Tag Archives: garry brown

Preview: Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1

Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1

(W) Saladin Ahmed (A) Garry Brown (CA) Aco
Rated T+
In Shops: Sep 19, 2018
SRP: $4.99

TIES THAT BIND!

Years ago, Spider-Man came back from an alien world with a fantastic new costume – one he eventually learned was a living alien symbiote looking to bond with him permanently! But before he rejected the costume that went on to become VENOM, many a night the symbiote would creep onto Peter, and unbeknownst to its host, take them out into the night!

Now, for the first time, see just what the symbiote steered Peter into during these mysterious nighttime excursions! Saladin Ahmed (BLACK BOLT) weaves an ALL-NEW nightmare fairy tale, illustrated by the incomparable Garry Brown, in what is sure to be a dream book for any Spider-Man fan!

Review: Crude #3

Steve Orlando, Garry Brown, and Lee Loughridge‘s saga of oil rigs, Russian gangs, and revenge takes a turn for the violent as in various guises, Piotr tries to find the person responsible for ordering the hit on his son, Kiril, who went to the dangerous city of Blackstone to start a new life and find a place where he would be free to be a bisexual man even if it’s dangerous. Crude #3 is peppered with flashbacks as Piotr wishes he would be a father, and every twelve hour shift, punch thrown, and bone broken is in service of finding some kind of closure. Except, by the time the issue ends, this mission of vengeance is much more complicated.

Brown and Loughridge’s visuals in Crude #3 run the gamut from explosive to mundane. There’s a twelve, nearly silent panel page showing Piotr’s life as an oil rig worker for evil conglomerate PetroPinnacle, and then several pages later, there’s a huge, orange explosion when rival gang Meshe Adam suicide bombs where he works. These two scenes encapsulate what Piotr’s co-worker Mikhail says the reason why many people go to Blackstone: to make lots of money and experience danger that is the opposite of the rocking chair and watching biathlon on TV life that Piotr settled into back in Crude #1. While still following the throughline of Piotr’s vengeance quest, Orlando and Brown dive face first into the lurid, vile world of Blackstone, including strip clubs, back alleys, rooftops, and bath houses because nothing trips up toxic masculinity like some straight up homoeroticism.

Like almost all of the comics he works on, Lee Loughridge and his color choices set the tone and are the unsung heroes of Crude #3 as well complementing Garry Brown’s combination of scratchy and minimalist inking styles. A sequence featuring the skyscraper HQ of PetroPinnacle has a rancid color palette as sickly, Industrial Revolution-seeming smoke billows surround the tower and instantly signal corruption before a word is spoken or an action is carried out. Later, in the book, Loughridge goes for pure sex with a dark pink palette as Piotr tries to be one of the guys and goes to a strip club after work. Finally, there are the harsh blacks to go with close-ups of pockmarked faces that reminded me of Frank Miller’s work in Sin City when Piotr’s motivation is at his purest: killing the scumbags who murdered his son. Loughridge is a true palette maestro.

Three issues in, and Steve Orlando and Garry Brown have barely scratched the surface of the criminal underworld that runs the oil town of Blackstone, such as PetroPinnacle, the less corporate and more anarchist Meshe Adam, and not super well defined Prava plus the ordinary dock workers and small shop and stand owners that Piotr has sort of become a folk hero to. However, because of its singular focus on Piotr, Crude #3 isn’t bogged down by this “lore” and instead of exposition, we get earthy conversations, street fights, and light stalking of big wigs, who spout corporate, motivational bullshit to workers that experience things on a daily basis that they would never dream of. Piotr is like the protagonist of a good, open world video game: he’s competent at the whole violent thing, agreeable in day to day interactions, and has deep, emotional pain that keeps him sympathetic. Plus he has a whole dark streak from his days as an assassin that could easily come to the forefront thanks to the concluding incidents of this issue and also pops up later on when he starts wrecking a man’s apartment and putting heads through walls just to get a clue for her son’s demise. Brown’s rough speed lines help accentuate the violence in these situations.

Crude #3 has plenty of knock your teeth out and kick mud in your face action, dangerous situations, and emotional turmoil as Steve Orlando, Garry Brown, and Lee Loughridge place Piotr on a hopeless quest for vengeance. For fans of Orlando’s previous work, Crude is more Virgil than JLA and has an added layer of moral uncertainty to go with Loughridge’s fiery, hazy, and ever shifting color palette.

Story: Steve Orlando Art: Garry Brown
Colors: Lee Loughridge Letters: Thomas Mauer
Story: 8.8 Art: 9 Overall: 8.9  Recommendation: Buy 

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Saladin Ahmed Takes on Spider-Man with Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1

What goes bump in the night? The answer might surprise you…

When Spider-Man made his return from an alien world some years ago, he didn’t just come back with new adventures under his belt – he also returned with a special new costume! But Peter soon learned that the costume was more than just a suit…it was a living alien symbiote, and one who had set its sights on bonding to him permanently. Despite rejecting the suit that would eventually become Venom, Peter had no idea that late at night, the symbiote had its own ideas…

This September, prepare for an all-new nightmare fairytale as Hugo nominee Saladin Ahmed, fresh off his Eisner nominated book Black Bolt, takes his acclaimed storytelling to the Spider-verse. Along with superstar artist Garry Brown, the two creators weave a tale of mystery, tension and drama as they answer the question everyone wants to know: just what was the symbiote doing with Peter during those secretive nighttime excursions?

Don’t miss the book that every Spider-fan will be talking about – Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1, in comic shops this September 19th featuring a cover by Aco!

Review: Crude #1

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got a new series from Steve Orlando and Skybound Entertainment!

Crude #1 is by Steve Orlando, Garry Brown, Lee Loughridge, Thomas Mauer, Arielle Basich, and Jon Moisan.

Get your copy in comic shops today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Steve Orlando and Garry Brown team up for Crude

GLAAD Media Award-nominated writer Steve Orlando and acclaimed artist Garry Brown will launch the gritty revenge thriller Crude this April from Image Comics/Skybound Entertainment.

Killers once feared Piotr Petrovich. Now, they’ve sent his son home to him—in a body bag.

Haunted by his failures, Piotr journeys across Russia to learn what type of man his son really was, while hunting the bastards who killed him. And once Piotr finds them, they will learn to fear him once more…

Get ready for an emotional, bone-shattering account of murder, masculinity, and mayhem.

Crude #1 hits comic book stores Wednesday, April 11th. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, March 19th.

Preview: John Carter: The End #5

John Carter: The End #5

writer: Brian Wood, Alex Cox
artist: Hayden Sherman
covers: Garry Brown (a), Juan Doe (b)
incentive cover: Garry Brown (B/W art), Juan Doe (“virgin art”)
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

WORLD WAR MARS! The battle for the fate of Mars kicks off, and from the depths of the planetary core comes a fighting force that has not been seen for a millennium.

Review : Babyteeth #1

Quick — what do you get when you cross Juno with The Omen?

I can’t say I know for sure, but the answer could be the new Aftershock Comics series Babyteeth, the latest from the suddenly-quite-busy Donny Cates, cooked up in collaboration with Black Road artist/co-creator Garry Brown, which seems right off the bat to be a mash-up of those two popular films, but who knows? It could prove to be something else entirely as events proceed.

Here’s the run-down : 16-year-old Sadie of Salt Lake City, Utah, is more than just a nerdy social outcast comic book fan — she’s also pregnant. The old man — whoever he may be — isn’t around. She’s managed to keep her condition a secret from everyone barring her dope-dealing sister, Heather, but when her first contraction register a 5.0 on the fucking Richter Scale, well — this isn’t a situation that’s going to remain under wraps for long. And that’s about all we know, apart from the fact that the moment Sadie delivered her baby boy, Clark (named after you-know-who), she thinks she very well may have died. Oh, and for some reason she’s in Palestine now. We’ll see what that’s all about.

Cates takes a more light-hearted and comedic tone with his script than you might expect given its potentially-heavy subject matter, and stylistically this falls somewhere between the absolute play-it-for-laughs tone of his recently-concluded The Paybacks and the more cut-and-dried storytelling of his soon-to-be-wrapped God Country, and on the whole it works. Sadie’s first-person narration is effective in terms of its blunt honesty, and feels pretty well authentic to what a confused pregnant teenager would probably be thinking or feeling. The dialogue draws its characters in fairly broad, one-dimensional strokes, but what the hell? It’s a first issue, and some of these folks’ personalities and motivations are certain to have layers of depth added to them in, I would guess, pretty short order. I certainly can’t quibble with this book’s rapid-fire pacing, that’s for sure, but it’s also nice that things logically hold together here even though the story doesn’t slow down to the point where you really have a chance to examine it in much detail — at least the first time out, at any rate.

Brown, for his part, definitely delivers the goods as far as the art goes — his style is more defined and less “sketchy” than what we saw on Black Road, with a tighter, finer line and greater detail in the characters’ faces and body language, but it’s still fairly ink-heavy and abstract when it needs to be, so if you like what you’ve seen from him before — and I most certainly have — you’re more or less guaranteed to be impressed by the evolution of his overall “look” here. Top it off with some solid, workmanlike colors by Mark Englert, and what you’ve got in your hands is a pretty damn good-looking comic book.

All told, then, I’d have to say that I was reasonably impressed by Babyteeth #1. It didn’t blow me away or anything, but I felt like I got my money’s worth for my $3.99 (which I forked over out of pocket) and it set things up with enough style and panache to hook me for, at the very least, the short term. I’m not going to give it the longest leash in the world, but I have a reasonable amount of confidence that these quite good creators aren’t going to strangle themselves with their own collective umbilical cord.

Story: Donny Cates Art: Garry Brown
Story: 7.0  Art: 8.0  Overall: 7.5  Recommendation: Buy

Review: Babyteeth #1

book_BABYTEETHThe first issue of the new series Babyteeth already has me anxious for what comes next. Writer Donny Cates‘ quick-cut storytelling unfolds in a flashback as the narrator, sixteen-year old Sadie Ritter, tells her son the story of his birth. In just a few short pages, more questions are asked than answered in the best possible way. Who is this mystersious child, born on waves of earthquakes and bringing with him the end of the world? And if the world is over, how is Sadie still getting cell service?

While the story of Babyteeth is unexpected and pleasantly unique, its stand-out qualities most certainly lie in its ink and charcoal style black-and-white art, created by Garry Brown and Mark Englert. The art enhances the storytelling experience through tight zooms and agressive close-ups, enhancing the drama and expanding the suspense for readers even in the space of this premiere 20-page issue.

If subsequent issues follow suite, readers are in for a high-speed story that barely gives you time to come up for air.

Story: Donny Cates Art: Garry Brown
Color: Mark Englert Letterer: Taylor Esposito
Cover A: Garry Brown  Cover B: Elizabeth Torque
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Aftershock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: John Carter: The End #4

John Carter: The End #4

writers: Brian Wood, Alex Cox
artist: Hayden Sherman
covers: Garry Brown (a), Juan Doe (b)
incentive cover: Garry Brown (B/W art), Juan Doe (“virgin art”)
Order the cover of your choice
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

An old man emerges from the Barsoom hinterlands, mad in the head and dressed in tatters.  Could he be the key to bringing down the fascist regime in New Helium?

Preview: John Carter: The End #3

John Carter: The End #3

writers: Brian Wood, Alex Cox
artist: Hayden Sherman
covers: Garry Brown (a), Juan Doe (b)
incentive covers: Garry Brown (B/W art), Juan Doe (“virgin art”)
Fans & retailers, order the cover of your choice!
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

A BROTHERHOOD OF WAR? John and Tars Tarkas work to consolidate power in the hinterlands against the tyrannical force determined to rule Mars…or destroy it in the process.

« Older Entries