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Preview: Godzilla: Rage Across Time

Godzilla: Rage Across Time

Various (w) • Various (a) • Bob Eggleton (c)

Move over dinosaurs… monsters used to rule the planet! Travel to different time periods to examine the origin of myths that fueled nightmares! Feudal Japan, ancient Greece, medieval England, classic Rome, and The Cretaceous by a multitude of today’s best creators! Includes work by Ulises Farinas, Erick Freitas, Chris Mowry, Ryan Ferrier, Matt Frank, Tadd Galusha, Jeff Zornow, and more!

FC • 120 Pages •  $19.99

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Preview: Godzilla: Rage Across Time #5 (of 5)

Godzilla: Rage Across Time #5 (of 5)

Jay Fotos (w) • Jeff Zornow (a) Bob Eggleton (c)

Travel back to the age of monsters to discover the secret origins of the monsters! The mysterious circumstances behind their arrival may spell doom for mankind in the present!

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

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Preview: Godzilla: Rage Across Time #4 (of 5)

Godzilla: Rage Across Time #4 (of 5)

Ulises Farinas, Erik Freitas (w) • Pablo Tunica (a) Bob Eggleton (c)

Hannibal makes his daring assault on Rome, but first he must overcome an unforeseen obstacle… Godzilla! Can the classical era’s greatest terror defeat history’s mightiest monster?

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

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Preview: Godzilla: Rage Across Time #2 (of 5)

Godzilla: Rage Across Time #2 (of 5)

Chris Mowry & Kahlil Schweitzer (w) • Tadd Galusha (a) • Bob Eggleton (c)

In ancient Greece, the gods would toy with the lives of mortals as it suited their fancy. None could oppose the will of these mighty gods… until the arrival of Godzilla!

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

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Preview: Godzilla: Rage Across Time #1 (of 5)

Godzilla: Rage Across Time #1 (of 5)

Jeremy Robinson & Matt Frank (w) • Matt Frank (a) • Bob Eggleton (c)

Move over dinosaurs… monsters used to rule the planet! Travel to different time periods to examine the origin of myths that fueled nightmares! In this first installment, Godzilla brings his terror to feudal Japan!

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

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WonderCon 2016: American Gothic Press’ Announcements

At their first ever WonderCon panel, American Gothic Press took the stage and talked about their first year they’ve had with titles like Gunsuits, Broken Moon, Project Nemesis, Monster World, and the more recent success in Irwin Allen’s Lost in Space: The Lost Adventures.

The discussion then focused on the upcoming action title Killbox, with writer Tom Riordan and artist Nathan Gooden on hand to talk about the process and the decision to keep the comic in black and white. They revealed the cover of the upcoming third issue (see below). The comic drops April 20, 2016.

KILLBOX

After Killbox, the conversation switched to Lost in Space, with discussion of both the current story arc “The Curious Galactics” and the upcoming “Malice in Wonderland” (LOST IN SPACE #4-6). It was announced that colorist and cover artist Patrick McEvoy will be taking over art duties for the second arc.

Lost in Space

The discussion then focused on the upcoming Tales From the Ackermansion Kickstarter launching in May. To celebrate Forrest J Ackerman’s 100th birthday later this year, Famous Monsters of Filmland is putting together a graphic anthology to honor their founder. The list of contributors so far includes Kirk Hammett, Ray Fawkes, John 5, Richard Christian Matheson, Dan DiDio, Matt Frank, Christian DiBari, Charlie Benante, Juan Ferreyra, Darick Robertson, Bob Eggleton, Ben Meares, David Weiner, Holly Interlandi, Joe Moe, Adam Egypt Mortimer, Travis Williams, Dave Kelly, Trevor Goring, Buzz Dixon, Mark L. Miller, Jim Terry, Jonathan La Mantia, Lara Antal, Victoria Lau, and Patrick McEvoy.

TALES FROM THE ACKERMANSION

Looking towards the future, the cover for Island 731 by Jeremy Robinson and Kane Gilmour was debuted, illustrated by Jeff Zornow. The first issue solicits in May 2016.

ISLAND 731

Gunsuits will return later this year with Gunsuits: Alix, a one-shot with Philip Kim, Holly Interlandi, and Dennis Calero as the creative team.

GUNSUITS

Finally, it was announced that Broken Moon will also be returning, with Nat Jones returning on art duties. The cover was shown, featuring a sinister looking Gill-Creature.

BROKEN MOON

Preview: Project Nemesis #4

PROJECT NEMESIS #4

by Jeremy Robinson and Matt Frank with incentive covers by Bob Eggleton

Investigation leads to Hudson and Collins learning of Nemesis’ origin: Maigo Tilly, a murdered young girl whose history might give clues to where Nemesis will strike next. As the evidence mounts, the monster takes to the ocean—and Beverly Harbor, Hudson’s own stomping ground!

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Review: Godzilla in Hell TPB

3071489Growing up I used to consume everything pop culture as if they were going out of style. I remember coming home after school, to watch Black Belt Theatre, where I would find out about the different types of Kung-Fu and we decried the Japanese as evil, to the Chinese, thanks to Bruce Lee’s Fists of Fury. I remember my opinion changing once I started to watch samurai movies and Kaiju movies. Especially Kaiju movies, the one where Godzilla battled every monster imagined.

At first, when I did watch the movies I wondered why the Japanese military couldn’t defeat any of the kaiju as they wreaked havoc throughout the cities knocking down buildings at will, and with humans narrowly escaping death. Then the movies has us rooting for Godzilla to defeat the other kaiju and it would not belong before they started to make the movies seem more like a franchise then standalone movies.AS I dare anyone to remember the silly but fun movie, Son of Godzilla. Eventually they would pit him against King Kong, which where the movies really got interesting.

IDW has decidedly wanted to continue Godzilla’s adventures in a way that he had not been tested before. The Kaiju has entered the Underworld, as he faces his own “game of death’, in Hell. He reacts to each challenge much like how he did in the movies. By story’s end, you have a battle tested kaiju , one who has faced a 1,000 battles, and one whose victory was earned.

Overall, an interesting story, which could have been pedestrian in lesser hands, but comes off much like Milton’sParadise Lost, but with Kaiju. The story by James Stokoe, delivers in spades, a killer story. The art by the various illustrators, makes each issue collected a true treat. Altogether, a fun story, that should not be underestimated, as simple smash and grab, but definitely is on the level Vaughn’s Pride of Babylon.

Story: James Stokoe Art: Bob Eggleton, Buster Moody, Ibrahim Moustafa, Dave Wachter
Story: 9.4 Art: 9.2 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

IDW Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

American Gothic Press Joins Local Comic Shop Day

American Gothic Press is partnering with ComicsPRO for the first annual Local Comic Shop Day. The event, scheduled for November 28, 2015 at participating stores, has been publicized by ComicsPRO as a way to celebrate and appreciate independent comic shops for their donations to pop culture. Many publishers, including Marvel, BOOM!, Image, Oni, Black Mask, IDW, and Archie will be providing exclusive items for shops participating in the event.

American Gothic Press has created an exclusive Local Comic Shop Day cover by Jorge Marrero and Jenn Pham for Project Nemesis #2, depicting the kaiju Nemesis crushing a helicopter in all her sinister glory.

Project Nemesis is a six-issue adaptation of the bestselling novel by Jeremy Robinson, with art by Matt Frank and incentive covers by Bob Eggleton. The story tells of a government experiment in Maine gone horribly wrong that gives rise to a massive monster, Nemesis, who proceeds to terrorize New England. Issue #2 picks up the cliffhanger from the series debut and brings even more intensity to Jon Hudson and Ashley Collins’ hunt for whatever is killing scores of people on the East Coast.

Final order cutoff for Local Comic Shop Day exclusives is October 12, 2015.

Project Nemesis #1 will be available in stores and on Comixology on October 7, 2015.

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Review: Godzilla in Hell #2

'Hell is other kaiju'. - 50-foot tall radioactive SartreThere’s something really entertaining about properties whose titles describe them perfectly. Snakes on a Plane, Alien vs Predator, Santa Claus Conquers the Martians…if you know the 90s-era British phrase ‘does exactly what it says on the tin’, these titles are the perfect embodiment of that saying. What you see is what you get – the description sums up everything you need to know. Godzilla, King of the Monsters, has found himself in Hell (the actual, real hell, complete with a swirling cloud of lost souls that threatened to overwhelm him in issue #1) and is wandering the abyss, trying to find a way out.

The thing about comics is that as a medium, you can get away with just about anything as long as you sell it convincingly. Batman being shot with a time-traveling bullet that sends him back to prehistoric times, Superboy punching the walls of reality itself, Deadpool’s fourth wall breaks: if you really sell it, you can do anything you want. So Godzilla ending up in Hell, while causing some serious confusion to me as a lifelong Godzilla fangirl, is a concept I’m capable of rolling with as long as the writers make it work.

And do they ever. The first issue of Godzilla in Hell was interesting in how experimental it felt: with no speaking characters at all and no narration, all we saw was wordless panels as Godzilla tried to get his bearings and did battle with some monsters that would have fit right in on the set of John Carpenter’s The Thing. 

Where the first issue felt looser due to the more cartoony art style, the disorienting imagery of Hell and its denizens, and the lack of explanation as to what was happening and why, issue two feels more like an adaptation of some ancient fable. The narration is going for the sort of gravitas and solemnity you expect to hear from a voiceover at the beginning of a blockbuster fantasy film, and the art… wow.

So here’s the main thing that caught me about this issue: while Bob Eggleton‘s writing is strong, and moves the comic in a much more clear narrative direction than James Stokoe‘s wordless panels in issue #1, Bob’s art is phenomenal and lends the proceedings an almost Biblical feel. This is the recounting of an epic from generations ago, a story told by a wizened priest to awestruck students. Every page and panel of issue #2 is an actual painting by Bob, and it pairs with the narration to make something that I initially thought of as very silly feel serious and intense. In this issue Godzilla faces some of his classic foes, either demon-possesed or being impersonated by demons, and then – as the narration tells us – he runs into the reason he’s been brought to hell in the first place: his old nemesis King Ghidorah.

We’re only on issue #2 and we have a basic idea of why Godzilla is in Hell now, and we’ve seen his mortal foe either masterminding this whole thing or being used as a pawn in some greater scheme. We’ll probably have to wait a few more issues to get all the details, but I will definitely be there. Issue #2 of Godzilla in Hell ups the ante considerably, with a major upgrade to issue #1’s excellent art and a tighter plot now that there’s an unseen narrator setting the stage. I do still have my concerns that this is going to end up being all a dream or something equally frustrating and I always find myself wishing for more because these issues seem to end way too quickly for my tastes, but seeing Godzilla fight his way through Hell the way he’s already dominated planet Earth is incredibly fun, and the paintings that show us three amazing kaiju fights through one fast-paced issue are more than worth the price of admission. If you love Godzilla, you’re probably already finished reading your copy of this comic book, and if you aren’t or only have a vague interest in kaiju, you still owe it to yourself to check this comic out.

Story: Bob Eggleton Art: Bob Eggleton
Story: 7 Art: 10 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

IDW provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review. Daphne bought her own copy anyway.

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