Tag Archives: david f. walker

Review: Discombobulated: Mistook

DISCOMBOBULATED: MISTOOK

Misunderstandings happen every day which is why communication is so crucial. You never want to have your intentions, actions, or words to be misconstrued. As a single cisgender male, I often wonder if a smile or being friendly may be taken the wrong way. I cannot count on my hands how many times women have taken it as me hitting on them and just not being friendly.

Then there are times when I show interest and the women do not find me attractive or only see me as a friend. This is a constant struggle for most men. You want to be yourself but you don’t want to come off the wrong way either. In the fifth story arc of the hilarious and relevant Discombobulated, our protagonist has gotten caught up in a rather awkward situation.

We find David, free from Annie, out with a new male friend, who he soon finds out misconstrued their encounter as a date and assumed he was bisexual. As his new friend’s initial assumption is based on his social media profile, leading to why he thought David was in the first place. As David’s new friend starts to explain why he thought David was bisexual, he eventually objectifies him. By story’s end, even though David is not attracted to him, he attempts to break things off amicably.

Overall, a funny chapter that shows the complexity of perception. The story by David F. Walker is appealing and enjoyable. The art by DJ Parnell and Marcus Kwame is striking. Altogether, a story that shows how important first impressions are.

Story: David F Walker Art: DJ Parnell  & Marcus Kwame
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Discombobulated: The Alter(ed) Ego

DISCOMBOBULATED – “The Alter(ed) Ego”

As a child of the 1980s, I can honestly say I did not know how unique of a decade it was. This is when popular culture was at its height, as can be seen today in all the revivals in every medium. This is no coincidence as many of us who grew up then are now parents and in some cases grandparents. All of John Hughes movies are now considered classics and it also was the decade that gave us names like Stallone and Schwarzenegger.

As iconic as television shows of the decade were, there was something also unique about the movies. It gave us Goonies and Risky Business, and Revenge of the Nerds. As with many movies, not all were good, but many were well-intentioned, like the movie, Hunk, which was about how a computer nerd made a deal with the Devil to get a muscled up body. In the third story arc of the hilarious and relevant Discombobulated, our protagonist has a conversation with his better self if he actually worked out and ate healthily

We find David, as he sees an athletic version of himself, as it tells him everything he knew but didn’t want to hear. As this alter ego digs more into his insecurities, even into his own racial identity, where its pointed out this version is darker in complexion. David finally realizes that those insecurities serve him no purpose, as everyone has them, and he should not feel bad for having them. By story’s end, he realizes his own self hatred is his own worst enemy .

Overall, a ruckus episode that is both self-deprecating and hilarious. The story by David F. Walker is appealing and amusing. The art by DJ Parnell and Von Porter is stunning. Altogether, a story that shows introspection is good only for a time.

Story: David F Walker Art: DJ Parnell and Von Porter
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Discombobluated: Reconsillyation

DISCOMBOBLUATED: RECONSILLYATION

When it comes to most wars across the world, the facts of the war are pretty much not up for dispute. Historians can agree on what happened at the Battle Of Normandy. Then there are wars where “facts” depend on who tells it. Take, for instance, the Mexican American War, where they view Pancho Villa as a hero while America has looked at him as an antagonist.  

James Bowie and William B. Travis, are considered heroes of the Alamo, while Mexican history has always looked at them as agitators. Then there is the whole drama behind the War Of 1812, where to this day, no one can agree who won that war. This becomes even more entangled in personal relationships, where no one can agree on anything. In the eighth story arc of the hilarious and relevant Discombobulated, David tries to amicably come to terms with Annie.  

We find David, meeting Annie, where she assumes he is there to apologize to her for any misgivings, but he is looking for a more equitable end. As David soon realizes that there is no middle ground with her, as she takes liberties with his amenability, as she thinks his olive branch is his way of them getting back together. David eventually takes his apology back and understands immediately that reaching back out to her was a mistake. By the story’s end, David finally realizes how silly reconciliation is and decides to go back to his therapist.

Overall, a fascinating chapter which shows the ills of dealing with exes. The story by David F. Walker is side-splitting. The art by DJ Parnell is wonderful. Altogether, a story that gives an honest look at reconciliation.

Story: David F. Walker Art: DJ Parnell 
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Young Justice #15

Young Justice #15

Young Justice versus S.T.A.R. Labs! What happens when a universe reboots right under you? Conner is about to find out! The entire Young Justice team confronts the evil genius behind S.T.A.R. Labs and the truth about Conner Kent. Young Justice #15 wraps up the current story arc while setting up what’s to come.

Conner Kent is back and the truth about how he fits into the DC Universe is revealed. Writers Brian Michael Bendis and David Walker wrap up this story arc with a fun and wild ride of a finale. Conner has been absent for years in DC, so where has he been? Bendis and Walker give us a simple answer in a way, an explanation that we’ve seen in other stories and media. It’s not a complicated reason and easy to accept and move on.

There’s a really intelligent direction about this in that it allows the reader to focus more on the interaction of the characters more. That’s where a lot of the strength of this series lays. There’s an energy and enthusiasm from the characters that’s fitting for their age. There’s also a sense of love and family that radiates from the page. You really get the sense these are heroes who are happy their friend is back, even the characters who didn’t know him. There’s lots of humor as everyone has their moment and quips fly around. It’s just a fun comic with a lot of energy.

Part of that enthusiasm is due to the art of John Timms and Scott Godlewski. Along with colors by Gabe Eltaeb and letterer Wes Abbott, there’s a lot packed in every panel. There’s a lot of characters here but it works. The fact there’s so many characters packed into the issue is a challenge, but Timms and Godlewski know exactly where to focus and where to put in some visual jokes as well. A facial expression or stance is used to tell the story and what a character might be thinking. Eltaeb’s colors pop on the page and deliver a vibe that matches the youthful exuberance of the series.

Young Justice #15 is a solid finale to the storyline delivering a simple explanation for a character’s absence. The reuniting of the team feels like the old friends back together like it should be. It ties into DC’s meta story well without shaking things up too much but also playing off of mysteries established years ago. It also sets up something to come that has been teased since this series launched. Young Justice #15 sets up an interesting team for the future bringing together the younger heroes in a large group that will hopefully rotate the members delivering something regularly new going forward. It’s a fun series that sticks to the more positive attitude of “Rebirth” and full of potential.

Story: Brian Michael Bendis, David F. Walker Art: John Timms, Scott Godlewski
Color: Gabe Eltaeb Letterer: Wes Abbott
Story: 7.5 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read


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Review: Discombobulated: Irrationality For the Win

DISCOMBOBULATED: IRRATIONALITY FOR THE WIN

Your inner voice is usually what people think of as their conscience. We rarely look at is as our worst enemy, that thing that holds us back or give us doubt in our motives and actions. Sometimes, we also fail to realize it is our based instinct.

It may be that “spidey sense” that a tingle when we feel something is wrong. It can lead us to places where we would never dream of or meeting the type of people we usually don’t commiserate with. It may even lead us to find that special somebody. In the seventh story arc of the hilarious and relevant Discombobulated, David has a crisis, is it real or imagined; only he can answer it.  

We find David, by himself, as he feels something is wrong, which is when his inner voice pops up struggling to calm him down. David feels he is having a heart attack while his inner voice warns him it is nothing but an anxiety attack. David’s inner voice finally succumbs as he realizes that it may be a heart attack.

Overall, an intriguing chapter which illustrates how such maladies occur. The story by David F. Walker is comical. The art by DJ Parnell is terrific. Altogether, a story that illustrates just how much stress occurs in things like anxiety attacks.

Story: David F. Walker Art: DJ Parnell 
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Discombobulated: Therapy Sessions Part 4

DISCOMBOBULATED: THERAPY SESSIONS PART 4

Leaders come in all shades and colors. There are those understanding people but cannot lead those individuals to do work. Then there are those who understand through discipline, as I used to see in the military, where they think that you should listen to them because of their position. Transition to civilian life often is difficult for these people as they soon find out that ordinary citizens could care less for who they were and definitely not for who they are.

Then there are those whom we call “non- confrontational politicians”. These people tend to often cower at the first sight of standing up for anything. Needless to say, they often make horrible supervisors but are rampant in every workplace one can think of. In the sixth story arc of the hilarious and relevant Discombobulated, we find that our protagonist hates confrontation, a flaw which has caused him more damage in his personal life.

We find David back at his therapist’s office talking about how his latest relationship with Annie. It seems to be a pattern of looking for toxic partners. He divulges that he faked his own death to get out of his relationship with her. David’s therapist brings to light the fact that his recent act of faking his own death reveals a substantial fear of confrontation. By story’s end, David’s therapist shows him that though Annie traumatized him that it also paralyzed his social life.

Overall, an intriguing chapter which shows just how much of a drain relationships can be. The story by David F. Walker is interesting and amusing. The art by DJ Parnell is outstanding. Altogether, a story that shows the scars relationships leave long after they are over.

Story: David F Walker Art: DJ Parnell 
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Preview: Young Justice #15

Young Justice #15

(W) Brian Michael Bendis, David F. Walker (A/CA) John Timms
In Shops: Jun 17, 2020
SRP: $3.99

Young Justice versus S.T.A.R. Labs! What happens when a universe reboots right under you? Conner is about to find out! The entire Young Justice team confronts the evil genius behind S.T.A.R. Labs and the truth about Conner Kent. This will bring Conner to the doorstep of his namesake, Clark Kent, to find out more about himself and the DC Universe. Guest-starring Superman in a unique crossover with Action Comics.

Young Justice #15

Review: Discombobulated: Let the Pandemic Special Shine a Light on Me

DISCOMBOBULATED: LET THE PANDEMIC SPECIAL SHINE A LIGHT ON ME

Our current reality is something we only imagined in a piece of fiction. For those who saw the movie Contagion, did we really ever believe it could get as bad? Then things took a nosedive leading to a pandemic.

We find ourselves in a real-life version of that movie and similar stories. Choices have become a bit more difficult. We find ourselves as both protagonist and antagonist in our real-life comedy/drama. Everyone is left to make choices both hard and possibly detrimental. In the latest story arc of the hilarious and relevant Discombobulated, David survives the pandemic

We find David, coming to terms with people’s opinion about the strip and whether to continue, which he finally concludes, it doesn’t matter, he should be heard. He reasons out with his therapist that his behavior and his role in each of his relationships is the cause of his stress, leading to a night of sleeplessness. As the pandemic sets in, so does his mind, as he struggles to distract himself, and like many of us, boredom becomes the struggle.

Overall, another great installment that definitely delivers. The story by David F. Walker is heartfelt. The art by Quinn McGowan is astonishing. Altogether, an arc that holds a mirror up to our unusual normal.

Story: David F. Walker Art: Quinn McGowan
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Discombobulated: The Develop-Mental Years

DISCOMBOBULATED: THE DEVELOP-MENTAL YEARS

Every hero has an origin story. Not everyone is tragic or realistic, but there is always a spark somewhere and sometime. Some of their stories start when they are already the people you know them to be. Take, for instance, the last season of Ray Donovan, where we found how he came to be and what lead to his sister’s death.

We find out just how much of a deadbeat sad Mickey was to his kids. We find out just how Ray had to grow up so fast and become such an evasive enforcer. The introspection gave viewers empathy and relevance. In the twelfth story arc of the hilarious and relevant Discombobulated, David F. Walker takes the reader to the scene of the crime.

We find David, in another argument with Annie who insists he has changed which both infuriates and scares him and where he has a hilarious interlude where he argues with himself. As we are taken to his formative years, where he had had a more naïve view of his identity, one that infuriates his teachers, but a fight brings bigger light to the racial disparity in his school. We are taken back to the present day, where David’s therapist shows him that despite his efforts to talk the issues through this comic, it has come at a greater cost. By story’s end, David realizes that some of his issues stem from the fact he never really got to know his father

Overall, an excellent chapter to the webcomic series. The story by Walker is sincere. The art by Quinn McGowan is extraordinary. Altogether, this arc shows just how much Walker is willing to show his readers.

Story: David F. Walker Art: Quinn McGowan
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Preview: Young Justice #14

Young Justice #14

(W) Brian Michael Bendis, David F. Walker (A/CA) John Timms
In Shops: Mar 11, 2020
SRP: $3.99

Now that Young Justice has figured out who the bad guys are, it’s time to bring the fight to S.T.A.R. Labs’ front door! But the combined forces of Dial H for Hero, the Wonder Twins, Naomi, and the entire Young Justice roster may not be enough to defeat these evil scientists. It’s time to call in some super-powered backup…the new Young Justice! Plus, how will Superman revealing his secret identity affect Conner Kent?

Young Justice #14
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