Tag Archives: dave simmons

Review: Green Hornet: Dark Tomorrow #3

Green Hornet: Dark Tomorrow #3

Paul Newman is one of those actors whose onscreen magnetism is matched by his talent. His role in The Hustler gave audiences someone to both hate and love and the empathy grew for the character in the sequel many years later, Color Of Money. His later roles were even better than when he was in his prime, as he possessed the gravitas in most scenes than most actors in a lifetime.

One of my favorite roles by him was in Nobody’s Fool, a slice of life film which probably mirrored how we were on a personal level. The one movie which I believed was his best role and probably the one, even though he won an Oscar for it, is still his most underrated role, was in The Verdict. He plays a lawyer whose current case sets him on a course to change the way he does things and the why. This is why stories about characters who seek out redemption draws readers to them. The optimist in all of us would like to see the good in everyone. In the final issue of Green Hornet: Dark Tomorrow, we find our titular hero being the good guy again, as he seeks to put the Steel Syndicate away, for the last time.

We catch up with the Green Hornet and Kato, as he actively recovers from the events of the last issue, and they resolve to work with each other to put down the Steel Syndicate. AS the two walk into a trap set by the Syndicate, they fight their way to the bosses, using their weaknesses as robots to destroy them. As this leads to a final battle between the Green Hornet and the Head of the Steel Syndicate, one where his true nature prevails.

Overall, a story that shows redemption is possible for anyone. The story by Clint McElroy brings this series to its logical conclusion. The art by the creative team is stunning. Altogether, a final issue that ends the story in the best way possible.

Story: Clint McElroy Art: Dave Simons and Jeff Butler
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Hornet: Dark Tomorrow #2

Green Hornet: Dark Tomorrow #2

There will be people in your lives that only come into it but for a moment. You’ll question the reason behind it for days, months, and even years. You will remember how they made you feel, made you laugh, or how they infuriated you. That’s the crazy thing about crossing paths, it can be for a day or it can be for a lifetime.

Your strongest bonds tend to be an accident, at least in my experience. In the show A Million Little Things, a group of friends bond over the one day they got stuck in an elevator. That’s why when long-standing bonds break, more often than not, people grow apart. In the second issue of Green Hornet: Dark Tomorrow, we find our titular hero fighting a one-time confidant.

We catch up with the Green Hornet as he fights Kato. It’s a tense fight where we find out exactly who these two are to each other, and it’s not what you think. Meanwhile, the Steel Syndicate looks to finally end the Green Hornet once and for all by setting a trap. Fortunately, Kato riding a flying Black Beauty comes to the rescue. It all leads to daring action and pulp adventure.

Overall, a story that only causes the series to get darker. The story by Clint McElroy is action-packed. The art by the creative team of Dave Simmons and Jeff Butler is gorgeous. Altogether, an issue that elevates the story.

Story: Clint McElroyArt: Dave Simons and Jeff Butler
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Hornet: Dark Tomorrow #1

GREEN HORNET DARK TOMORROW#1

When does one realize that one has become the thing, they hate the most? This is the central pushing point of antiheroes in many of America’s favorite television shows. They’re not completely good but not a villain because they have good intentions at the end of the day.  You can take any character from Walter White to Ray Donovan, and there always more than a few slivers of good-heartedness which makes the audience ultimately pull for them.

These characters make us all reexamine ourselves even to the things we can never admit to. This is what makes the Godfather trilogy so captivating and so heartbreaking. Michael Corleone’s arc is in any other setting with different choices the journey of men looking to do better for their families. In the debut issue of Green Hornet: Dark Tomorrow, we find our titular hero becoming the type of villain he used to stop.

We are taken to the late 21st century, where technology has only made crime even more diverse and on this particular night, as on crime boss closes a deal, a surprising figure emerges the Green Hornet. As one would expect to stop these criminals, this Green Hornet is there to take his cut of what is going down, which is far cry from the Britt Reid we know and love, as he uses his devices to take all the money and remind them whose city it is. It soon becomes apparent that he has a rival on the rise, and who is taking over all his product houses, The Steel Syndicate who aren’t only taking his businesses but are also killing innocent people along the way. By the issue’s end, we find out what leads to him to where he is and a traitor comes for his head.

Overall, a story that feels if you lived in the dark future of Back To The Future Part II but with superheroes. The story by Clint McElroy is smart, well-paced, and strongly characterized. The art by the creative team complements the story. Altogether, a story that shows audiences just how powerful certain choices can be.

Story: Clint McElroy Art: Dave Simons and Jeff Butler
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy