Tag Archives: image

Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ Criminal comes to Image! #9

Image Comics’ 12-issue, 30th anniversary anthology will drop another highly collectible installment this December in the upcoming Image! #9. Just in time to curl up and read by light of yule log, Image! #9 will feature a brand new Criminal story from crime noir masterminds Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips titled “Teeg’s Christmas Carol,” the highly anticipated return of Gerry Duggan and John McCrea’s beloved Dead Eyes, as well as many more exciting tales.

Cover art for this issue is by Phillips and will display a cigarette puffing, Santa-hat wearing Teeg.

Image! #9 also includes an all-new short by Bitter Root co-creator Chuck Brown and artist Steven Statz, “Familiar Fears,” as well as the latest chapters of “The Blizzard” by Geoff Johns and Andrea Mutti, “Closer” by Kieron Gillen and Steve Lieber, “Red Stitches” by Brenden Fletcher and Erica Henderson, “Gehenna” by Patrick Kindlon and Maurizio Rosenzweig, “Hack/Slash vs. Image” by Tim Seeley and Stefano Caselli, “Billy Dogma” by Dean Haspiel, and “Stupid Fresh Mess” by Skottie Young.

The Image! anthology is a 12-issue series celebrating the 30th anniversary of Image Comics. It treats readers to all-new stories from some of the biggest and best names in comics and is curated by Image Comics’ Publisher Eric Stephenson. The series features a combination of ongoing serials, standalone short stories, and first looks at exciting upcoming projects at Image.

Image! #9 (Diamond Code OCT220159) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, December 28.

Image! #9

James Tynion IV and Fernando Blanco’s W0rldtr33 will debut in Image! #8 this November

The upcoming issue #8 of the Image! anthology series will provide readers with the debut of an all new series set to launch from Image Comics in Spring 2023. The W0rldtr33 story will kick off the forthcoming ongoing series of the same name.

W0rldtr33 is set to be the next major horror offering from multiple Eisner Award-winning writer James Tynion IV and his Razorblades collaborator Fernando Blanco, along with Eisner Award-winning colorist Jordie Bellaire and Eisner Award-nominated letterer Aditya Bidikar.

This early tease of what’s to come for the series drops readers straight into the action with high-stakes to cultivate an immediate sense of unease.

In 1999, Gabriel, Amanda, Liam, Yoshi, and Darren discovered what they dubbed the Undernet—a secret architecture beneath the internet. They charted their exploration of the Undernet on a private message board called W0rldtr33. Then they lost control. And unleashed unimaginable horrors.

The Image! anthology is a 12 issue series celebrating the 30th anniversary of Image Comics. It treats readers to all-new stories from some of the biggest and best names in comics and is edited by Image Comics’ Publisher Eric Stephenson. The series features a combination of ongoing serials, standalone short stories, and first looks at exciting upcoming new projects at Image.

Image! #8 (Diamond Code SEP220273) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, November 23. W0rldtr33 #1 will hit shelves in Spring 2023.

Underrated: Lake Of Fire

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Lake Of Fire


It is 1220 AD, and the gears of the Albigensian Crusade grind on. When an alien spacecraft infested with a horde of bloodthirsty predators crash-lands in the remote wilderness of the French Pyrenees, a small band of crusaders and a Cathar heretic are all that stand between God’s Kingdom and Hell on Earth.

When the owner of my LCS not so subtly recommended this to me by putting it in my pull box, I figured that she’s never steered me wrong yet, so why not give it a go? A few hours ago I opened the cover to the five issue collection, unsure of what I’d be getting beyond the notion that it was essentially aliens verses knights, and I didn’t stop reading until the story was done.

I devoured the entire tpb in one sitting and immediately wondered why I hadn’t read about this somewhere before. Why had nobody told me about this before the owner of my LCS told me to read it?

Published by Image, Lake Of Fire was written, coloured and lettered by Nathan Fairbairn with art by Matt Smith (no, not the guy who played Doctor Who), the comic does have a fairly straight forward knights verses aliens feel to it – not that that is a bad thing as it allows the characters, action and art to really pop.

Yes, there are the fairly standard typical characters within the story, but while Fairbairn does tread familiar ground with the characters, the major players all feel as though they have a weight about them. You have the grizzled old warrior, the naive young knights and the dark priest all present and accounted for, and yes they are popular fantasy archetypes, but they’re well written archetypes which goes a long way in my book. I’d rather a well written archetype than a shallow character for the sake of originality.

That being said, rather than having the characters face off against a supernatural threat Fairbairn instead pits them against a horde of alien predators. I’ve always been partial to seeing how our ancestors would fair against an extraterrestrial threat, and the collected edition of Lake Of Fire scratches that itch remarkably well.

Matt Smith‘s art couldn’t be better suited to the past-meets-future story; the action sequences are easy to follow and once the comic reaches the midpoint the atmospheric art really amps up the threatening feel of the story itself in a case where Fairbairn’s colouring melds so well with Smith’s line art that it’s hard to believe that two people were involved in creating the visuals for the story.

It may seem as if I’m being a little harsh on the story for being relatively straight forward, and that’s not my intent. Lake Of Fire is a fairly easy tale to follow from start to finish, but there are a more layers to the characters than you’d initially expect from the story – such as the relationships between some of the characters – and there’s an underlying theme about acceptance and tolerance in a time when neither of these were encouraged or widely practiced.

As far as recommendations from my LCS go, this is one of the more surprising ones; I didn’t expect much more out of this story than to be able to just pop my feet up with a cup of tea and just relax with a half the story before moving on to something else. Instead I ended up finishing the entire trade in one go and immediately start writing this column. Lake Of Fire is a really enjoyable story that surpasses a lot of the comics currently on the racks – and it’s also entirely self contained.

There are a lot of reasons why I wanted to spotlight the comic this week, but chief among them is that I haven’t heard anything about it anywhere – and that’s why it’s Underrated.


That’s all for this week folks. Join us next week when we talk about something else that falls under the Underrated banner in the comic book world.

Underrated: Descender Volume One: Tin Stars

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Descender Volume One: Tin Stars


I picked up the first volume of Descender the other day because of a recommendation from the owner, and seeing as how she’s never really steered me wrong before and that it was written by Jeff Lemire I figured I’d give it a try. So what’s the series about?

The synopsis reads;

“Young Robot boy TIM-21 and his companions struggle to stay alive in a universe where all androids have been outlawed and bounty hunters lurk on every planet. Written by award-winning creator, Jeff Lemire, Descender is a rip-roaring and heart-felt cosmic odyssey. Lemire pits humanity against machine, and world against world, to create a sprawling epic. Created by Jeff Lemire (Sweet Tooth, Trillium) and Dustin Nguyen’s (Little Gotham) critically acclaimed, bestselling new science fiction series!”

DESCENDER_1_Letts_17.0.jpg

I won’t lie to you, friends, if it hadn’t been my my LCS’ recommendation I would never have read the first volume in this series – and that would have been quite a shame. Y’see even though I frequently say  that science fiction stories aren’t usually my cup of tea, the  more I seem to read the more I seem to enjoy, so either I’m lying or I never really read any good science fiction before form that opinion – either way that’s not the point right now.

Upon opening the first six issue volume of Descender – which you can find for $10 at your LCS – you’ll find an art style that won’t appeal to everyone right away (if you’ve read Little Gotham you’ll know what I mean), but allow yourself a couple of pages and you’ll begin to notice that the art style works incredibly well with the story. Indeed the art and the story mirror each other in that just as you notice that there’s a lot more to Dustin Nguyen‘s art than you’ll initially pick up on in those first few pages, you’ll also begin to realize that Lemire’s plot goes a lot deeper than you’d first expect.

Like all good fantasy and science fiction stories, Descender  (or at least the first volume) will have you thinking about the world around you, and how you react to it, without explicitly telling you what Lemire was thinking about when he was writing the series, lending the work a timeless quality.

Honestly, I’m shocked that I don’t hear more people talking about this series; I’d say it’s one of the best things that Jeff Lemire has written but when the man is as prolific as he is with top notch comics, you’ll forgive me for not giving in to full blown hyperbole. What the first volume  of Descender is, however, is simply fantastic.

 


That’s all for this week folks. Join us next week when we talk about something else that falls under the Underrated banner in the comic book world.

Review: Stray Dogs: Dog Days #2

Stray Dogs: Dog Days #2

Stray Dogs has been an emotional read since the very first issue. It’s fitting that it ends on equal terms, with an emphasis on moving beyond trauma to find some kind of closure. The individual dog stories in “Dog Days” (the two-issue follow-up to the main series) achieves this while also combining for a sensible conclusion that lays every emotion imaginable out in the open with an invitation to feel each one.

Dog Days #2, which continues in the same short story format of the first entry, centers on several of the main story’s dogs to get at their origin stories and how they related to their human companions, the ones taken by their serial killer master. Creators Tony Fleecs and Trish Forstner change it up with stories about victims that initially get away from the main story’s serial killer thanks to their protective dogs and stories focused on memorial services for those who were unfortunate enough to cross paths with the killer.

This issue plays out like an emotional reckoning that brings in the ugliness of the story to the forefront with the intention of accentuating the ripple effects of evil actions and how they all stem from the egotistical desires of twisted individual. What’s impressive is how each segment in the book wrestles with those ideas.

Fleecs and Forstner allow each dog to represent themes such as confusion, anger, acceptance, and mourning during their stories to make sure the overarching narrative closes with an understanding that violence leads to messy endings and that navigating them is never meant to be an easy or clearly defined process.

Stray Dogs: Dog Days #2
Stray Dogs: Dog Days #2, variant cover by Manu Silva

As has been the case with the entire series, the art style continues to be an exercise in contrasts where the dark subject matter collides with Disney-like cartoon visuals to produce a harder-hitting storytelling experience. The same strategy that’s worked before is still intact and continues to work just as well. Forstner has shown complete mastery of the cartoon style and has done a remarkable job adapting it to a type of story that is not usually associated with it.

Fleecs’ script also stays true to form, unafraid to venture into heart-breaking territory without beating you over the head with it. Dog Days #1 already tugged on the heart strings enough, so it was refreshing to see Fleecs take a step back to explore other possibilities, as was the case of one the dog’s successful attempt at scaring the killer away during a kidnapping attempt. It helps to develop the dogs beyond just being victims of the killer’s design and it puts the animal characters under a different light.

Fleecs and Forstner make a formidable creative team and I hope to see more of their work together. Stray Dogs is so good I wish there was a way to extend our stay in its world. There might be a chance of it if they try for an American Horror Story kind of anthology format in which a different horror scenario plays out with different animals and settings. It might open the door for a Stray Cats series in the future, hopefully. For now, though, we have Stray Dogs, and I’ll be rereading it several times more before I’m done with it. You should too.

Story: Tony Fleecs Art: Trish Forstner Colors: Brad Simpson
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10
Recommendation: Buy, read, reread, and then adopt a dog. They can scare away serial killers.

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Image Celebrates 30 years with an Image! Anthology

Celebrate the 30th anniversary of Image Comics with the upcoming anthology series Image! kicking off in April. This 12-issue series will treat readers to all-new stories from some of the biggest and best names in comics.

Edited by Image Comics’ Publisher Eric Stephenson and featuring a combination of ongoing serials and standalone short stories, Image! will be the cannot-miss event of the year.

This first issue will showcase a combination of ongoing serials and standalone short stories, including the first chapters of two 12-part stories, “The Blizzard” by Geoff Johns and Andrea Mutti, as well as the opening installments of a trio of three-parters: “Gospel for a New Century” by Wyatt Kennedy and Luana Vecchio, “Hopeless” by Mirka Andolfo, and “Shift” by Kyle Higgins and Daniele Di Nicuolo. Readers will also be treated to an exclusive first look at Declan Shalvey’s upcoming Old Dog series, an original ongoing comic strip by Skottie Young, and more.

The series will also boast the talents of such comics powerhouses as, Brenden FletcherW. Maxwell PrinceMartín MorazzoRobert KirkmanCory Walker, Ed BrubakerSean PhillipsTim Seeley, Bryan Lee O’Malley, Leslie HungJoe CaseyNathan FoxZoe ThorogoodMaria Lovett, Jay FaerberMatt FractionFábio MoonGabriel BáKelly Sue DeConnickEmma RíosJames Tynion IVKieron Gillen, and many more.

Image! #1 (Diamond Code FEB220047) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, April 13.

Image! #1

Underrated: A.D. After Death

Time got away from me this week, so we’re rerunning an older column from yesteryear.

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: A.D. After Death


I found the hard cover trade of A.D. After Death used for a penny shy of $10 Canadian dollars a month or ago along with a couple other hard cover books that were being sold for a surprisingly good price (which I’m sure will show up in this column eventually). After finally getting a chance to read and finish the book, it wound up as the subject of today’s column.

If you want to read the series’ synopsis, it’s below. If you don’t… well, skip the next paragraph, I guess. Either way, you’ll find the core premise of the comic below.

What if we found a cure for death? Two of comics’ most acclaimed creators, Scott Snyder (Wytches, Batman, American Vampire) and Jeff Lemire (Descender, Plutona, Moon Knight, Sweet Tooth) unite to create an epic like no other, set in a future where a genetic cure for death has been found. Years after the discovery, one man starts to question everything, leading him on a mind-bending journey that will bring him face-to-face with his past and his own mortality.
A unique combination of comics, prose, and illustration, A.D. After Death is an oversized hardcover graphic novel written by Snyder and fully painted by Lemire.

What struck me most after A.D. After Death was that it’s more than a typical comic or graphic novel. While the hardcover I have collects the three oversized issues, the story itself is presented with a lot of Scott Snyder’s prose text set against Jeff Lemire’s haunting artwork in conjunction with more traditional comic panels. The book is really interestingly laid out because of this, and presents a fascinating visual journey from start to finish. It’s a hauntingly beautiful book, with a story that’s equally as haunting.

A.D. After Death isn’t the kind of story I’m used to reading from Scott Snyder, honestly, and I was surprised at how much I enjoyed the ambiguity of the story; told in both the present day and with flashbacks (via the prose text), you’re never quite sure what direction the story will take. I loved the ending, too, but won’t say why because it will reveal a touch too much.

What I will say, is that this may be a book that I won’t read again for some time, but the story itself will stay with me for a long time to come. In a story that can be so much to so many, we’re left asking ourselves who we really are; are you really the person you think you are, or are you just a product of what this world has made you?


Join us next week where there will doubtless be another movie, series, comic or comic related thing discussed that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

Underrated: Time Before Time Volume One

Time got away from me this week, so we’re rerunning an older column from yesteryear.

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Time Before Time vol. 1.


Time Before TIme

Ever since I first watched Marty McFly try and find his way through the 50’s in Back To The Future, I’ve always enjoyed a good time travel story. There’s something about being able to witness history first hand that has always intrigued me, and I get oddly excited when thinking about the details and implications of how the time travelling actually works in different stories. For example can you change the past, or have your actions already happened eve though you haven’t done anything yet?

Is time a river where you can hop out and in at different points but you are still in the same river and it’s course doesn’t divert regardless of what you do, or does each action that you take that differs from what should have happened create something new?

Time Before Time aligns closer to the former example in the above paragraph. In the year 2140, the criminal gang the Syndicate will smuggle you back in time from a world with very little prospects or future to a time with a better tomorrow (albeit with no Wi-Fi). Tatsuo, one of the Syndicate’s time smugglers has had enough of the grind (and radiation exposure) of constant time jumps.

It’s about this moment when he’s caught up with an FBI agent who throws a bit of a wrench into his escape plan, which obviously works out well for the reader.

The comic wasn’t on my radar at all until I was filing back issues away at my LCS and something about the cover caught my eye. I’d love to say I picked it up and read it at home, but instead I stopped what I was doing and read it there and then, and upon finishing picked up the remaining five issues for cover price. There is a trade also available for those same issues, and while the story doesn’t end with the first volume, I’m writing about it today because it was really enjoyable. Time Before Time is one of those stories that I didn’t expect to find – I’m not going to say I didn’t expect to enjoy it, because I’d heard nothing about the book until I actually read the comic. Maybe my head was in the clouds with this one, but I don’t remember putting it in many pull boxes during the initial run of the individual comics earlier in the year, either. So assuming my shop is typical (which it very well may not be), I figured there’s a chance that the book has been slept on by a fair few people.

Do yourselves a favour, and check it out.


Join us next week where there will doubtless be another movie, series, comic or comic related thing discussed that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 11/27/2021

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Echolands #4 (Image)– Hope and her band of adventurers are on the run from the wizard’s daughter and the double-dealing, Kirby homaging Romlus IV in JH Williams, Haden Blackman, and Dave Stewart’s Echolands #4. Williams uses insane washes to show the protagonists struggling to find an exit of the trap with Stewart layering ink black darkness on the line art. Blackman and JH Williams’ plotting and writing is also praise-worthy as they use the device of a meal laid out in a double page spread to flesh out Echolands’ ensemble cast that also functions as a breather and ties into some of the backmatter of previous issues. Echolands continues to be the best-looking ongoing comic with its fusion of art styles and genres all woven together into a narrative of adventure, political intrigue, and something perhaps a bit more cosmic and philosophical. It’s worth reading for Williams’ mastery of the spread alone. Overall: 8.8 Verdict: Buy

Grrl Scouts: Stone Ghost #1 (Image)– Grrl Scouts is back with a new lead character, Dio, and a crazy supporting cast like bounty hunter Turtleneck Jones, the shifty Geordi, and a whole lot of folks who wanna fuck shit up. Most importantly, Jim Mahfood’s free-flowing, street art tinged art style is in full effect and a perfect fit for the lawlessness of space some time in the future. Grrl Scouts: Stone Ghost #1 isn’t bogged down by explanations or exposition, but just in being a good and sad time. I love how Mahfood uses black and white notebook style pages and a loose art style to talk about Dio’s experiences with her dead boyfriend, and how much she misses him. Grrl Scouts: Stone Ghost is a cool looking, fast moving comic that also packs an emotional punch and has an air of mystery. Jim Mahfood is a true treasure, and you shouldn’t definitely check out his sweet storytelling. I mean, the cartoonist makes the rhythm of buying and downing a beer and a shot compelling. Overall: 9.2 Verdict: Buy

Amazing Spider-Man #79 (Marvel)– Cody Ziglar, Michael Dowling, and Jesus Aburtov lean into the corporate satire (Of the Beyond Corporation) in Amazing Spider-Man #79 while also telling an action-packed, poignant Spidey tale. Joking to mask the pain is definitely a recurring thread in this one beginning with a laugh out loud opening sequence of a Beyond Corporation pencil pusher disappearing while singing a drunken rendition of “What A Fool Believes”. Although it’s hard to tell the Beyond folks apart (And maybe that’s the point), Dowling’s clean art style makes Spider-Man’s fight scenes look smooth while adding a little chaos to the mix once this issue’s bad guy shows up. Because deep down, this is a story where Spider-Man literally and metaphorically gets his ass kicked with Michael Dowling and Aburtov bringing the pain while Ziglar’s anxious narration highlights every missed dodge, block, and opening. I hadn’t read many Ben Reilly stories before this run, but Cody Ziglar and Dowling do a great job of making me interested in a guy, who has the dual struggles of pleasing corporate masters and stepping into the legacy of one of the greatest heroes of all time. Plus the usual fisticuffs, scum, and villainy. Overall: 8.1 Verdict: Buy

Wolverine #18 (Marvel)– Wolverine #18 is an action movie in single comic form with heart and humor from Benjamin Percy, Paco Diaz, and Java Tartaglia. Percy threads in some of the most successful elements of his run, like supporting characters Jeff Bannister and Maverick, to give this story some stakes. Wolverine can really be himself and have a good time around Bannister and his daughter so threatening is a sure fire recipe for suspense. Diaz uses wide, inter-cutting panels to intensify the big truck/Krakoan chase sequencek and also shows that Maverick is better as a profit-driven anti-hero instead of an ally. Throw in some funny data pages and Johnny Cash karaoke, and this is an enjoyable installment of Wolverine even though Adam Kubert’s art is sorely missed. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

Black’s Myth #5 (Ahoy)– Eric Palicki and Wendell Cavalcanti wrap up this werewolf PI mystery in a neat bow placing previous scenes in the series in a new context. I love the character growth for Strummer and Ben too as he runs point on a case, and she finds a little romance. Black’s Myth #5 definitely had me wishing there were more cases in store for this LA Noire meets Fables duo. Overall: 7.7 Verdict: Read

Brett

Task Force Z #2 (DC Comics) – The first issue debuted the crazy concept of Batman rogues returned from the dead after A-Day to join a team led by Red Hood. It was so out there and worked so well. The second issue delivers more of the same with a greater focus on what’s going on. When I heard the pitch, I rolled my eyes. But, some great character interaction, action, and solid art, it’s a comic I’m excited to see how far it goes. Overall Rating: 8.35 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Underrated: Starlight

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Starlight.


Conceived by Hollywood darling Mark Millar (with art by Goran Parlov), Starlight was a six issue miniseries that was released beginning in March of 2014 and ending in October 2014. Telling the story of the superbly named Duke McQueen, an Air Force pilot who went to space and saved the alien planet of Tantalus from tyranny forty years ago, before returning home and raising a family instead of staying to rule the planet. His exploits, sadly, were written off as the ravings of a attention seeker, and Duke became a joke to all but his sweetheart.

Now, with his wife dead, his family not giving him the time of day, and people still treating him as a joke, a spaceship arrives to take the old man on one last grand adventure to save the planet Tantalus once again.

One of the less Mark Millar-y comics that have come from his keyboard in the last half decade, this mini series had none of the hyper violence seen in things such as Kick-Ass, Wanted and Kingsman. Surprisingly Starlight is a sentimental yarn about a former hero redeeming himself in his own eyes and saving the planet from a tyrannical despot once again.

Starlight is a pleasure to read. Although criticism can be levelled at the sudden change as Duke McQueen goes from couch-bound crank to crack aimed space hero over the course of only a couple of issues, for me that misses the spirit of the book. Think not of Starlight in terms of the modern, more realism based stories we’ve become accustomed to, and instead fall back into the nostalgia of the classic stories of yesteryear as Millar embraces the straight forward nature of the story – almost against type, as McQueen battles against an antagonist who doesn’t measure up to the rich and deep characterization of the hero; Kingfisher is a perfectly adequate villain, but make no mistake, Starlight is a redemptive story for Duke McQueen.

Perhaps in seeing McQueen struggle against overwhelming odds, himself, and the reputation he had been given, we can find hope and inspiration in our own lives. Not quite the lesson I expected to take from a Mark Millar book.

I had forgotten how much I loved Starlight until I saw a tweet mentioning the series a few days ago that inspired me to dig the comics out and reread them.  It’s a love that I genuinely believe you’ll share when you give the series a chance – it’s an underrated gem that you wouldn’t typically expect to come from Mark Millar.


Join us next week when we look at something else that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

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