Tag Archives: green arrow

Preview: Green Arrow #50

Green Arrow #50

(W) Collin Kelly, Jackson Lanzing (A) Javi Fernandez (CA) Kevin Nowlan
In Shops: Mar 06, 2019
SRP: $4.99

Spinning out of the events of JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE and HEROES IN CRISIS! When a black ops organization discovers Green Arrow’s long-held secret-a mysterious weapon in the form of a box, given to him by the Justice League-they’ll deploy their top undercover agent: Black Canary! On opposite sides of this festering secret, Green Arrow and Black Canary will clash as only two lovers can-by aiming straight for the heart! A mystery six months in the making, the box that can destroy the Justice League will be opened…and the Emerald Archer’s world will be forever changed. This extra-sized anniversary issue of Green Arrow’s life isn’t just ending…it’s burning to the ground!

Green Arrow #50

Preview: Green Arrow #49

Green Arrow #49

(W) Collin Kelly, Jackson Lanzing (A) Javi Fernandez (CA) Kevin Nowlan
RATED T+
In Shops: Feb 06, 2019
SRP: $3.99

The city of Seattle has been weaponized against Green Arrow in a mind-bending cataclysm! Trapped inside Count Vertigo’s psychotic maze, Green Arrow, Black Canary and Indigo Riot have no escape-and no way to appease the villain’s impossible demands! The key may come from Oliver Queen’s past-but can Green Arrow face his own grief and emerge unbowed? This issue features a shocking ending that will set the stage for the future of GREEN ARROW!

Preview: Green Arrow #48

Green Arrow #48

(W) Collin Kelly, Jackson Lanzing (A) Javi Fernandez (CA) Kevin Nowlan
In Shops: Jan 09, 2019
SRP: $3.99

Count Vertigo stages a jailbreak and turns Seattle into a surrealist maelstrom that threatens to consume the entire city. But when Ollie learns Vertigo’s true motivations, the Emerald Archer’s fragile psyche will be ripped to shreds. Is Ollie throwing himself into the hero game because of a death wish? Not if Black Canary has anything to sing about it.

Green Arrow #48

Preview: Green Arrow #47

Green Arrow #47

(W) Julie Benson, Shawna Benson (A) German Peralta (CA) Alex Maleev
In Shops: Dec 05, 2018
SRP: $3.99

Oliver Queen is in for the shock of his life-in the electric chair! The vigilante Citizen kidnaps Oliver and subjects him to the court of public opinion on a worldwide broadcast, and a guilty verdict means a death sentence. It’s up to Black Canary and attorney Kate Spencer to rescue Ollie so he can expose Citizen’s true identity and prove his own innocence. And they might even have a chance with a little help from Green Arrow…what the what now?

Around The DC Universe: Titans, Jason Todd, The Longbow Hunters, and More!

Welcome to “Around the DC Universe,” Graphic Policy’s weekly guide to the best comics and shows on DC Entertainment’s premium subscription service.

Original Series

After a week away from this column I had a bit of catching up to do with Titans. The show continues to be one of the best that DC has ever produced, finally bringing the team together in one episode and introducing the second Robin, Jason Todd in another. With the series entering its second half the characters are really starting to gel as a group. It’s a lot of fun to see the chemistry between them at work and watching Dick take on the villainous Nuclear Family as Robin was tremendously satisfying. Jason too is very well done. There aren’t many portrayals of the character to hold up against Curran Walters’ for comparison but he does a good job defining him nonetheless. Walters’ Jason evokes the blend of sympathy and disdain that the character demands with a screen presence that is magnetic. He’s a great addition to the regular ensemble and I hope to see more of him as the series develops.

Comics

One of the earliest series I recommended through this column was Kevin Smith’s run on Green Arrow. This time around I call your attention to another classic story featuring the emerald archer: The Longbow Hunters by writer/artist Mike Grell. From the same era as Miller and Mazzuchelli’s Batman Year One and Tim Truman’s Hawkworld, this three issue mini series reintroduced Oliver Queen to the post-Crisis DC Universe. Grell’s Ollie is a grounded, urban vigilante on the hunt for a serial killer who stalks the streets of Seattle amidst a much larger affair involving rogue intelligence operatives and mysterious assassins. Fans of the TV show Arrow will recognize many familiar elements in the mini series itself and the follow up ongoing series with artist Ed Hannigan, several issues of which are also available on DC Universe in Green Arrow (1987). While the art is gorgeous and the stories compelling in their own right I do think this run is missing something. A notably conservative creator Grell never fully embraces the liberal politics that have been one of  Oliver’s trademarks ever since Denny O’Neill and Neal Adams got their hands on him in the late seventies.  One might expect a critique of the lefist point of view, coming as the series does at the height of the Reagan era, but ideology is mostly ignored to the detriment of the characterization of comics’ proudest liberal. While it does strike slightly right of the bullseye, The Longbow Hunters is still a high water mark in Green Arrow’s career and is worth the attention of anyone who is interested in his adventures.

Technical Issues

The addition and subtraction of new comics remains the biggest problem with the DC Universe service. As I reported several weeks ago, the powers that be seem to be discussing how to improve the comics portion of the site by changing how the library is curated. What this means is still being left vague by the moderators of the community forums but the sense of disaffection among users is palpable. Nothing has been added to the comics library to replace Dark Victory after that title expired on November 12th and there have been no announcements about any forthcoming special features.

While I appreciate DC’s commitment to using subscriber feedback to improve the user experience, by not continuing  to rotate new special feature titles while they discuss a fix they’re giving the impression to anyone who doesn’t follow the community forums that they’ve abandoned comics streaming as a feature. Coming on the heels of the demise of Filmstruck it doesn’t breed confidence in Warner Brothers’ long term commitment to this product or its users. I for one think that there is a lot of untapped potential in DC Universe and would hate to see it fail to live up to it. 

Preview: Green Arrow #46

Green Arrow #46

(W) Julie Benson, Shawna Benson (A) German Peralta (CA) Alex Maleev
In Shops: Nov 07, 2018
SRP: $3.99

Green Arrow finds himself in the crosshairs and caught in a crossfire: on one side, would-be populist vigilante Citizen, who’s out to make the one percent pay. On the other, the citizens of Seattle, who mob Green Arrow wherever he goes. While Black Canary investigates Citizen’s real identity, Oliver’s corporate lawyer and confidant Kate Spencer deals with a free-falling Queen Industries. It’s not a good time to be Oliver Queen OR Green Arrow…until our hero becomes taken with an insane plan to thwart Citizen once and for all.

Around the DC Universe: What to Check Out this Week in Movies, TV, and Comics!

Welcome back to Around the DC Universe Graphic Policy’s regular examination of the best and worst content on DC Entertainment’s premier streaming service.

Special Features

For the next few weeks DC Universe will be expanding their selection of issues from the original run of The New Teen Titans (1980) by Marv Wolfman and George Perez in the lead up to the premier of the Titans TV series (the first episode drops October 12th). DC is being cagey about how long issues will remain on the service so my recommendation is to read them as soon as possible because they are really good. Wolfman’s writing, while somewhat dated, holds up better than any of his contemporaries (with the possible exception of Chris Claremont) and Perez’s art improves with every issue reaching towards the pinnacle of his artistic achievement. It’s one of the best books of its era and a masterclass in the form that today’s creators can still draw upon for inspiration. Of particular note is issue #8 (“A Day in the Life”) a nice character piece that fleshes out the series three original creations (Starfire, Cyborg and Raven) and brings them closer to the characters we’ve come to know and love.

Movies and TV

Last week I warned you away from Superman: Doomsday and now I am happy to report that this year’s The Death of Superman is a much more successful adaptation of the original source material (which is still available to read). I love how the creators tied the escalation of the Lois and Clark romance into the fight between Superman and Doomsday. When Lois tells Clark that she loves him for the first time right before he sacrifices himself to save her and Metropolis I was moved to tears. The buildup to the climactic battle is great and the fight itself is even more epic than the one captured in the comics due to better staging and the fact that they used a much more iconic Justice League to really drive home how much of a threat Doomsday really was. The funeral sequence feels a little protracted but it is a nice coda and serves to really whet the appetite for Reign of the Supermen set to be released next year.

I know I’m a bit late to the party here but with the long awaited third season promised to drop soon I decided that it was past time to catch up on Young Justice. I really enjoy how they handle the broader DC Universe, pulling in odd little deep cuts here and there. They are fun easter eggs if you’re familiar with what’s being referenced but not completely confusing if you don’t.  If I have one criticism it’s that in the early episodes they tend to focus on obscure D-list villains in favor of more potent antagonists but this problem seems to be resolving about half way through the series with appearances by Lex Luthor, Ras Al Ghul and the Joker.  

Comics

Green Arrow is a really difficult character to get right. Thus far the best presentation I’ve seen is The CW’s Arrow  but Kevin Smith’s 2000 comic book run is a close second. In Quiver, Oliver Queen returns from the dead with amnesia. He believes that he’s just back from some hard travel with his friend Green Lantern Hal Jordan but years have passed and the world has changed. Regardless of what you may think of his movies Smith knows how to write comics well: his sense of action is flawless and his dialog pithy and on point. Phil Hester’s art is hit or miss for me but his simple sense of style works well here and is a nice complement to Smith’s wordplay. I can’t unequivocally recommend this book since there is some non-explicit sexual situations involving a young girl that some might find triggering (especially given recent events) and a supporting character who is pretending to be a fairly cringeworthy trope but if these are not deal breakers for you the storytelling is of a quality that it is worth reading. Available on DC Universe in Green Arrow (2000-) #1-10.

If you are looking for something a bit more modern there are several arcs available from Geoff Johns’ 2007 Action Comics run with Superman director Richard Donner. In Escape From Bizarro World (with artist Eric Powell) Superman must save Pa Kent from his imperfect clone and a planet full of his offspring (including a Bizarro Justice League). Braniac (with artist Gary Frank) tells the story of the first true confrontation between Superman and one of his arch foes, the evil alien mastermind from the planet Colu. While Johns’ brand of decompressed storytelling isn’t for everyone, this is a case where it works fairly well. It’s an interesting run as the writers seem to be intent on adding elements of both the pre-Crisis comics continuity and the Christopher Reeve Superman films into the stripped-down framework previously established by John Byrne in his 1987 reboot. These stories actually read better taken outside the context of the character’s broader continuity adrift  as they are adrift between major periods of the Superman canon. The tone of Braniac may also feel familiar to those who are following Mark Andreyko and Kevin Maguire’s current run on Supergirl making for interesting comparisons between the two. Available on DC Universe in Action Comics (1938-) #855-857 and #866-870.

Review: Green Arrow #45

Green Arrow #45 is a Heroes in Crisis tie-in that revolves around the death of *spoiler*. Does it pack an emotional punch and is it a must read? Find out!

Green Arrow #45 is by Julie Benson, Shawna Benson, Javier Fernandez, John Kalisz, and Deron Bennett.

Get your copy in comic shops today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Preview: Green Arrow #45

Green Arrow #45

(W) Julie Benson, Shawna Benson (A) Javi Fernandez (CA) Alex Maleev
In Shops: Oct 03, 2018
SRP: $3.99

In this Heroes in Crisis tie-in, Oliver Queen is forced to take a hard look at himself and evaluate his methods after he fails one too many times trying to do the right thing. It’s a dark, depressing stroll down memory lane for the Emerald Archer, as Oliver must come to grips with how he’s hurt the people around him. This issue guest-stars members of the Justice League and the Titans, but are they there to console Ollie…or condemn him?

Preview: Green Arrow #44

Green Arrow #44

(W) Julie Benson, Shawna Benson (A) Javi Fernandez (CA) Alex Maleev
In Shops: Sep 05, 2018
SRP: $3.99

Green Arrow is used to firing at targets-but he’s not used to having the bull’s-eye on his own back! Social justice vigilante Citizen calls out Oliver Queen as one of his next marks, so now Ollie’s fighting a two-front battle in both his private and crime-fighting lives. Green Arrow must protect the others whom Citizen has named in his scheme to eradicate corruption from Seattle, while simultaneously dodging the attacks aimed at him-luckily, he’s got Black Canary and Kate Spencer watching his back. Unfortunately, they can’t save him from everything…

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