. At first the conversations that the saurian scientists have in this issue and the earlier interactions between Nate and Starlee have very little in common with each other, but once you remove the context of each conversation the tone remains very familiar allowing the reader to gain a level of familiarity with these otherwise alien-to-us-beings on an instinctual level. 

Little touches like this are a prime reason as to why I am such a huge fan of the series; there are some brilliant moments in each issue that jump out at you the first time you read the comic, that you can sometimes miss the more subtle, but equally brilliant, moments littered throughout each comic. The fourth issue of Feeding Time was weighted toward the more subtler side of the coin, and although it did take me a second read to pick up, the comic is so much more if you give it time to percolate in your mind.

Jason Muhr and Andrei Tabacaru continue to deliver a visual treat with each issue, easily justifying the price of admission alone. Muhr is able to convey those unspoken words between characters, effortlessly moving the story along in the absence of words that showcases the synchronicity between the series creators as they continue to publish one of the most exciting books of the year.

I fucking love this book, and if you give it a chance then you will too.

Story: Markisan Naso Art: Jason Muhr Colours: Andrei Tabacaru
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.75 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Action Lab Entertainment provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Preview: Doctor Strange/The Punisher: Magic Bullets #5

Doctor Strange/The Punisher: Magic Bullets #5

(W) John Barber (A) Andrea Broccardo, Jason Muhr (CA) Michael Walsh
Rated T+
In Shops: Mar 22, 2017
SRP: $4.99

Using dark magic, a mobster family has transformed into monstrous beings of unbelievable power! With Doctor Strange working on being more grounded and the Punisher trying to adjust to magic, this mismatched pair has their work cut out for them.

Review: Voracious: Feeding Time #3

PrintMy first reaction upon reading this issue was, and I quote, Bloody Hell, Markisan. Bloody fucking Hell.

When was the last time you read a genuinely amazing comic that made your jaw drop so fast it nearly dislocated? For me it was ten minutes ago when I opened the PDF review copy of creators Markisan Naso and Jason Muhr’s Voracious: Feeding Time #3. It was an issue that I have been looking forward to for some time, and yet despite my high expectations, I was utterly blown away. I just…  it’s just so bloody awesome.

Markisan Naso has got to be one of the most exciting comic book writers to put pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard), and this is his second miniseries. He has an uncanny ability to convey so much emotion through his narration and dialogue, and you feel like you’ve known his characters all your life when you hear them speak, but watching them come alive with Jason Muhr’s artwork is astonishing. As much as the writing gets you into the characters, it’s Muhr’s layouts, and the way he composes his pages that elevate this comic into pure brilliance. I’m aware I’m sounding overly hyperbolic here, but Naso and Muhr have created a wonder comic here; Voracious: Feeding Time #3 is like a man who has been eating gas station beef jerky finally gets to eat a fillet mignon.

These are men you need to keep your eyes on.

Out of respect for the creators, joined again by colourist Andrei Tabacaru, I won’t spoil any thing about the issue. But it’s easily the best single issue I have read in a long time, with more nuances and subtle hints than you’d ever expect in a comic book. You often hear people say that something is the culmination of everything that came before it, and that has never been more accurate than with Feeding Time #3; if you’ve read the other issues of Voracious and Voracious: Feeding Time, then you’re going to thoroughly thoroughly enjoy every page of this issue.

It’s only February, and I’m pretty sure this will be the best single issue I’ll read all year; the bar has been set pretty fucking high from here on out. Having said that, if you intend on  reading this comic based entirely on this review without reading any of the previous issues, then you’ll be doing yourself, and the story, a huge disservice. This issue is a complete and utter work of art, and one of the most astonishing comics I’ve read in some time, but without reading at least the first two issues of this series then you’ll think I’m touched if read Feeding Time #3. It’s a phenomenal comic, but it’s not the best jumping on point. There’s not enough of you reading this series, and you’re all missing out.

I have no idea how Markisan Naso and Jason Muhr will top this, but I can’t wait to find out.

Story: Markisan Naso Art: Jason Muhr Colours: Andrei Tabacaru
Story: 11 Art: 10 Overall: 11 (that’s not a typo, this review goes to eleven) Recommendation: Buy

Graphic Policy was provided a FREE copy for review. I’m also buying a print copy when the comic is released because the art looks so much better on the paper than my laptop screen.

Preview: Voracious: Feeding Time #3

VORACIOUS: FEEDING TIME #3

Writer(s): Markisan Naso
Artist Name(s): Jason Muhr
Cover Artist(s): Jason Muhr, Kristen Gudsnuk
32 pgs./ T+ / FC
$3.99 (reg.), $4.99 (var.)

Imprisoned, analyzed and interrogated by the Saurians, Nate is forced to face the monstrous effects his dinosaur hunts have had on the future of another world.

Featuring a “Midnight Special” variant cover by Henchgirl creator Kristen Gudsnuk! Limited to 1,500 copies!

Print

Preview: Doctor Strange/The Punisher: Magic Bullets #3

Doctor Strange/The Punisher: Magic Bullets #3

(W) John Barber (A) Andrea Broccardo, Jason Muhr (CA) Michael Walsh
Rated T+
In Shops: Feb 08, 2017
SRP: $4.99

The strangest team-up in comics continues! A mystically powered mafia group rampages through New York. For Strange and Punisher, it’s time to take to the skies!

doctor_strange_the_punisher__magic_

Preview: Doctor Strange/The Punisher: Magic Bullets #2

Doctor Strange/The Punisher: Magic Bullets #2

(W) John Barber (A) Andrea Broccardo, Jason Muhr (CA) Michael Walsh
Rated T+
In Shops: Jan 11, 2017
SRP: $4.99

Doctor Strange and Punisher are up to their necks in mafia demons! Has the time finally come for Strange to adopt Punisher’s lethal ways? Or is it time for the Punisher to use some magic?

doctor_strange_the_punisher__magic_

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