Tag Archives: green lantern: mosaic

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #18

Green Lantern Mosaic #18

Sometimes the fork in the road is the best thing that could happen to us. When we find ourselves at a place where we cannot go forward or stall we then look for a better way. Sometimes that means moving to a new place, hoping it brings good fortune as well. Then there are those times we find a relationship that may be dragging us down, leading one to cut ties with people who are considered emotional vampires.

Those around may know us better than we know ourselves but this isn’t always the case. As you get older, you’ll find that people older than you give you unsolicited advice and sometimes it’s from people who you consider close. This is when your ability to discern comes into play. In the last issue of Green Lantern Mosaic, Jon’s powers have grown more than the rest of the Corps could anticipate as he gets into the battle of his life.

We find Jon shortly after the Amazon Hellburner eviscerated everyone he loves in the Mosaic. He becomes focused and rebuilds the Mosaic by hand, unleashing a new power and role, as he has gained the abilities to join the ranks of the Guardians. He uses his newfound abilities to restore the Mosaic to balance, even getting rid of some evildoers in the process.  By the issue’s end, he finds a way for all inhabitants of the Mosaic to live harmoniously, definitively ending his tenure as Protector of the Mosaic.

Overall, an issue that ends the story as wild and serene as the story has always been. The story by writer Gerard Jones is great and infinite. The art by the creative team is astounding. Altogether, an issue that gives readers a satisfying conclusion.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Luke McDonnell, Steve Mattson,
and Robert Campanella
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #17

Green Lantern Mosaic #17

What happens when it seems as though everything you built, has gone to waste? Have you ever been in a situation where you felt it was a wasted effort? Some people may feel this in romantic relationships, where one person is more serious about the relationship than the other. Others may feel this in their professional career as if their lives stalled if they don’t get to a certain milestone by a certain age.

This is where one finds that purpose or that reason for going forward. This tests your resolve and why you are where you are. All we have is our fortitude and our reason for living. In the 17th issue of Green Lantern Mosaic, Jon’s perfect picture of the Mosaic is crumbling, and he’s doing everything to keep it intact despite the efforts of the aliens and the Green Lantern Corps.

We find Jon reunited with Katma Tui, a brief bright moment as the rest of the Green Lantern Corps looks to dismantle what Jon has built within the Mosaic. Soon each of the Justice Leaguers that came with the Green Lantern Corps finds out just how complex a world Jon created and how arduous it is to manage. Hal’s frustration leads to a boiling point, leading him to seek the direction of the Guardians. By the issue’s end,  one of the races in the Mosaic looks to carry out a genocide that will see every race decimated.

Overall, an issue that puts the complete story in perspective. The story by Gerard Jones is impactful and vast. The art by the creative team is astonishing. Altogether, an issue that shows the reader just how complex a world builder Johns was already, all those years ago.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Luke McDonnell, Steve Mattson,
and Robert Campanella
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #16

Green Lantern Mosaic #16

When should you ask for help?  Everyone is different when they look to ask for the help they require. For some, it’s when they can’t figure something out right away. They want an answer but nothing possessing the knowledge to move forward. Then there are those who have something to prove but would rather drown than ask for help. Both of these situations prove that most don’t know that they are in trouble.

Sometimes, it takes our friends and family to step up and step in. We sometimes can’t see when we need help. It usually is more difficult for superheroes, especially when saving the world is at the center of their actions. In the 16th issue of Green Lantern Mosaic, Jon looks to his super-powered friends to confront the mounting issues in the Mosaic world.

We stumble upon the Mosaic World, as it is under attack, and not from your usual villains, it just so happens to be Hal Jordan and some of the Justice League, looking to make their presence known. As we soon find out just how Jon came to the Mosaic World in the first place, and how his steadfast valiance is what attracted Rose to him in the first place. We also see how the events of Mosaic have become too much for Jon, as Hal and Guy and Gardner return to end all the chaos, but not without causing a bit of trouble themselves. By the issue’s end, as Jon regains his faculties, some things have shifted back, as his dead wife, Katma Tui, is alive and well now.

Overall, one of the best issues ever. The story by Gerard Jones is unassailable and infinite. The art by the creative team is extraordinary. Altogether, an issue that shows how great a storyteller Jones is.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Luke McDonnell, Steve Mattson,
and Robert Campanella
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #15

Green Lantern Mosaic #15

In our world, the taking of human life is incomparable. To commit the act is a crime for a reason. It’s borne of ill will most of the time. Sometimes it’s accidental, and at times involuntarily. Then there are times when the person absolutely has no choice because of circumstance.

When you have no choice it may be as well be a matter of life or death. It’s either you or the other person. Being in the military, I’ve seen this scenario play out too many times where you may have a moment of being utterly frozen or your training kicks in. It’s rare when we have to reckon with these split-second decisions. When we do, it is usually hell to pay. In Green Lantern Mosaic #15, Jon has this very dilemma in front of him, with the guidance of Ch’p.

We find Jon trying to get his bearings, when old Timer shows up, to carry him to his own personal hell known as Xanshi. He literally confronts those he has killed throughout his life. Each person is more difficult to deal with, and he has to even confront his Grandpa Roy. These confrontations cause him to self reflect, making him question why he has sustained the Mosaic world as log ash e has. By issue’s end, his most devastating reckoning just so happens to be his wife, Katma, leaving him, unfettered.

Overall, one of the best issues of the series, leaving fans to see how human Jon is as he deals with past foes. The story by Gerard Jones is commanding and vast. The art by the creative team is remarkable. Altogether, an issue which reinforces why the fanfare fro this book remains almost thirty years later

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Luke McDonnell, Steve Mattson,
and Robert Campanella
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #14

Green Lantern Mosaic #14

There’s not too many movies that induce paranoia like Invasion of the Body Snatchers. It tapped into our worst fears of mind control and total immersion into society. Marvel took the idea and unleashed it into their comic universe through the Skrull Invasion. This, of course, was pushed into their Cinematic Universe in Captain Marvel and Spiderman: Homecoming, showing a world where you need to question if someone really is who they say they are.

The movie’s story infused the idea that our worst fears can be realized at any moment and we would be powerless towards it. The movie has had several remakes and remixes, and every time the story at the center of it is still so relevant. As interesting as the Skrulls are at Marvel, I always wondered how it would be if an actual superhero were mind-controlled. In Green Lantern Mosaic #14, this scary idea plays out.

We find John enjoying the world he built on Mosaic but still feels incomplete. It’s a situation he doesn’t know how to overcome. Before he can settle into his sublime, the UberMenschen, controlled by the Peeper attack the Mosaic and take control of his body through the use of Pods. These very pods start to take control of different inhabitants slowly becoming the dominant force within the Mosaic World.

Overall, a crazy trip of an issue in this series, one which will make the reader re-read to see what a rabbit hole writer Gerard Jones leads us into. The story by Jones is powerful and immense. The art by the creative team is gorgeous. Altogether, a story that will have fans of this book even more enamored.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Luke McDonnell, Steve Mattson,
and Robert Campanella
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #13

Green Lantern Mosaic #13

John Adams was one of those historical figures that was not merely a Founding Father. His significance has been overshadowed by the more popular men who inhabited the seat of President. In fact, his popularity is even eclipsed by two men who did not reach such heights, Sam Adams, and Ben Franklin. That’s why the high character he has shown throughout his life and career, is something everyone should aspire to.

Before he became President, the one story which showed how high his morals were was when he defended British Troops in an American court. He defended these soldiers in one of the most tragic events in the then young nation, one that would shape its very soul, the Boston Massacre. His belief in a fair trial and equal justice for all is what makes him one of America’s true Norths. In the thirteenth issue of Green Lantern: Mosaic, we find Jon in a similar predicament, one that will test his heart.

We find an inhabitant of the Mosaic, marveling at the malaise humans bring to this world, and with their new human inhabitants, the KKK, an unhealthy amount of hate. As the usurper looks to use the KKK to get his way, as he cleverly manipulates the KKK and their insecurities. We find out how they learned to hate in the first place, especially their leader Moses Rockwell, whose hate swelled to the point that he pushes any type of light out of his life. By issue’s end, Rockwell, looking to get to Jon comes after Rose with the help of some Amazons.

Overall, an issue that is probably its most progressive, giving a world view that would not be seen again until American History X. It provokes thought in readers through self-reflection.  The story by Gerard Jones is engrossing. The art by the creative team is intricate and lovely. Altogether, an issue shows a complex world where race is explored both thematically and philosophically.

Story: Gerard Jones Art: Cully Hamner and Danny Panosian
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #12

Green Lantern Mosaic #12

When it comes to one’s morals, sometimes holding the line can be the most difficult thing you can ever do. Life will show you, just like in that movie Training Day, people are either sheep or wolves. People who are sheep tend to be meek, quite ordinary, and will bend towards whatever direction those in power lean. People who are wolves, usually stand their ground and will persevere no matter the consequences.

What happens when your morals and your convictions are at a crossroads? Take for example when people support free speech. What happens when that same argument is used to defend hate speech? Can the argument outlive the situation? In the twelfth issue of Green Lantern: Mosaic, we find Jon defending an unworthy enemy, one which shows what kind of hero he really is.

We find a KKK leader espousing how Jon’s hopes for an interspecies utopia is fruitless furthering the division between the inhabitants of the Mosaic. Jon intercedes as the KKK’s efforts become unfortunately increasingly effective, but also united against these usurpers, who Jon soon realizes he has to defend, despite the hate they spread. As he soon dreams about what would the different Lanterns of the Corps would react. By issue’s end, as Jon looks to intercept another attack by the KKK, the tables turn to Jon’s surprise, ending this issue both ironically and hysterically.

Overall, an issue that shows just how sophisticated and progressive Jones’ writing has come over the course of the book.  The story by Jones is entertaining. The art by the creative team is elaborate and beautiful. Altogether, an issue that tackles a real-life issue but instantly pushes the story even more.

Story: Gerard Jones Art: Cully Hamner and Danny Panosian
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #11

Green Lantern Mosaic #11

As true as it is that your experiences shape who you are, it goes for both good and bad. If you take the pessimist view of experiences, one would consider bad experiences to be the best teacher. While good experiences tend to shelter you from the realities of most situations. Then there’s the one thing we all have regardless of the current station in life, regrets.

We all wished we did something different. If we just went a different direction, how much would that change things? Then there are those people we lost. How we wished we spent more time with them if we knew how much time we had left. If you were in the military, those who paid the ultimate sacrifice, that last time you talked, stays with you. In the tenth issue of Green Lantern: Mosaic, we find Jon reliving missteps in what feels like a nightmare.

We find Jon, as he wakes up from a deep sleep, to his childhood home, and to his father scolding him about getting to school on time. As he gets acclimated  to what is going on, certain memories of that time washes over him,  as he goes to his grandparents place, to remember exactly how his grandfather died, with a knife to the chest, one which he still has in this reality, which indicate to Jon that something is truly off. This is where Ch’p and the Guardians step in, making him realize that this reality is a mind manipulation of a powerful outside force.

Overall, a nice trip down memory lane for Jon which gives readers a better understanding of who Jon, not the Green Lantern, really is. The story by Gerard Jones is enjoyable. The art by the creative team is outstanding. Altogether, an issue that gives readers a behind the scenes look at this sometimes enigmatic character in the Green Lantern Corps.

Story: Gerard Jones Art: Cully Hamner and Danny Panosian
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #10

Green Lantern Mosaic #10

Being the oldest grandchild on both sides of my family comes with some advantages and disadvantages. The advantages are that most of my cousins usually give me more respect than my children some days. The disadvantages are I get to suffer the signs of aging way before they do. One of the few things that I do relish is the gift of memories.

I’m old enough to remember all of my grandparents’ stories including their memories of growing up during World War II. I heard from them the horrors that they endured from the Japanese soldiers that came to the Philippines. As a student of history, I often wondered why it took America so long to enter the war and for what reasons. In the ninth issue of Green Lantern: Mosaic, we find Jon in the middle of a galactic conflict about to erupt in the Mosaic world.

We find Jon, as he holds court with The Guardians, imploring to them the complexity of the challenges he faces on a daily basis. As he finally resolves to break down and give them a tour of the realm, he was assigned by them to protect, where he explains the intricacies and eccentricities of each species living the Mosaic, and how it has led to more cooperation than dissolution. Of course, just as he was making his point a conflict breaks out between two races, which as John always does, diffuses. By the issue’s end, the Guardians succumb to John’s point of view, a door which has opened the door to some possibilities according to some Lanterns looking on.

Overall, an idyllic issue that revels in the Green Lantern mythology while giving readers a front-row seat to why so many of us love this book.  The story by Gerard Jones is entertaining. The art by the creative team is superb. Altogether, an issue that plays on the book’s strengths and further embeds the reader in the genius of the book’s premise.

Story: Gerard Jones Art: Cully Hamner and Danny Panosian
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #9

Green Lantern Mosaic #9

When it comes to holiday specials, comics can be a bit of a minefield. Every child has their perfect holidays special in mind and it mostly involves cartoons. Peanuts were something that many generations including mine enjoyed. Then every Saturday morning cartoon had a special Holiday episode, one of the most memorable ones being He-Man & The Masters Of The Universe.

Comics were even a bit different than what the cartoons gave viewers. I remember seeing comics books with Batman and Robin wearing Santa hats and smiling It was an odd look for the Dark Knight. Also, most of the stories worked around the Scrooge archetype. Though entertaining, readers became wary of this reiteration. In the ninth issue of Green Lantern: Mosaic, we’re taken to the holiday season in Mosaic and just like here on Earth, dealing with different cultures and rituals.

We find Jon, as he reminisces about his family back home on Earth and how during this time of the year, Xmas, how much he misses them. As his time on Mosaic has taught him adaptability is what key to surviving in this world, as he reflects on how being a Black man on Earth has given him empathy on how to deal with the different races of aliens. As finds a way for all the different alien races living on Mosaic to get along for just one night. By issue’s end, John is one of the best Christmases he had in a place where he never imagined himself being.

Overall, a blissful issue that celebrates the reason for the season. The story by Gerard Jones is enjoyable. The art by the creative team is stunning. Altogether, an issue which shows the world that sometimes comics can tell better stories about the holiday season than any other medium.

Story: Gerard Jones Art: Cully Hamner and Danny Panosian
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

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