Tag Archives: garry brown

Steve Orlando and Garry Brown team up for Crude

GLAAD Media Award-nominated writer Steve Orlando and acclaimed artist Garry Brown will launch the gritty revenge thriller Crude this April from Image Comics/Skybound Entertainment.

Killers once feared Piotr Petrovich. Now, they’ve sent his son home to him—in a body bag.

Haunted by his failures, Piotr journeys across Russia to learn what type of man his son really was, while hunting the bastards who killed him. And once Piotr finds them, they will learn to fear him once more…

Get ready for an emotional, bone-shattering account of murder, masculinity, and mayhem.

Crude #1 hits comic book stores Wednesday, April 11th. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, March 19th.

Preview: John Carter: The End #5

John Carter: The End #5

writer: Brian Wood, Alex Cox
artist: Hayden Sherman
covers: Garry Brown (a), Juan Doe (b)
incentive cover: Garry Brown (B/W art), Juan Doe (“virgin art”)
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

WORLD WAR MARS! The battle for the fate of Mars kicks off, and from the depths of the planetary core comes a fighting force that has not been seen for a millennium.

Review : Babyteeth #1

Quick — what do you get when you cross Juno with The Omen?

I can’t say I know for sure, but the answer could be the new Aftershock Comics series Babyteeth, the latest from the suddenly-quite-busy Donny Cates, cooked up in collaboration with Black Road artist/co-creator Garry Brown, which seems right off the bat to be a mash-up of those two popular films, but who knows? It could prove to be something else entirely as events proceed.

Here’s the run-down : 16-year-old Sadie of Salt Lake City, Utah, is more than just a nerdy social outcast comic book fan — she’s also pregnant. The old man — whoever he may be — isn’t around. She’s managed to keep her condition a secret from everyone barring her dope-dealing sister, Heather, but when her first contraction register a 5.0 on the fucking Richter Scale, well — this isn’t a situation that’s going to remain under wraps for long. And that’s about all we know, apart from the fact that the moment Sadie delivered her baby boy, Clark (named after you-know-who), she thinks she very well may have died. Oh, and for some reason she’s in Palestine now. We’ll see what that’s all about.

Cates takes a more light-hearted and comedic tone with his script than you might expect given its potentially-heavy subject matter, and stylistically this falls somewhere between the absolute play-it-for-laughs tone of his recently-concluded The Paybacks and the more cut-and-dried storytelling of his soon-to-be-wrapped God Country, and on the whole it works. Sadie’s first-person narration is effective in terms of its blunt honesty, and feels pretty well authentic to what a confused pregnant teenager would probably be thinking or feeling. The dialogue draws its characters in fairly broad, one-dimensional strokes, but what the hell? It’s a first issue, and some of these folks’ personalities and motivations are certain to have layers of depth added to them in, I would guess, pretty short order. I certainly can’t quibble with this book’s rapid-fire pacing, that’s for sure, but it’s also nice that things logically hold together here even though the story doesn’t slow down to the point where you really have a chance to examine it in much detail — at least the first time out, at any rate.

Brown, for his part, definitely delivers the goods as far as the art goes — his style is more defined and less “sketchy” than what we saw on Black Road, with a tighter, finer line and greater detail in the characters’ faces and body language, but it’s still fairly ink-heavy and abstract when it needs to be, so if you like what you’ve seen from him before — and I most certainly have — you’re more or less guaranteed to be impressed by the evolution of his overall “look” here. Top it off with some solid, workmanlike colors by Mark Englert, and what you’ve got in your hands is a pretty damn good-looking comic book.

All told, then, I’d have to say that I was reasonably impressed by Babyteeth #1. It didn’t blow me away or anything, but I felt like I got my money’s worth for my $3.99 (which I forked over out of pocket) and it set things up with enough style and panache to hook me for, at the very least, the short term. I’m not going to give it the longest leash in the world, but I have a reasonable amount of confidence that these quite good creators aren’t going to strangle themselves with their own collective umbilical cord.

Story: Donny Cates Art: Garry Brown
Story: 7.0  Art: 8.0  Overall: 7.5  Recommendation: Buy

Review: Babyteeth #1

book_BABYTEETHThe first issue of the new series Babyteeth already has me anxious for what comes next. Writer Donny Cates‘ quick-cut storytelling unfolds in a flashback as the narrator, sixteen-year old Sadie Ritter, tells her son the story of his birth. In just a few short pages, more questions are asked than answered in the best possible way. Who is this mystersious child, born on waves of earthquakes and bringing with him the end of the world? And if the world is over, how is Sadie still getting cell service?

While the story of Babyteeth is unexpected and pleasantly unique, its stand-out qualities most certainly lie in its ink and charcoal style black-and-white art, created by Garry Brown and Mark Englert. The art enhances the storytelling experience through tight zooms and agressive close-ups, enhancing the drama and expanding the suspense for readers even in the space of this premiere 20-page issue.

If subsequent issues follow suite, readers are in for a high-speed story that barely gives you time to come up for air.

Story: Donny Cates Art: Garry Brown
Color: Mark Englert Letterer: Taylor Esposito
Cover A: Garry Brown  Cover B: Elizabeth Torque
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Aftershock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: John Carter: The End #4

John Carter: The End #4

writers: Brian Wood, Alex Cox
artist: Hayden Sherman
covers: Garry Brown (a), Juan Doe (b)
incentive cover: Garry Brown (B/W art), Juan Doe (“virgin art”)
Order the cover of your choice
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

An old man emerges from the Barsoom hinterlands, mad in the head and dressed in tatters.  Could he be the key to bringing down the fascist regime in New Helium?

Preview: John Carter: The End #3

John Carter: The End #3

writers: Brian Wood, Alex Cox
artist: Hayden Sherman
covers: Garry Brown (a), Juan Doe (b)
incentive covers: Garry Brown (B/W art), Juan Doe (“virgin art”)
Fans & retailers, order the cover of your choice!
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

A BROTHERHOOD OF WAR? John and Tars Tarkas work to consolidate power in the hinterlands against the tyrannical force determined to rule Mars…or destroy it in the process.

Preview: John Carter: The End #2

John Carter: The End #2

writer: Brian Wood, Alex Cox
artist: Hayden Sherman
covers: Garry Brown (a), Juan Doe (b)
incentive covers: Garry Brown (B/W art), Juan Doe (“virgin art”)
Fans & retailers, order the cover of your choice!
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

MARS AT WAR. After crash-landing on the ravaged planet, circumstances separate John Carter and Dejah…both literally and ideologically. Despite their centuries of marriage, can a born warrior and Queen survive this most desperate challenge?

Review: The Massive: Ninth Wave HC


In the pages of The Massive Ninth Wave was struggling to repair a broken world. But before that, it was the preeminent global environmental-rescue unit, taking on criminals, polluters, politicians, and rogue states.

Critically acclaimed writer Brian Wood and artist Garry Brown go back to the beginning with the Ninth Wave environmental action unit, sharing stories from the front lines of the eco-war in The Massive: Ninth Wave, now collected.

The Massive: Ninth Wave is environmentalism with a strong sense of action and violence. Ninth Wave is determined to save a world that can’t fight for itself. In doing so, they manage to gain allies and enemies. Through the action, the message is very clear “Take Care of the Earth.” Unlike the main series, this volume is more geared towards stand alone stories that do build a greater picture.

The art is a little on the dark side, with the occasional bright spots in it.  There is a clear contrast seen throughout the book as the issues change. The art manages to solidfy the story in a superb manner.

If you’re into environmental issues and want a good action story, this is one to check out.

Story: Brian Wood Art: Garry Brown
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Revisionist #4

the-revisionist-4-coverReeling from the events of last issue, Martin finds himself stranded in the past with no direction. When a dangerous new foe makes his presence known, Martin will be forced to protect the very targets he swore to destroy! Can Martin stop this new opponent before reality unravels?

Trippy time-traveling science fiction fun. That’s the bet way to describe The Revisionist, but especially this fourth issue. Written by Frank Barbiere, we’re starting to get into those things that make time travel stories so entertaining, the mind trip of it all. What happens as the timeline changes? Will more people get sent back to fix things or change things? That’s the type of stuff that begins to be teased here.

Bouncing between time, it’s not clear exactly what’s going on in each timeline, but it’s just a small piece of the larger time twist. That’s part of the fun of the series, is seeing those pieces come together and play out. The first three issues were just the build up that got us here. Now feels like the real story is beginning. This is the issue we get the first hints as far as the “rules” of time travel in this world. We also get a nemesis for Martin as he forges his own path. While this feels like the true beginning, you’ll still want to read the previous three issues to catch everything.

Garry Brown‘s art is solid and has a raw and dirtiness about it that feels like it fits the time periods various things are taking place in. The tech that exists has a clean style about it compared to the pasts which is a bit rougher in many ways. There’s also some solid action scenes too where a sense of motion really comes into play. It’s a great combo of story and art.

The Revisionist has been fun, really fun. I’m a fan of 80s action films and time travel stories and this comic feels like a combination of the two. The series has been getting better and better as more is added to this world and with this issue it feels like things are really taking off.

Story: Frank Barbiere Art: Garry Brown
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.15 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Read

Graphic Policy was provided with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Lucas Stand #4 (of 6)

Lucas Stand #4 (of 6)

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writers: Kurt Sutter & Caitlin Kittredge
Artist: Jesús Hervás
Cover Artist: Garry Brown
Price: $3.99

Lucas searches for a demon during the Vietnam War and comes across the battlefield where his father died.


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