Tag Archives: infernoct

We Live

Scout Comics’ Wave Two Comic Tags Are Now Available!

The second wave of Scout Comics Comic Tags have been revealed and are now available. The second wave includes Grit, Metalshark Bro: Volume One, Once Our Land: Volume One, Solar Flare: Season Two, Heavenly Blues, The Shepherd: Volume One, Smoketown, and Infernoct.

Scout has hinted more publishers are coming on board in the future.

Comic Tags is a way to both distribute and collect digital comic books that addresses some of the biggest problems that comic publishers and comic collectors face. Comic Tags are a hybrid of comic books and trading cards.

These limited edition collectible cards each have a unique scratch off code to download a PDF copy of the graphic novel featured on the card. They’re attached to hangable backers that open, close, and look like a mini-comic book. These backers have interiors that are pulled right from the comic, giving you a glimpse at what you’re getting and a fun art piece to hang on to along with the collectible card.

Comic Tags have a price point lower than buying typical print and digital trade paperbacks. Most graphic novels are priced between $14.99 and $29.99 each.

Like the first wave release, the second wave of Comic Tags are launching at a retail price of only $6.99 each. For collectors, it’s a fraction of the trade paperback price. For publishers, it’s a whole new product line and profitable way to sell their digital books.

10 Spooky Comics for this Halloween

If you, like the rest of the internet, have been celebrating Halloween since before Labor Day, or have gotten swept up in the pumpkin spice frenzy, or are riding the high of those spooky seasonal vibes, hey. You’re not alone.

Though this year has been widely deemed a dumpster fire, 2017 has provided some excellent seasonal reads for readers who like their comics with a side of horror and mystery. Here are ten comics perfect for setting the Halloween mood.

babyteeth-01-cvrBabyteeth
Donny Cates, Garry Brown, and Mark Englert (AfterShock Comics)

Being a teenager can feel like hell. For pregnant sixteen year old Sadie, it might literally be hell. The first volume explores the strength of familial relationships, navigating the world as a teen mom, and how to deal when a powerful underground group of assassins tries to kill your baby, who is the antichrist.

Goldie Vance
Hope Larson, Jackie Ball, Brittney Williams, Noah Hayes (BOOM! Studios)

Goldie Vance is a teenage detective story appropriate for all ages. Join Goldie as she takes on the mysteries at the Florida resort where she and her dad work. The series is no longer published as single issues and will instead be published in the future in a series of graphic novels, and each arc is an excellent jumping-on point for the series.

Goosebumps_01_CoverA copyGoosebumps: Monsters at Midnight
Jeremy Lambert and Chris Fenoglio (IDW Publishing)

Goosebumps: Monsters at Midnight was released by IDW earlier this month. While it’s definitely geared toward a younger demographic, the first issue is full of references to the original books and stays true to their voice.

HellraiserOmnibus_v1_SC_PRESS_1Hellraiser Omnibus Volume 1
Clive Barker, Tom Garcia, various (BOOM! Studios)

The Hellraiser Omnibus isn’t for the squeamish. The book collects issues 1-20 of Clive Barker’s 2011-2012 Hellraiser series, as well as Hellraiser Annual #1. As part of Hellraiser canon, the comic explores the fate of Kirsty Cotton and the Cenobite realm–and changes them forever.

Infernoct-1InferNoct
Mina Elwell, Eli Powell, and Tristan Elwell (Scout Comics)

The first issue of this Lovecraft-inspired horror comic from Scout Comics was released earlier this month. The story follows Sam, who is trying to save her town (and the people in it) from vicious monster attacks while keeping her grip on sanity.

insexts-3Insexts
Marguerite Bennett, Ariela Kristantina, and Jessica Kholine (AfterShock Comics)

The second collected volume of Insexts will be released in late November, but this comic is well worth reading. The first volume followed Lady Bertram and her lover Mariah as they come to grips with their insect powers and go up against the monsters terrorizing Victorian England. The second volume deals with the aftermath in the same beautiful, erotic, and horrific style as the first volume.

Nancy-Hardy-001-Cov-A-DaltonNancy Drew and the Hardy Boys: The Big Lie
Anthony Del Col, Werther Dell’Edera (Dynamite Entertainment)

Fans of the original series or previous Drew-Hardy team-ups will likely appreciate this series, which brings the gang back together to figure out who killed Fenton Hardy. This is something of a dark departure from the original series (which never featured murder) but is an interesting update appropriate for teens and adults alike.

Monstress01_CoverMonstress
Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda (Image Comics)

Though Monstress is currently on hiatus, this comic remains one of the most visually and narratively interesting comics published this year. The second volume, released in July, develops each character as they process the consequences of the Monstrum living inside main character Maika.

anc_lit-my_favorite_thing_is_monsters-900My Favorite Thing is Monsters
Emil Ferris (Fantagraphics)

My Favorite Thing is Monsters is a gorgeous book with an incredible amount of narrative depth. Though the fact that the main character, Karen Reyes, believes herself a monster makes this read Halloween-appropriate, readers will likely find plenty to relate to in Karen’s interests and search for identity.

My-Pretty-Vampire-coverMy Pretty Vampire
Katie Skelly (Fantagraphics)

Katie Skelly’s My Pretty Vampire combines comics with vintage horror in a gorgeous and compelling color palette. The book follows vampire Clover, who escapes from an oppressive ruled by her brother. Clover’s newfound freedom leads her on a town-wide murder spree, with a shadowy organization not far behind.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors are choosing up to five books and why they’re choosing the books. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Joe

Top Pick: The Mighty Thor #700 (Marvel) – I am optimistic with most things that Jason Aaron touches. He has been killing it on this title, and while some are still arguing if Thor should be a female or not, I have been loving this run. Does Jane die? How does Odinson fit into this? We are into Marvel Legacy territory now, so does that mean he returns as Thor? Or is that too easy? Either way, I can’t wait to find out.

Batman #33 (DC Comics) – Tom King is just getting done with “The Proposal” and “The War of Jokes and Riddles”, and is now joined by Joelle Jones on art to start a new arc. I cannot wait to see what Jones comes up with on art, as I love her style. I also cannot wait to see where King takes us next with the Dark Knight.

Invincible Iron Man #593 (Marvel) – Bendis catches a lot of flack, and sometimes it may be warranted, but I have actually enjoyed what he has been crafting with Riri and Doom. I am pleasantly surprised that this has become one of my most anticipated titles and plots.

Sherlock Frankenstein & The Legion of Evil #1 (Dark Horse) – It’s more of the Black Hammer universe, and Lemire, oh and Rubin. These are two of my favorite creators in the medium, and I can already imagine how their styles will go together, and it excites me.

Kill or Be Killed #13 (Image Comics) – I always look forward to this incredible book. Brubaker is crafting another classic, and I cannot wait to see the ending, but I also never want it to end. That is the dilemma of awesome writing.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Batman: The Drowned #1 (DC Comics) – DC has been knocking it out of the park with Dark Nights: Metal and these one-shots have been introducing us to these nightmarish Batmen. This one is Batman mashed up with Aquaman and the comic itself is one of the best produced yet.

Infernoct #1 (Scout Comics) – A new series from Scout Comics is always worth grabbing and this new one should be on everyone’s buy list. This horror series is one that every fan of H.P. Lovecrraft and horror should check out and it’s perfect for this Halloween season.

Kid Lobotomy #1 (IDW Publishing/Black Crown) – I’m intrigued to see what this new imprint has. I’m expecting Vertigo and we’ll see if this can meet expectations. The series is described as Kafka meets King Lear by way of Young Frankenstein and that alone has me interest.

Normandy Gold #4 (Titan Comics) – I love me some noir and this is a brutal one in a period piece setting. Grim, grimy, gritty, and so good.

The Realm #2 (Image Comics) – This series’ first issue was fantastic, a fantasy Walking Dead and I expect it to find a following like that show. It has the potential to be the next big thing in comics.

 

Shay

Top Pick: Suicide Squad Rebirth Vol. 1 (DC Comics) – All of the awesome in one collected issue. The Squad doesn’t kneel before Zod and it’s amazing!

Top Pick: Black Panther Prelude #1 (Marvel) – The becoming of Black Panther is highlighted in part one of this two part story.

Batwoman #8 (DC Comics) – The “Fear and Loathing” arc continues and the 2nd installment ramps things up to 11.

Harley Quinn #30 (DC Comics) – Who doesn’t want to VOTE HARLEY!

Deadpool vs Old Man Logan #1 (Marvel) – Bring popcorn, it’s about to get real… bloody!

Mina Elwell talks InferNoct, Scout Comics

infernoctEarlier this year, publisher Scout Comics announced an impressive slate of new comics to be released throughout 2017. I talked to Mina Elwell, Media Director at Scout Comics and writer of InferNoct, an upcoming horror comic from Scout.

Graphic Policy: First, thank you for taking the time to talk to us! Could you please tell us a little about yourself?

Mina Elwell: Thank you! I think of myself as a research-based writer. I love hearing about bizarre things –history, mythology, biology, muttering on the subway. (InferNoct is mostly the last one.) Talking to me could go off in any direction.

GP: You’re writing InferNoct, which has been described as a “Lovecraftian” horror story. What can readers expect from this comic?

ME: There’s a kind of looming existential dread associated with Lovecraftian horror, going back to HP Lovecraft’s stories, that I wanted to capture with InferNoct. As horror fans, we’re a little desensitized to extreme gore. A lot of us grew up watching American slashers – we’re hard to shock. What makes Lovecraftian stories disturbing is the sense that we do not really understand each other, nothing we do really matters, and our sanity is fragile.

And tentacles. There will be tentacles.

GP: As a filmmaker, what is it like to switch between writing for film and writing for comics? Are there things that each allows you to do as a writer that you can’t do with the other?

ME: One of the things I really like about comics is how small our team is. Eli Powell and I are co-creators. Tristan Elwell is our color artist, Marshall Dillon is our letterer, and James Pruett is our editor. That’s it. I’m able to write for them and to them, with their specific styles in mind. My scripts have notes and suggestions for Eli, links to hats and sea creatures he might like to draw.

A film script, even for an indie film, is going to be seen by a lot more people. You’re writing for the lighting techs, and the PA’s, not just the director and the editor.

GP: How do these different genres and mediums allow you to explore different kinds of storytelling?

ME: Films (and TV of course) allow a wide variety of people to come together to create the same thing – it’s music, it’s cinematography, it’s costumes and props and makeup, it’s editing, it’s writing. It feels like you’re watching one vision, but you’re really watching the work of hundreds of people working for months.

Eli and I have always been on the same page. What you’re seeing is pretty close to what I first imagined.

GP: What were some of InferNoct’s influences? What drew you to the horror genre?

ME: Other than Lovecraft…

When I was creating the world of InferNoct, I thought a lot about the original 1973 Wickerman, and the way that our perceptions of the townspeople switch several times throughout. InferNoct is an American love letter to folk horror.

With Sam, the protagonist, thought about The Crying of Lot 49, my favorite Pynchon novel. She’s a very different kind of person than Oedipa, but they’re both trying to reinvent themselves, and struggling to face a new reality… or what reality means, depending on how you read it.

I really looked at Thomas Ligotti’s stories when I was thinking about fear. Nobody does fear better than Ligotti.

GP: Based on the description, InferNoct has a really intriguing and unique concept. It’s also not your first horror story. Do you find yourself trying to break or avoid horror tropes when conceptualizing new stories?

ME: In general, I try not to worry about it too much. If two people started out with the exact same concept, they’d probably end up with entirely different final projects. At the same time, most people are pretty familiar with the horror movie archetypes (thank you Scary Movie and Scream Queens) so there’s a danger that anything set in a cabin in the woods with several promiscuous teens will become a parody pretty quickly. Eli and I made the decision to take out a “Hello?” shouted into an empty house the other day… everyone knows that’s how you get killed.

GP: Though the comic isn’t out yet, you’ve been releasing Trauma Cleanup Reports on InferNoct’s Facebook page. This is a pretty awesome way to market the book, set the tone for the story, and show off Eli Powell’s art. How did idea for the trauma reports come about?

ME: I wrote the first Trauma Report as something to hand out at conventions – my first one was Flame Con. I was hoping it would be something to give people a taste of what the series would be like, through the eyes of a different protagonist. Once I started to actually meet people at the cons, and they were excited about the series, I realized I wanted to have something running until release that would help them remember us.

GP: Eli Powell’s art looks absolutely incredible in the previews I’ve seen. What does he bring to the story?

ME: Eli brings a lot of depth to the characters, especially Sam, who is the main character but doesn’t have a ton of dialogue. I think my favorite thing about Eli’s work on InferNoct though is that every time I look at it I find something new. He brings something so funny and twisted to it. I feel like I’m playing Where’s Waldo, except “Waldo” is the name of something slightly sticky with too many teeth.

GP: I was reading an article the other day that suggested humor is a necessary counterpoint to fear because it makes the fear more conquerable. For you, what role does humor play in InferNoct?

ME: Humor is a great way of dealing with fear. It’s probably the best way of exposing things for what they really are — though given our current political situation, it’s pretty clear that we can laugh at something and find it terrifying at the same time…

The humor in InferNoct is pretty dark. There are definitely a few “it’s funny because it’s so awful” moments. We meet a fairly absurd cast of characters who have some terrible things happen to them. Eli’s art is wonderful in that respect as well. In issue 1 I described our character Joey as distracted, and Eli did the most hilarious zoned out expression for him. Keep an eye out for that one…

GP: You’re also Scout Comics’ Media Director. As readers and comic fans, we get to see the final product rather than the behind-the-scenes. What are some of your responsibilities as Media Director? Is there anything that would surprise readers about your job?

ME: There are some really cool new series coming out of Scout at the moment, but since they’re brand new characters, you don’t necessarily know what to expect. I want to make sure it’s getting to the audience that’s going to fall in love with it. Michael Sanchez, our editorial director, is a real master of that as well.

GP: Last year, Scout announced an impressive slate of new comics. What Scout books are you looking forward to in 2017?

ME: There are so many good Scout books coming out this year. I’m really excited about Smoketown, which is coming out right now. Mindbender, written by our wonderful editor James Pruett, is available for preorder this month. If you’ve ever seen InferNoct at a convention, we’re often tabling with AC Medina, whose series Welcome to Paradise really developed alongside InferNoct. I’m looking forward to experiencing it as a reader.

GP: What are your favorite comics/comic-related movies or games?

ME: I grew up on Sandman. Is it surprising that I love horror and dark fantasy? For games, I’m all about Telltale right now. I love that style of episodic storytelling.

GP: I played through Telltale Batman about a month ago and am so ready for Season Two! I love comics because I find the episodic, interrupted narrative immerses you in the story and yanks you right back out. It’s really effective in building suspense between issues, and I was surprised how well that translated to video games.

ME: Absolutely, I think immersing the player in the world is something that Telltale does really well. They do a wonderful job expanding on existing universes. Wolf Among Us had some fantastic original characters that fleshed it out and made it feel real. Obviously, I love a strange cast in a strange world!

GP: Is there anything you’d like to discuss that I didn’t ask you?

ME: Most commonly asked question: Yes! The colorist Tristan Elwell is my father. I’ve been watching him make incredible pictures my whole life; it’s pretty exciting to have him working on something with me. Maybe someday I’ll be able to actually get him to come to a con.

GP: Having grown up with comics like Sandman and an artist/illustrator father, did you always know you wanted to enter the comics field in some capacity?

ME: I’d be happy to be telling stories in literally any medium you can think of, but I’m thrilled to be working on a comic with my dad, who introduced me to comics as a little kid. Does it get better than that?

GP: Thanks again!

Scout Comics Announces Four New Series at New York Comic Con

Kicking off Saturday at New York Comic Con, Scout Comics announced four brand new series coming to shelves in 2017.

WELCOME TO PARADISE

Written by A.C. Medina
Illustrated by Morgan Sawyer
Colored by Ross A. Campbell
Lettered by Micah Myers

Filled with deadly drag races for sport, routine mass killings called “the cleanings”, and where the common house is the size of a closet. Meet Manny, a fun loving, chop shop delivery boy, on the run and in possession of what may be humanity’s last hope. The only problem is Manny’s world is a bunker the size of California and just about everyone in it wants him dead.

welcome-to-paradise

INFERNOCT

Written by Mina Elwell
Illustrated by Eli Powell
Colored by Tristan Elwell
Lettered by Rob Jones

As Sam attempts to discover the real reason the people of her town are being destroyed, she becomes aware of mind-redning creatures that feed off the sanity of their victims. It’s up to her to do something about it… if she can only keep her grip on reality.

infernoct

LITTLE GUARDIANS

Written by Ed Cho
Illustrated by Lee Cherolis

Little Guardians tells the story of two young people switched at birth and now unknowingly living each other’s lives. Subira was supposed to be the next Guardian of Yowza Village, but she was born a girl. Instead she lives a quiet life working at The Item Shop never knowing what should have been. Idem trains to be the next Guardian and tries his best to be the warrior he was never meant to be. How will the next generation survive the choices made for them as strange incidents start plaguing the village and demon attacks appear to be on the rise?

little-guardians

MINDBENDER

Written by James Pruett
Illustrated by Federico De Luca

Alex was only 7 when he first awakened the power that left him comatose for nearly 16 years, an evolutionary power lying dormant in all mankind, bubbling within the unconscious mind waiting and yearning to be unleashed. Finally, a young child was able to touch this untapped force and the results were catastrophic. Those that would use his ability have been awaiting Alex’s awakening. Now, that wait has ended, and the world will soon learn the true potential of mankind. But will Alex be a vanguard for the world or will he be responsible for its annihilation?

mindbender

Zeismic