Tag Archives: c2e2

C2E2 2019: Interview with Punk Mambo Writer Cullen Bunn

Cullen Bunn is one of the most prolific comic book writers of the past decade. He has worked on Dark Horse’s Eisner nominated horror comic Harrow County, The Sixth Gun for Oni Press, comics like Sinestro and Earth 2 World’s End for DC, and worked extensively on titles starring Deadpool, the X-Men, and Venom for Marvel. Now, he turns his attention to Valiant where he will be writing the first solo series for Victoria Greaves-Trott aka Punk Mambo, a British voodoo priestess created by Peter Milligan and Roberto de la Torre as a supporting character in their relaunch of Shadowman.

Due to sickness, I wasn’t able to chat with Bunn in person at C2E2 about Punk Mambo, but was able to interview him via email.

Graphic Policy: Punk Mambo has had a lot of guest appearances in Valiant books since 2013, but apart from a one-shot, she’s never had a series of her own.  Why is now the perfect time for her to have one, and how will the solo series explore her character?

Cullen Bunn: Valiant is launching several new titles, offering readers something fresh and exciting with new characters and new settings and new adventures. Punk Mambo is a character a lot of readers might be unfamiliar with. She is a great gateway to Valiant’s supernatural world. I’m hoping this new initiative will bring in readers unfamiliar with the character, and maybe even unfamiliar with Valiant as a whole. I’ve talked to many people, who know little or nothing about Punk Mambo, but who are interested in finding out more now that there is a spotlight on her!

GP: Punk Mambo is one of several new #1’s for Valiant. How will you make this series accessible to new readers?

CB: I have written this series in such a way that you need not know anything about this character in order to enjoy the book. In a lot of ways, I’m treating this like her first appearance. Yes, if you are familiar with the character, you’ll get something different out of the book than if it is your first encounter with Punk, but first time readers will not be lost at all. Punk narrates this book so she brings the reader right along with her. And she’s encountering new threats, new enemies, and new allies; most of whom are appearing for the first time in this book.

GP: Punk Mambo is set in Haiti instead of New Orleans or London. What does this new setting bring to the series?

CB: I have written a lot about New Orleans of late, and I love the city as a setting for this kind of story, but I thought it would be fun to bring Punk Mambo to an area where we haven’t seen her. That gives us fertile ground to tell a new tale and keep the characters (and the readers) on their toes. This is a corner of the Valiant Universe we haven’t really seen, and it fits so perfectly with Punk’s ties to voodoo.

Or it doesn’t.

Part of what I wanted to do here is show that Punk Mambo doesn’t really fit into the typical voodoo paradigms. We get to play her against aspects of traditional voodoo culture, and I love that sort of thing. 

GP: How did you write to Adam Gorham’s specific strengths as an artist in Punk Mambo?

CB: Punk Mambo needed to feel action-packed and fun and a little dirty. Adam manages to bring that aesthetic to every panel of every page. The action is kinetic and frenzied. The horror beats are scary as Hell. I’m so lucky to be working with him on this book. 

GP: Even though it’s technically a superhero universe, Valiant has always had a strong supernatural corner. What will you add to that corner in Punk Mambo?

CB: With this story, I want to establish Punk Mambo as a kind of roaming paranormal investigator. Only, she doesn’t just investigate paranormal threats. She kicks their teeth in. I also wanted to expand the “pantheon” of voodoo spirits and gods. Finally, I’m introducing a couple of new villains to the Valiant Universe. These villains will be firmly rooted in the supernatural.

GP: Punk Mambo has an interesting relationship between her and her various Loas. How will you develop these relationships in her own series?

CB: The relationship with the Loa—and with voodoo as a whole—will be a key part of this series. You’ll see both sides of this… partnership. Punk Mambo has been using the Loa for some time now, and she never really stops to consider how the Loa feel about that. 

GP: You have a strong background in horror comics, and Punk Mambo seems to have some horror elements. What are some tricks you use as a writer to make a comic frightening and/or unsettling?

CB: It’s important in a horror comic to make the reader worry about the characters. There are real threats facing Punk Mambo, and if I’ve done my job, you’ll care about her and worry if she’ll survive or not. In a book like this, no one is safe so don’t assume that having a character’s name in the title means that character will make it to the end.

GP: A lot of your recent works (Dark Ark, Blossoms 666, Punk Mambo) have touched on religious elements or rituals. What do you find fascinating about faith and belief, and why do you continue to incorporate them in your stories?

CB: I’ve always been fascinated by faith and by ceremony and by the rules associated with religion. All these different characters allow me to approach those things from different angles, to pull at the frayed edges from different directions, and to explore my own questions without really smashing the reader over the head with them. My hope is that readers will come away with their own questions and their own answers. With Punk Mambo, I really wanted to look into the rules of faith and how someone who doesn’t follow any rules might still be faithful.

Punk Mambo #1 is set to be released on April 24.

Follow Cullen Bunn on Twitter.

C2E2 2019: Interview with Writer Ryan Cady

On Sunday at C2E2, I had the opportunity to talk with writer Ryan Cady about his work on the Image/Top Cow sci-fi series Infinite Dark with artist Andrea Mutti as well as his upcoming Z2 graphic novel, Genesis 1 about Internet music star Poppy that he is co-writing with Poppy and Titanic Sinclair. Previously, Cady has done work for Marvel (Old Man Logan), DC (New Talent Showcase), Lion Forge (Rolled and Told), and Archie (Big Moose) as well as co-writing the Magdalena relaunch for Top Cow with Tini Howard.

Graphic Policy: You were a part of the DC Talent Development Workshop. How did that impact your work on Infinite Dark?

Ryan Cady: I developed Infinite Dark before the workshop and started scripting halfway through the workshop. When I started Infinite Dark, it was much more isolated story, and Scott Snyder, in the workshop, was good about getting us to examine higher stakes. From the beginning, Infinite Dark was going to be an end of the universe/last people on Earth story.

The initial pitch was more inward, character focused and weird Grant Morrison-y stuff. Not that’s a bad thing. I love that stuff and could do it well. After working with Scott and the DC projects in the class and focusing on the balance between character and action, I really decided to start ramping things up. And, obviously, something like [the workshop] makes you a better writer. It’s 10 weeks of doing scripts, getting them reviewed by not just Scott Snyder, but a bunch of really talented peers and examining your own work really critically. It forces you to think “What do I suck at? How do I need to get better?”

GP: From the first page of Infinite Dark, it’s all about staring into the abyss. How do you get into the zone to write about characters who gaze into literal nothingness?

RC: When I was really developing Infinite Dark in earnest, I was in the midst of a really bad depression. I kind of had the basic ideas there, but when I sat down to write the project, I was really miserable. At that point, it felt like a bleak work. (This was before the DC Workshop.)

When it came time to script, I focused a lot on staring into [nothingness] and overcoming it and survival as a virtue. In the script, I tried to tiptoe between those two. About how coming out of this I feel stronger and what it means to survive the worst year of your life versus diving back into those feelings a little bit if I wanna get grim. Sometimes, to write the darkest parts of the book, I have to dive back into those bad, weird feelings because it’s my first creator owned story.

GP: Infinite Dark has a big monster in the book called the Entity that I really enjoyed. What was your inspiration for them?

RC: In the very original pitch for the book, the Entity was something that claims to be God. I’m not an atheist, but I really thought the “No, fuck you, God” idea would be a cool take. God, in the original pitch, was like “I seem like a monster, but it’s because I need to create a new universe, and you guys are getting in the way.” [The protagonist] Deva was going to shoot God. That was the very Grant Morrison part of it. God was going to be like “I made you guys. You’re the best thing I ever made, but I’m making a new thing.” And Deva was gonna be like “No, you made us to survive.” and shoot God.

That was early days. It’s changed a lot since then. The initial idea was always the shadows. A thing you can’t understand, not even a Lovecraftian thing from beyond, but something that doesn’t interact with physics like we do.

GP: My favorite character in Infinite Dark was Smith, the A.I. I love him so much. In a lot of these kind of sci-fi stories, the A.I. is always evil. Why did you decide to make Smith more of a humanist and an ally to humanity?

RC: Thank you for that reading. I’m always antsy if it’s going to make it in or not. I play with [the humanism] a lot in the next volume without spoiling anything. Because that’s such a trope, I believe we as people are always like “The next thing is going to usurp us.” It’s tied into the whole killing God thing. This thing we made is going to hate us for a reason, maybe, because we think we’re putting our worst selves in it.

But my whole thing with Smith is that I don’t know if I believe in that trope. [Some] people (Granted a lot of people who work in tech and in Silicon Valley are awful and scary technocrats.) make stuff earnestly with the idea you would make a life with the idea of “This is designed to love all the good things about humanity.” Smith’s creators are like “We believe in all these things.” I wanted to emphasize that and double play on “The A.I. is so evil.”, but not at all.

My favorite thing that I’ve written for the whole series is Smith’s speech in issue 3. I’m glad people liked it, and it landed. When I wrote this, I turned to my girlfriend and said, “I never say this, but I’m really proud of what I wrote here.” This is great, but the rest of the issue sucks.

GP: Yeah, that speech is awesome. Lots of text, but it’s definitely one of things I’ll remember about Infinite Dark.

So, the antagonists of Infinite Dark are the technolinguists. How did you come up with this cool, sci-fi concept?

RC: The idea came up because I’m not good with computers. Also, it makes sense if you’re setting a story fifty years from now to extrapolate what we have. Infinite Dark takes place 10,000 years from now so computing is going to be something that’s so fundamentally different. There’s the idea of people who can interact with this future’s version of code on an informational language level. Linguistically, they interact with computers.

I made them bad guys because really early on, there was a notion that the Entity could interact with them because the techno-language they speak is similar to the fundamental building blocks of reality. You know that theory that the universe is just a VR simulation? In Infinite Dark, they have simulations they go into sometimes, and we wanted to play with that. If we end up having more issues then these eight, I might go into that even deeper.

GP: Yeah, I Googled “technolinguists”, and I guess they’re not a thing yet.

RC: They’re antagonists, but they might not be bad guys.

GP: Your book’s definitely in a moral grey area.

RC: I like to play with that when I can. Except Smith. He’s just good.

GP: Could you tease the upcoming arc of Infinite Dark?

RC: The next volume of four issues starts in April, and without spoiling anything if you haven’t read the first volume, weeks have passed in issue five. But it’s not gonna feel like “Bam, bam, things are happening again.” It’s a lot of aftermath and cleanup stuff. But, also, oops, an act of saving everybody doesn’t necessarily save everybody. There’s still so many things that can go horribly wrong.

It’s very character conflict focused. All these people have survived the end of the universe twice, and yet, that alone is not enough to have them cooperate and get along because we have such fundamentally different ideas about what it means to do the right thing. How do these people faced with impossible choices, who have survived so much, reconcile that? I talk a lot philosophically in the book about survival being a virtue, but this arc is about what the next “good is. If we survive, how do we move past that.

GP: Like the whole “survive and thrive” Pinterest board idea.

RC: Yeah, we’ve reached “survive” on our Pinterest board. How do we “thrive” without it becoming worse or inequality or dooming ourselves again?

GP: I had a couple questions about the Poppy graphic novel Genesis 1. With these musician graphic novel projects, I’m really curious about how much input Poppy had on the graphic novel and what that collaborative process was like. She has all those YouTube followers.

RC: I’ve never met Poppy because she’s a robot, probably. I’m sure she’s very nice and only has our best interests at heart. And her church is not a cult. I’ve been given absolute freedom, and I speak in total earnestness. This is 100% me and mine. I’m nobody’s mouthpiece. This is my version of her story, and I believe it 100% and am not part of a cult.

GP: A lot of Poppy’s ideas are about how she’s beyond humanity and is very post-human. Why is her origin story being told in an older medium like comics?

RC: Even though it’s an older medium, comics is still really dynamic. It’s not limited to what you can get across on one side in a YouTube video. It’s not limited by time. I talked to an editor who brilliantly said, “In comics more than any medium, you can do a good job of controlling the flow of time.”

Also, there’s a weird element of apocrypha to it. Is this Poppy’s origin story? It’s this comic, and we play on this in the story. If this is really Poppy’s gospel and her origin, why would it be in this graphic novel? Why would it be told in this way, and how would that be obtained? Is the story true? Is the story stolen? It’s about to get too religious in here. We’re playing a lot with a sense of time and futurism, and how that blends with the occult and weird hacker people.

Infinite Dark #5 is set to be released on April 10, 2019 from Image/Top Cow Comics. Genesis One will be released in summer 2019 from Z2 Comics.

Follow Ryan Cady on Twitter.

C2E2 2019: Interview with Cecil Castellucci

Cecil Castellucci

Cecil Castellucci is a talented novelist, comic book writer, and musician, who won a Joe Shuster Award for her work on 2007’s The Plain Janes. Recently, she has written the comics Shade the Changing Girl and Shade the Changing Woman for DC Comics’ Young Animal imprint. At C2E2, I had the opportunity to chat with Castellucci at the DC Comics booth about her new series, Female Furies, that brings the Me Too Movement to Jack Kirby’s Fourth World.

Graphic Policy: I’m a big fan of your Young Animal work, like Shade the Changing Girl and Shade the Changing Woman. Why should fans of Shade check out Female Furies?

Cecil Castellucci: With Shade, I was looking at what [Steve] Ditko did and what [Peter] Milligan did, and I was trying to honor and echo some of things they did. But then me and Marley [Zarcone] would stake our own claim to that universe. I feel like with Female Furies, I’m looking at Kirby and his magnificent work and looking at the Female Furies and trying to put it through a different lens.

Shade the Changing Girl is dealing with a lot of the things that original Shade did and Milligan’s Shade did, but where Milligan explored a lot of darkness and cruelty, I staked a claim to heart. It complements it. I feel the same way with Female Furies. I think that Tom King did an amazing job with Mister Miracle, and it’s just got a tenderness to it. It’s very domestic drama and asked, “What does it mean to be a man? What does it mean to be a father?” Those are wonderful things. I’m taking those same characters. Just like he took one lens on it that was different than Kirby, I’m taking a completely different lens from the same characters and showing a different point of view. One thing I love about these characters is that they’re so flexible and can withstand being put through their paces in a different way.

GP: Speaking of these characters, I came into Female Furies expecting for it to focus on Big Barda because she’s a popular, big name character. But you decided to focus on Aurelie. Why did you decide to do that?

CC: One thing I knew going in was that I was going to do the Me Too movement on Apokolips. And a feminist awakening on Apokolips. When I read the whole Fourth World omnibus, it really struck me how women and the Furies were talked about. They’re on the side all the time. They never really go to battle. They’re on the fringes. They’re badasses, but they’re on the side.

So, I wanted to bring their story forward. But, also, the way in those original texts that their bodies are talked about and the way that Granny Goodness is in charge of the children when she’s an equal too. I wanted to look at that and focus on that. When I read Kirby’s Mister Miracle, I discovered the character of Aurelie, who is Barda’s inciting incident. She is Barda’s origin story. When I read that issue, I was like “This is a way in to tell this story” because it’s part of the original thing, but it’s expanding who Aurelie is and how she got to Himon’s place. And the dancing. I really tried to stitch that in.

GP: Why is the Fourth World such a good setting about gender inequality in the world?

CC: I want to go back and say that even though I’m focusing on Aurelie, I still think that my Female Furies is the story of Granny and Big Barda. It’s just the way we’re gonna get there.

First of all, I think that the Fourth World is operatic. It is enormous with highs and lows and drama and betrayal. And Apokolips is also a hell planet. So, when you’re talking about really hard things with bad guys, you can go harsher than what you would do if it was reality or Earth based and dial up the tension of the horribleness of systemic misogyny, of sexual harassment and abuse in that way.

I think that it made it a great landscape to explore the current issues. Sometimes, it’s hard for us when we’re living in a moment in time to look at that moment in time. When it’s in outer space on hell planet, I don’t want to say it’s easier because it’s not. But it is.

GP: Yes, Female Furies is a tough read.

CC: It’s tough to write too.

GP: In Female Furies #2, you had this big character beat where Big Barda is a victim blamer. Why did you decide to make her a victim blamer?

CC: Because I think what happens sometimes is that it’s so impossible for people to believe that something has happened. I think that it’s human tendency to keep the status quo because if you actually awaken to what’s really happening, too many things have to change, and it’s very difficult. Your whole world has to change. Not just society, but your whole personal world.

I think it’s easier for people, and Barda falls victim to that because it’s quite common. You look at women who are raped or domestically abused, or men. They’re usually blamed for what happened. It’s a cycle. I wanted to mirror that to make us look at ourselves, and how we deal with people when they’re telling us the truth. That’s why there’s that thing, “Believe women.” When someone tells you something has happened, it costs them so much to speak. We still have that lesson to learn over and over.

GP: Especially in issue 2, the visuals of the sexual assaults are very explicit. How do you do these kind of scenes without being overly gratuitous like some previous comics put out about this topic?

CC: I have to give a shout out to Adriana Melo. I think that Adriana does such an amazing job of handling those brutal moments with a tenderness and a care toward what’s happening to the characters. I think a lot of that has to do with our collaboration and her masterful way of doing that. I think that’s one of the hard things. Nothing that I or Adriana put in there is gratuitous. I’m not doing it willy nilly. It’s not to be titillating in any way. It’s to talk about harsh circumstances.

Also, they’re all terrible people. They’re villains. Even the people being abused are terrible people. It’s tough to write. It’s not an easy thing.

GP: Granny Goodness is the first protagonist you focus on in Female Furies. In previous stories, she’s been this caricature of evil like when Ed Asner voiced her in the DC cartoons. How do you make her sympathetic?

CC: The Female Furies have always been a part of Kirby’s Fourth World, and they’ve been on the fringe or on the side. You know that they’re all complex. When you take a sliver of the story, and you say, “I’m gonna tell this story of an awakening.” Then, you have more time to explore of how people got there.

I think that you can’t have someone like Granny Goodness without knowing that she came from somewhere. The way that she is is because she learned she had to be like that. I was really interested in figuring out how to crack that. Who is she, and how did she become such a terrible person?

GP: Your take on Darkseid is so unique. I’m used to him being a total nihilist. How do you make him go from being all about “Anti-Life” to a sexual assaulting CEO?

CC: First of all, I think that a lot of men in power express their power in many different ways, and to me, that seemed very natural. It also seemed to me that he would have a very particular relationship with Granny because she is the only woman. I think that he know that she’s probably just as powerful if not more powerful than he is. He needs to keep her under his thumb.

I looked to the history of man and womankind and sort of plucked from there. I think it’s obvious that Darkseid would have those kind of power moves.

GP: It reminds me a lot of Zeus in Greek mythology.

CC: Absolutely. You wouldn’t be like “Zeus doesn’t do it”. He did it a million ways. That’s also how he kept power. I think that Darkseid is a very smart man, and he knows how to manipulate people.


Female Furies #3 goes on sale, April 3, 2019.

Follow Cecil Castellucci on Twitter

C2E2 2019: The Cosplayers and Clueless Panel

When I entered C2E2 (early for once) on Satuday, I was greeted by a dancing Mr. Fantastic and a Swamp Thing chilling out with a John Constantine (Sadly no Alan Moore.) and knew that 2019 would be yet another great year for cosplay at this convention. The Academy Award winning Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse seemed to have a huge influence on this year’s cosplayers with lots of dads aka Peter B. Parkers, Miles Moraleses, Spider-Gwens, and Spider-Man Noirs walking around. Without further ado, here are some the cosplayers and cool booths from C2E2 this year.

At C2E2, I also had the opportunity to attend the Clueless reunion panel that featured a capacity crowd and appearances by Breckin Meyer (Travis), Donald Faison (Murray), Alicia Silverstone (Cher Horowitz herself), and Paul Rudd (Josh), who made a big entrance and bragged about having all the spoilers to Avengers: Endgame. Here are some pictures from this panel. It was a showcase for Meyer’s wit and hijinks as he got down on one knee and proposed to Faison, Rudd’s enthusiasm as he geeked out about Tim and Eric and Depeche Mode, and an opportunity for Silverstone to relive how much work she put into being in almost every scene of Clueless and her appreciation for Emma, the Jane Austen novel that inspired it.

Tini Howard is Now Exclusive with Marvel

Announced at the “Women of Marvel” panel at C2E2, Tini Howard has signed an exclusive agreement with Marvel.

Howard is writing the current Age Of Conan: Belit, Queen Of The Black Coast limited series, the Thanos six-issue series beginning in April, and also has a story in June’s Guardians of the Galaxy Annual #1. She will also be writing the new Death’s Head series teaming up with artist Kei Zama.

She made her Marvel debut with September’s Captain America Annual #1. You can hear her talk with us on Graphic Policy Radio.

Howard broke in to comics with 2014’s Magdalena: Seventh Sacrament after winning Top Cow’s talent hunt. She also current writes Glow from IDW, The Forgotten Queen for Valiant, and Euthanauts for IDW’s Black Crown imprint.

Man Arrested for Comic Theft at C2E2

Stephen Bowles, 51, of Remington, Indiana was charged with three felony accounts of theft in related to rare comic books take at this past weekend’s Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo (C2E2).

Bowles is accused of stealing over $9,000 in comics from three vendors. He was ordered held on $10,000 bail and being held at a Cook County Jail until he can post a $1,000 bond.

A vendor alerted Chicago police and Bowles was arrested. He was found with some of the reported stolen comics. He is alledged to have taken $4,500 worth of comics from one vendor, $3,500 from another, and a third for $1,200.

Bowles admitted to the theft after being arrested.

Lion Forge Heads to C2E2 with Signings and Panels

Lion Forge is heading to C2E2 and you’ll find them at booth #317 for multiple signings throughout the show, including the creative team behind the recently release graphic novel, GLINT!

Friday, March 22
11AM – 12PM: Sam Sattin & Ian McGinty (GLINT)
1PM – 2PM: Gene Ha (Mae)
5PM – 6PM:  Sam Sattin & Ian McGinty (GLINT)

Representation in Graphic Storytelling: From the Comic Shop to the Tabletop

Date: Fri, Mar 22, 2019
Time: 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Location: S403

Lion Forge Comics strives to publish comics and more that anyone, regardless of background, ethnicity or gender identification can connect with. With multiple imprints, including an entire line of books for younger readers, and one of the most diverse superhero universes in comics history, the St. Louis publisher makes good on that promise every Wednesday. Join Lion Forge’s Devin Funches and Christina “Steenz” Stewart, along with writer Amy Chu (Summit), artist Gene Ha (Mae), Ben FisherEmily Whitten, and Michelle Nguyen, the team behind The Underfoot, as well asSamuel Sattin and Ian McGinty (GLINT), for a look at how Lion Forge truly publishes “comics for everyone.”

Saturday, March 23
12PM – 1PM: Sam Sattin & Ian McGinty (GLINT)
2PM – 3PM: Gene Ha (Mae)
4PM – 5PM: Sam Sattin & Ian McGinty (GLINT)
6PM – 7PM: Amy Chu (Summit)

Sunday, March 24
11AM – 12PM: Sam Sattin & Ian McGinty (GLINT)
12PM–1PM: Amy Chu (Summit)
2PM – 3PM: Sam Sattin & Ian McGinty (GLINT)

And on the C2E2 SyFy Wire Live Stage:

Friday: Gene Ha–11:30 – 12:30PM Interview & Live Drawing
Friday: Sam Sattin and Ian McGinty–1:45 – 2PM
Saturday: Ben Fisher, Emily Whitten, and Michelle Nguyen–11:00 – 11:15AM

VIZ Media Details Activities & Guests for C2E2

VIZ Media heads to Chicago’s premier pop culture and comics convention, Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo for panels, signing sessions, and more. C2E2 2019 takes place March 22nd – 24th in the South Building at McCormick Place in downtown Chicago.

VIZ Media celebrates all things Boruto at this year’s C2E2. Boruto: Naruto Next Generations voice actors Robbie Daymond (Mitsuki) and Cherami Leigh (Sarada) will participate on the VIZ Media and SHONEN JUMP panels, autograph sessions, and a livestreamed interview on C2E2’s Live Stage.

Friday, March 22nd

1:30pm Official VIZ Media Panel
Panel Room S404

Join VIZ Media as we share thrilling tales of upcoming releases and other exciting announcements from North America’s largest distributor of manga and anime! Special BORUTO voice cast guests Robbie Daymond (Mitsuki) and Cherami Leigh (Sarada) will also stop by so don’t miss out!

2:45pm BORUTO Voice Cast Signing
Autographing Table 39

In celebration of the upcoming home video release of BORUTO: NARUTO NEXT GENERATIONS, Robbie Daymond (Mitsuki) and Cherami Leigh (Saradawill be autographing free limited edition posters for fans of the show. 

Saturday, March 23rd

2:45pm Official SHONEN JUMP Panel Featuring BORUTO
Panel Room S401

Come hang out with us and BORUTO voice talent Robbie Daymond (Mitsuki) and Cherami Leigh (Sarada)! We’ll be making announcements and discussing SHONEN JUMP manga and anime. There may be a fun game or two and a chance for you to join in for very cool prizes. Don’t miss it! 

4:15pm BORUTO Voice Cast Signing
Autographing Table 39

A special encore autograph session with Robbie Daymond and Cherami Leigh. Attendees will receive afree autographed limited edition poster. Stop by!

6:30pm BORUTO Voice Cast Interview
SyFy Wire Live Stage

Head to C2E2’s Live Stage for a special livestreamed interview with BORUTO voice cast members Robbie Daymond and Cherami Leigh.

Diamond Select Toys is Bringing Prototypes and a Panel to C2E2!

Diamond Select Toys, currently celebrating its 20th birthday, is returning once more to Chicago to participate in C2E2, the Chicago Comics and Entertainment Expo! From Friday, March 22 through Sunday March 24th, DST will be selling some of their latest releases at Booth 807, showing off upcoming products and even hosting a panel!

DST will bring their full library of in-development prototypes to the show, including items that were seen for the first time at NY Toy Fair in February, and some that have never been seen at all! Marvel, DC, Kingdom Hearts, John Wick, Bruce Lee, Godzilla, Iron Giant, Predator, Castlevania, Westworld, Sonic the Hedgehog and more will be on display, as well as items from Gentle Giant Ltd., so come by the booth to plan out your year of collecting!

And on Friday, at 1:45 PM, DST will host “Diamond Select Toys: The Best of All Worlds” in room S403. Marketing Supervisor Zach Oat and prototype painter Jeff Stephens will discuss upcoming products, engage in a Q&A and give out some door prizes!

Action Lab: Danger Zone Exclusive For C2E2 2019

Action Lab Entertainment will be at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo this week! Stop by Booth #416 to get some comic books from Action Lab. Also get exclusive covers, both regular and risqué, for Zombie Tramp #58!

ZOMBIE TRAMP #58

Writer(s): Dan Mendoza, Vince Hernandez 
Artist Name: Marco Maccagni
Cover Artist: Dan Mendoza 
Limited to 100 regular and 100 risquécopies!

The origin of the new Zombie Tramp unfolds with chaos as Angel awakens in her new form… rabid and angry as hell! This limited edition C2E2 cover is an alternate Dan Mendoza cover.

24 pgs./ M / FC

ZOMBIE TRAMP #58 C2E2 variant
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