Tag Archives: behemoth

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ComiXology Has You Covered with Today’s New Digital Releases from Marvel, IDW, Image, AfterShock, and More!

Heroes Reborn #1

It’s new comic book day and comiXology has you covered with all of the new releases today. You can get shopping now or check out the individual releases below.

A Wave Blue World

AAM-Markosia

AfterShock

Antarctic Press

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

Behemoth

BOOM! Studios

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Kodansha

la Boîte à Bulles

Marvel

Oni Press

Papercutz

Tidalwave Productions

Titan Comics

Vault Comics

Zenescope


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Today’s New Digital Releases Features Over 80 New C0mics from DC, Yen Press, VIZ Media, Kodansha, and more!

Batman #108

Today is one of two new comic book days and comiXology has you digital comic needs covered. Check out the individual releases below by the publisher or get shopping now!

Abrams Comicarts

Behemoth

comiXology Submit

DC Comics

Fantagraphics

Harlequin

HarperCollins

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Kodansha

Marvel

Scholastic Graphix

Seven Seas

Vertical

VIZ Media

Yen Press


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You Promised Me Darkness #1 Sells Over 55,000 Copies and MFKZ #1 is expected over 40,000 Copies

Behemoth is seeing a lot of success with their debuts having multiple sell outs due to high demand.

The publisher has announced that You Promised Me Darkness #1 has sold over 55,000 copies and now is on its third printing. The series marked Damian Connelly’s first comic book release in the United States and his first he took up art duties on in over ten years due to a broken wrist that sidelined him for the decade. The series is currently being shopped for a Film/TV deal with numerous inquiries being placed for the theatrical rights.

MFKZ #1 looks to also be a hit as Behemoth has announced that its first printing will cross 40,000 copies. The title was initially released in France by Ankama as Mutafuckaz and was adapted into a 2017 film that is available for streaming on Netflix. The film features talent like Giancarlo Esposito, Danny Trejo, RZA, Vince Staples, among others. The oversized 54-page first issue releases in shops on June 23, 2021.

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 04/24/2021

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

SWORD #5 (Marvel)– Untethered from King in Black, Al Ewing and Valerio Schiti are free to explore mutant space politics in SWORD #5 with the Snarkwar (a war of succession for the Zn’rx aliens) sharing time with a buck naked Fabian Cortez trying to make murder legal in front of the Small Council. Cortez’s testimony is a masterclass in how power structures keep being devious and unethical, but don’t say the quiet part (For example, wars are for resources not just causes.) out loud. In a hilarious juxtaposition between his nudity and his far-from-subtle sentiments, Cortez calls humans “flatscans” and says their existence is a living death while trying to legalize the original crime. Ewing’s dialogue is delicious, but Cortez’s buffoonery is really driven by Schiti’s art like when he whines about only getting $100,000 and some real estate in Florida from his colonizer scion parents in front of Storm and Magneto, who is a Holocaust survivor and rocking his old school red costume courtesy of colorist Marte Gracia. The space stuff with the Snarkwar is less engaging, but Schiti draws some gorgeous vistas and bursts of violence. These scenes show that Cortez is expendable and also act as connective tissue between cosmic and mutant Marvel. (I gotta go back and read Al Ewing’s Guardians of the Galaxy.) Overall: 8.4 Verdict: Buy

Nightwing #79 (DC)– Tom Taylor, Bruno Redondo, and Adriano Lucas provide that good home cooking in Nightwing #79 with a wonderful blend of high wire action, humor, and socioeconomic commentary. Given a huge windfall from Alfred’s estate, Dick Grayson struggles in a direction to focus his wealth, but he realizes that he can basically be a social safety net for Bludhaven. Sure, some of the wording and connection to his past as a circus acrobat is a little cheesy, but Taylor and Redondo are positioning Nightwing as a socially aware superhero. He cares more about ending the stranglehold of the corrupt Maroni crime family than some kids stealing his wallet while he was buying pizza for the neighborhood. And that’s not all that’s great about Nightwing as Tom Taylor writes fun, warm-hearted banter between Dick and Barbara Gordon, and Bruno Redondo’s layouts capture the athleticism of his fighting style with freeze frames and other tricks that capture non-stop motion across a spread. Throw in some glorious pinks and blues from Lucas and some fun Easter Eggs, and you’ve got a comic that is both a love letter to Nightwing’s past and sets him up as a true hero of now. Overall: 9.2 Verdict: Buy

Alice in Leatherland #1 (Black Mask)– Fairy tale and BDSM tropes collide in Iolanda Zanferdino and Elisa Romboli’s sweet, slice of life comic Alice in Leatherland. The titular Alice just wants to live a nice, quiet life and write children’s books in her small California town, but after her girlfriend cheats on her, she decides to move to San Francisco with her friend Robin. The rest of the comic is all about the drama of finding a place to live, especially in one of the most expensive cities in the world. Romboli’s art is adorable and hilarious, and there are a lot of silent sequences that capture Alice’s state of mind at any given period. I’m really excited to go down this leather daddy-meets performance art-meets cute fairy tale rabbit hole with her in upcoming issues. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #2 (Oni Press)– Chris Samnee, Laura Samnee, and Matthew Wilson go for the heart strings in Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #2 with plenty of flashbacks of the sisters Rainbow and Jonna in the before times. Wilson’s palette is lush and verdant compared to the current drab, post-apocalyptic world even though there are pops of colors every time a giant monster shows up. In very few words and mainly using body language, the Samnees show how Rainbow and Jonna have grown apart over the past year. This comic continue to be a masterpiece of visual storytelling with all kinds of great little touches like Crank!’s sound effects and Samnee’s facial expressions for Rainbow alone conveying a monster battle. It’s all about finding love and belonging at the end of the world, and I look forward to finding more about how the apocalypse happened. Overall: 9.0 Verdict: Buy

The Many Deaths of Laila Starr #1 (BOOM!)– Another hit from Ram V as he and artist Filipe Andrade go into Vertigo mode in a story where the god of Death gets fired and put in the body of a dead girl in Mumbai. Despite the dark subject matter and tragedy of it all, V has a sly, Pratchett-esque sense of humor that especially stands out when Death’s boss is talking about how eternal life is leading to good ol’ “corporate restructuring”. This sets up a conflict between death and immortality, but Laila Starr #1 chooses the human over the epic and meditates on these things in hospital rooms with regular, every day people. Then, Ram V adds a bit of a twist, and the stories off to the races. Filipe Andrade’s scratchy inks and vivid colors capture the flaws in all-powerful beings and the beauty in mortals. This is a clever series and continues to show that V isn’t afraid to tackle the big questions while telling fun genre stories. Overall: 9.2 Verdict: Buy

Ultramega #2 (Image)– The second installment of Ultramega is much different than the previous with James Harren exploring life after the death of the Ultramega when his blood flowed in the street. A prologue with gorgeous colors from Dave Stewart alludes at hope for another host of this force and is pure tokusatsu goodness, but the rest of the issue is really a drag. Noah takes up his dad’s mantle by fighting Kaiju Klan members with remote control Ultramega drones, but this ends up bringing more harm than good. Things continue to get worse and worse as Harren’s art becomes more bleak even if there is less large scale destruction than Ultramega #1. This series still isn’t a runaway hit for me and has a fridging problem, but James Harren and Stewart’s visuals are big and propulsive showing the real impact of kaijus and Ultramegas on the landscape and ordinary people. Overall: 7.6 Verdict: Read

Eternals #4 (Marvel)– Yeah, a superhero/cosmic being murder mystery is overdone at this point, but it’s really just Kieron Gillen, Esad Ribic, and Matthew Wilson’s Trojan Horse to get readers to learn more about the Eternals’ personalities and relationships. Although there are some sidebars featuring Sersi and Phastos as well as Ikaris protecting his human charge, the focal point is Kingo and Thena interrogating Druig, who has just become the next in line to be ruler of the Eternal city of Polaria. Flashbacks show how these beings manipulate human history from the sidelines, and Ribic’s take on the Mongol conquest is suitably epic. There’s really a majestic quality to his art that comes out in both conversation and fight scenes. Gillen’s humor in his script continues to be a delight and flesh out characters I was unfamiliar with. Eternals is my new cosmic soap opera, for sure. Overall: 8.2 Verdict: Buy

Women Of Marvel #1 (Marvel)– This anthology kicks off with a hilarious one pager from Mariko Tamaki and Peach Momoko about Lady Deathstrike getting manicure followed by a thrilling Peggy Carter as Captain America story from Elsa Sjunneson and Naomi Franquiz where she teams up with a Black, disabled spy named Lilliane to kick Nazi ass. Tamaki returns with Nina Vakueva, Rachel Stott, June Brighman, and Marika Cresta for some funny slice of life one pagers where Emma Frost uses her telepathy to make cut-offs and a tee look like her White Queen get-up, Medusa multitasks with her hair, Jean Grey starts to care for a succulent, and Hela struggles with insomnia. Next is a Natasha Alterici/Joanna Estep story where Mystique acts motherly and sabotages a young Rogue’s field trip to get her to join the Brotherhood while dealing with Stegron and reanimated dinosaurs. Anne Toole and Kei Zama tell a Misty Knight story where she helps the daughter of a technopathic find a new start with richly detailed art and a fun cameo for readers of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Captain America. After that, Nadia Shammas and Skylar Partridge tell a damn near perfect She-Hulk story that involves being lost in the Natural History Museum, a big brawl against the Rhino, and some legal humor. I really miss She-Hulk being written that way. Sophie Campbell and Eleonora Carlini craft a Marrow and Feral story with manga-style battles even though they eventually bond over being fellow outsiders in Krakoa. Finally, the anthology goes out on a high note with a hilarious Bachelor parody from Zoraida Cordova and Maria Frohlich as Gamora goes undercover to take down an extraterrestrial trafficker with Rocket feeding her lines on the other end. Women of Marvel #1 is a true showcase of female comics talent, and I loved seeing the different sides of character whether through the Tamaki one-pagers or more substantial stories. Overall: 9.3 Verdict: Buy

X-Force #19 (Marvel)– Quentin Quire gets some help fighting his inner demons in a horror-tinged issue of X-Force from Benjamin Percy, Garry Brown, and Guru eFX. Like its companion book Wolverine, X-Force has so many plots going on, but Percy and Brown wisely focus on Quentin Quire hunting down his evil doppelganger that is trying to take his flesh DNA with the help of Jean Grey, Domino, and Phoebe Cuckoo. As fellow omega mutant telepaths, Jean and Quentin have had similar life experiences, and she trains him in some new techniques like seeing each mind as a door and opens up about how this has burned her in the past. (The Scott/Emma affair). X-Force #19 is like a slasher flick with a pink color palette from Guru eFX. The bad guy, Xeno (I think), is pretty boring, but Brown’s art and the unique interactions between Quentin and Jean kept me interested and X-Force on my books to check out. Overall: 7.4 Verdict: Read.

Brett

Children of the Atom #2 (Marvel) – There’s something fun and charming about the series. The issue ties in nicely with the Outlawed storyline that Marvel hasn’t really taken advantage of. There’s also some intriguing debate about mutants and the law outside of Krakoa. The issue shows off the potential of the series and is just a lot of fun. Overall Rating: 7.75 Recommendation: Buy

Radiant Black #3 (Image Comics) – The series hasn’t really clicked for me so far, but this issue is bringing me around. The inclusion of Nathan’s story and focusing more on him trying to get his life together brings a bit of a grounded aspect to the character and also we finally get a glimpse of him trying to do some good with his powers. The art too feels like a step up with some really solid page layouts and one moment that feels a bit “positive”, a nice change from the often times downer the series has been. This feels like the real start to everything. Overall Rating: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Way of X #1 (Marvel) – I’ve been generally down on the current X-Men line as they’ve crossed from true “heroes” to having a lot of problematic areas. Way of X feels like it’s addressing some of my misgivings with a series focused on Nightcrawler who has become a skeptic to the mutant nation’s promises. It’s a key addition to the line that admits not all is right and some of what is presented is downright bad. The art too delivers some great visuals that play off of what Nightcrawler has issues with, emphasizing his doubt. Overall Rating: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

You Promised Me Darkness #1 (Behemoth) – A comet gives people powers and this is the story of the being who is murdering to suck that power up and making it its own. The story has a lot of potential but its presentation is odd in both narrative and art. The comic is dark, really dark, which at times makes it difficult to make out what’s going on with its black and white art. The story too is mostly voice over narrative up until the last few pages making it feel a little clunky. It stretches the set-up out a bit too much and doesn’t get to the point quick enough. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read.


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Behemoth’s New Monster

Steve Ekstrom

A little bit of full disclosure to start: I’ve known Steve Ekstrom for years. He served with me on the Best Shots team at Newsarama, and wrote for my ShotgunReviews.com. I joined him when he spearheaded the Imminent Press Kickstarter for Terminal. He lettered part of Sparkshooter. In a way, that makes me an ideal interviewer rather than a conflicted one, because I know where the bodies are buried; I helped bury some myself. But now, Steve, who has worked in and around comics for years, is back with a new title, a new job, and a new mission. He’s the new Editorial Director for up-and-coming publisher Behemoth Comics. And like that name might imply, there’s here to do some damage.

Graphic Policy: Some people might remember you writing for Newsarama many moons ago. I’ve talked to a lot of other people about this, so here goes: in what way was working in comics journalism a help, and in what ways was it a hindrance, when it came to breaking into comics? Would you do that differently now?

Steve Ekstrom: Wow, big guns first, I still like the cut of your journalistic jib after all this years, my friend.

I think being a journalist in comics for nearly a decade taught me a lot of valuable lessons in professionalism like “Don’t go into business for yourself while you’re working on projects for other people or publishers” or “This is the proper decorum for interacting with established creators” or “Try not to ruin your own career by writing really negative reviews full of hyperbole that attack the creators ability to make a paycheck.”

Those are all lessons I had to learn through experience. I feel like a cat that’s missing three or four lives now but I’m still out here trying to tell stories and make comics. [laughs]

I will admit that journalism did open doors for me in that it gave me a degree of notoriety and the ability to guarantee smaller publishers at least one interview to cover their content because, contrary to popular belief, most major websites do NOT adequately cover lesser-known indie creators who are just starting out. It’s an unfortunate byproduct of needing all your articles to drive clicks and/ or the need to be first with major news items for trending moments on social media.

In terms of doing things differently, I would have played less World of Warcraft when I was still just starting out. I would have tried to save more money to pay professionals to get things done faster. I was very fortunate to get to work with artists and colorists who were starting out just like me and we were all hungry and working for free. We needed small amounts of content to create a body of work to show competency so that’s what we did. Did I offer to pay in exposure? Sure, a little bit. If you’re just starting out and you put the right squad together magic can happen.

Graphic Policy: I think that Matt Brady is an underappreciated figure in comics in the 2000s. What impact did he have on you?

Steve Ekstrom: Let’s be honest here: You gave me my first invite to the party. You saw that I had some writing talent on MySpace of all places way back in the middle of 2006. You offered me a spot in the Best Shots squad. I didn’t even KNOW how big Newsarama was until I spoke to my old college friend, Adam Tracey, who was the Managing Editor of Toyfare Magazine at the time.

Matt Brady gave me my first paycheck as a journalist in the comics industry. He gave me the confidence to be the work horse I wanted to become in my first year at Newsarama and he let me earn my spot. I will always be forever indebted to the two of you.

In all seriousness, I want to see Matt write a Power of the Atom book at DC. He pitched it to me one time when we were heading to a mixer for DC Comics in San Diego and it was glorious. I’ve also had the pleasure of editing some of Matt’s work a couple of years ago; he’s incredibly talented.

Make some more damn pamphlets, Matt.

Graphic Policy: Tell us about your experience with DC’s old ZUDA program.

Steve Ekstrom: It was eye-opening to say the least. I learned so much about actually “making” comics in that time period. The 4:3 format was unique and frustrating because it changed the way you tackled a page and the “grid”.

I also learned a lot about marketing a project for a competition. So much hustling is needed! It was kind of the same sort of month long sprint you make with a crowd-sourcing campaign. This was also way back before everyone and their mother was online every single day for 12 hours a day on their phones. And I totally sucked at Twitter back then…and, well, I still do.

Mostly, I learned a valuable lesson regarding “word economy” in sequential storytelling. I shoehorned a ton of information into our 8 page submission thinking, “Oh, yeah, if they can get past the heavy lifting in the intro, they’ll get action-packed explosions and wrestling with albino crocodiles in the next 8 page segment.” Not so much. We came in third for the month with over 60,000 views for “The Ares Imperative”. [laughs]

Graphic Policy: You’ve been on the positive and the negative side of crowdfunding experiences. What did you learn from both outcomes? And what do you think of the ways the crowdfunding is being used today?

Steve Ekstrom: I know that I’ve failed more than I’ve succeeded but that’s just part of the process. You’re not living your life if you’re not failing upward at times.

Truthfully, there’s a lot of nuance to it. Knowing which month to campaign or which extras to add or how to get estimates on everything connected to your funding goals and still hitting a reasonable over-funded benchmark for the project you’re presenting. All of it. It’s a LOT. The goal also has to make sense in regard to what you’re offering. I totally messed up on my first Kickstarter because I had no concept of scope. We were trying to raise $20K and we didn’t even have stories in the can yet. If you’ve never tried to crowd-source a book: DON’T DO THAT. Have stuff to show potential backers.

When we funded on our second outing, I learned how to be a small publisher. I learned how to package an entire book from concept to marketing to printing and distributing it out of my house. It was absolutely exhaustive but I loved every minute of it.

I want to see crowd-sourced comics continue to flourish and I want platforms like Kickstarter to keep creating opportunities for creators to make new comics that don’t have the luxury of bigger publishers’ bank rolls. I think there are murky lines being crossed when bigger companies have the scratch to make their own books without sourcing but I also understand that crowd-sourcing is just pre-ordering with extra steps most of the time. I could talk about the merits of these sorts of scenarios all day with the right group of creators.

Graphic Policy: In addition to writing, you also developed your lettering talents and began picking up work. What motivated you to do that, and is that something you plan to continue?

Steve Ekstrom:
Honestly? I made the same mistake most eager new creators and I devalued paid letterers by trying to learn how to do it cheaply on my own thinking that it would be “easy”. I was incredibly wrong.

Looking back, I got lucky because I have a touch of OCD so I would pour myself over my lettering until it looked professional on my first published story but it was still nowhere near the perfect digital stuff done by Nate Piekos or Richard Starking. I have learned to love the craft of lettering and typography.

The most important lesson I can impart on new creators: PAY THE LETTERER. You’re going to think that lettering is the least important aspect of the book. You’re wrong. Your story is the least important, writer person. The technical aspects of the book can easily carry a shitty story. Lettering is the least important part of production when new creators are considering what’s important. However, bad lettering is the FIRST aspect of a book to take a reader out of their experience reading your project if it’s done poorly.

I’d been lettering my own projects for roughly a decade before I felt comfortable enough to charge money for my services. Now, I offer to edit as I letter and it works really well with well-conceived projects that need minor polishing. They get both services for one low rate.

Going forward, I will be lettering for my limited number of clients as well as on most of the projects I will be writing or editing because it allows me to have tighter control over the production of the overall work. Now that I’m joining up with Behemoth, I may even start lettering some of their books I’m not connected to directly. I’m not allergic to money and I love making comics professionally. Let’s make this bread!

Graphic Policy: How did you first become involved with Behemoth?

Steve Ekstrom:
Mark Bertolini approached me to letter a project called “Feeder” with artist Darryl Knickrehm. Mark worked on Terminal Pulp Anthology with me and I absolutely loved Darryl’s style when I saw his work on The Argus at Action Labs. I jumped at the opportunity to have my name on the cover of this project.

Mark introduced me to Nathan [Yocum] and we got on the phone and talked for like 3 hours. He reminds me of a much more gigantic version of my best friend, Mark. He and I just live on this crazy wavelength made out of frenetic ambition, late night taco bell runs, horror movies and content strategy regarding making comics. He’s a soul brother, for sure.

Graphic Policy: You’ve just been named Editorial Director; can you outline what that job IS and what it DOES?

Steve Ekstrom: For me, I think one of the most important things a small publisher needs is brand identity. The comic industry has a sea of hobbyists and amateur creators who want to make comics so there is a massive body of work you have to swim through to get to the surface, to be seen and sell your products.

Having a clear cut vision for the direction of the creator-owned books is important. Understanding the marketplace and what sorts of books you want representing your brand is so crucial to competing in a large marketplace that has a diminishing number of brick and mortar stores with budgets and fickle readers. We’re all fighting for the same $20 every week. And you know what I’m going to say next…

$20 is $20.

Joking aside, I bring a wealth of practical business experience as a journalist and indie creator to the table. Behemoth was just a natural fit. They approached me about having a role at the company and said, “What would you like to do?” so I told them I wanted to help them create a monolithic brand and I wanted to have my hands on as many projects as a guy with two hands and a Doc Ock harness could handle. I love this industry and I would happily spend the rest of my life making these damn pamphlets.

As for my major role, I am going to be handling a new imprint of direct-to-digital projects called D2D. We’re still relatively small as a brand so investing in up-and-coming creators is a little risky in that we have a narrow margin for error if we pick up a project that doesn’t end up selling as well to retailers as our sales forecasts project. So, we want to create a space for creators who have projects that may not be quite ready for “prime time” but still could use an opportunity for growth and experience through our digital storefront on Comixology. It’s a win-win situation when you consider the outcome.

Rising stars can have a recognizable brand on their product while they learn to market on a smaller scale with less risk of having to worry about print thresholds in a competitive marketplace. In the event that we discover a sleeper hit digitally, we can turn around and produce a print run of a project or collect a trade with minimal overhead costs.

Graphic Policy: You’ve already expressed an interest in assembling unknown talent. Can you speak on why that’s important to you?

Steve Ekstrom:
This is where I guess I should also mention I’m also going to be the editor of a direct-to-digital anthology project that we’re calling PRIMER. One of my first projects was published in an old anthology series called NEGATIVE BURN from Desperado Studios back in 2008. At the time, Negative Burn was the BEST place to find tomorrow’s creators and a lot of big names today got their first big breaks in that anthology.

I want to do the same thing with PRIMER. I know how hard it is to make comics and have them reach the right people so that you can develop yourself professionally. This is my chance to remember where I came from, to honor the people who gave me my first opportunities and to “pay it forward” by helping young creators who have the drive to persevere and the hunger to want to make polished, professional looking products. Again, it creates more opportunities for me to make comics. It doesn’t get any better than that but…

Making comics isn’t easy. Like at all.

The people who make it to the top of this industry are 1% of 1% of 1% of a body of people who all want to tell stories and all want to compete for the same five bucks. If you aren’t competitive and you aren’t constantly growing or developing your skills, you’re probably not going to get to write Spider-Man or Batman if that’s what you aim to do. Most of us have to earn that right with hard work and quantifiable sales figures. Hell, I’m still trying to get to that point in my career, too. [laughs]

All that said, there’s still going to be fairly strict submission process for D2D and PRIMER. I am going to be working with Nathan as well as our other Senior Editor, Kevin Roditeli, to iron out clear cut guidelines for our entire brand.

Graphic Policy: You’ve already worked on an anthology yourself with Terminal Pulp Anthology. What makes for a good collection, and how do you make Behemoth’s stand out?

Steve Ekstrom:
Ironically, the best advice I’ve ever heard about an anthology is this: “Your anthology can only be as good as the worst story” and, let me tell you, that advice is painfully accurate. I have spent a lot of time collecting all the popular anthologies that have come out over the past 20 years. All of them have a range of stories but the one factor that I remember seeing most? Technical proficiency.

As I said earlier, the least important part of a comic is the story and that’s coming from a guy who went to school to be a writer. It’s incredibly humbling to accept this as a truth. Good art, exceptional coloring, technically polished lettering can all elevate a mediocre story. So, yeah, be a good writer and know your craft but this entire medium is still visually based. Bring the quality with the visual elements so that those elements in turn elevate your story.

I plan to curate the line initially by privately approaching folks who are on the cusp of breaking into the big leagues. I want well-constructed shorts so I can set the bar for people who want to submit so they can, in turn, set the bar for themselves.

In 2008, I had my first submission packet put together for a project. It was drawn by a guy who was local to me, my cousin who had experience as a graphic designer helped me flat color the sample art and letter all of it with, yep, you guessed it, Comic Sans and it was atrocious. But I didn’t know any better. I had romanticized my efforts. I was ready to submit this turd straight to Image because I was “ready”.

I was working for Newsarama in San Diego at Comic-Con International and I showed my submission to CB Cebulski who was, at the time, promoting his project called “Wanderlust” at Image. He gave me the best advice of my career when he kindly didn’t rip my heart out of my chest and show it to me after looking at my atrocious submission.

He said, “Okay, I want you to look at your submission packet and look at this copy of my comic. Imagine that you had $5 and you walked into the comic shop and you saw your project sitting next to my project. Not knowing anything about either of these projects, based on your eye for quality as a fan of comics, which one of these two books would you buy based on the quality alone.”

I sat quietly for a short moment as dread built at the base of my stomach because I knew the answer instantly. I pointed at his book. He patted me on the arm and he said, “Look at the books that make it to the shelf. That’s what you’re competing against. Your project has to be as good as all of the other books that make it onto the shelves.”

It was an incredibly humbling lesson and probably the roughest one to learn first but it put me into a frame of mind where I knew I had to make every effort my best effort. I hope to impart that on others through the production of quality content.

Soko

Graphic Policy: Tell us about SOKO.

Steve Ekstrom: Soko is a really awesome police procedural/ crime project in a similar vein to that of Criminal or the movie The Departed and it is set in Serbia. I’m working on it with up-and-coming Serbian writer, Vanja Miskovic, as well as Italian artist Antonio Fuso who is on a hot streak right now with his project Wyrd being developed for television over at Dark Horse and Stargazer finishing up a healthy run at Mad Cave. We also have Antonio’s studio-mate Stefano Simeone on colors; he’s the artist for a Mega Man Fully Charged at BOOM!. We’re also sporting this ridiculously awesome cover on the first issue by one of my all-time favorites, Serbian artist, RM Guera who most folks will remember for his epic run on Scalped at Vertigo.

This book is stacked with talent. Vanja and I both are very proud of what we’ve put together and we can’t wait for it to hit shelves in the late fall.

Without giving too much away because the solicits are coming soon, Soko focuses on systemic corruption in law enforcement while exploring modern dilemmas in that region of the world that are connected to human trafficking as well as fuel smuggling.

Graphic Policy: What other Behemoth books should people be checking out RIGHT NOW, and why? What makes a “Behemoth book”?

You Promised Me Darkness is absolutely chewing up the market right now as it keeps breaking these crazy sales records as a black and white horror comic in a marketplace where four-color comics reign supreme. I am absolutely loving all the excitement looming for this series as it hits shelves over the summer. There are some really exciting licensed books that we’ll be announcing soon enough that will probably turn some heads, too. We’ll have to wait and see! I don’t want to spoil anything just yet.

Also, check out Kevin Roditeli’s Happy Tank imprint. This guy is an absolute animal whose energy is contagious. He’s at the helm of our MFKZ project that I think is going to be big deal book this year.

Graphic Policy: It’s no secret that comics is a volatile field. Behemoth is making important deals with the likes of Simon & Schuster and Netflix. How critical is that to the ongoing success of a young company, and how to those alliances impact the development of new titles?

Steve Ekstrom: I think the most important thing we can do is continue to provide top-notch content. I know that seems like such a generic answer, but when you think about it, quality is really all it boils down to when you’re in a market where two companies hold 90-ish% of the sales figures.

We just have to keep making solid choices on the content we’re going to produce. Nathan and Ryan have some really fantastic concepts for marketable products coming down the pipeline that I would have never conceived on my own. I can’t wait to talk more about this stuff as it comes to fruition.

Other than quality, we just need to keep finding hungry talent with projects that fit our mold. This is a savvy brand that, while we may have sort of an outlier’s sensibility, we’re also determined to put out technically competent, well-crafted comics and graphic novels as well as innovative cross-promotional materials like miniatures, shirts and even records. We’ve got vinyl, man! How cool is that?

Graphic Policy: Last words: what do you personally want the world to know about you and the work you’re about to do?

Steve Ekstrom: I’m an ambidextrous Scorpio with a penchant for 70’s R&B and enchiladas? Nah, that’s pretty much common knowledge…

Right now, I am connected to seven or eight ridiculously amazing projects as either a writer, a letterer, an editor or some amalgamation of those three roles and I cannot wait to share these stories with the world.

I’ve spent my entire life loving comics as a fan. I grew up and went to school to learn how to write because I was a storyteller as a kid. I entered this industry as a guy who wanted to bring reader response criticism from the classroom to book reviews and I knew I wasn’t discovering fire or anything but I wanted to put butts in seats and I did it. I care about this business and I want to give back to it after a lifetime plus some of entertainment and joy.

I get to curate my own line of comics. I want to work with anyone that is hungry and motivated like me. I want to give a platform to new creators who understand how to make professional looking comics. This is a business first and foremost. We have to walk a line between commercially viable products, fine art and counter culture that surfs the edges of the cultural zeitgeist.

Keep your eyes on the Behemoth website and our social media for announcements concerning submission guidelines for D2D and PRIMER as well as other news about shows we will be attending later in the year and the release dates for all of our upcoming projects.

We’ve got content scheduled all the way out until the middle of 2022.

And we’re really just getting warmed up. All hail Behemoth!

ComiXology Has Your New (Digital) Comic Needs Covered. New Releases from Marvel, IDW, Image, BOOM!, AfterShock, and More!

Locke & Key/Sandman: Hell & Gone #1

Today’s new comic book day and comiXology has your digital comic releases covered. Get shopping for what’s new now or check out the releases by the publisher below.

AAM-Markosia

Ablaze

Abstract Studio

AfterShock

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

Behemoth

BOOM! Studios

Caliber Comics

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

DC Thomson

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Kingstone Comics

Legendary Comics

Marvel

Oni Press

Papercutz

Tidawlwave Productions

Titan Comics

Valiant Entertainment

Vault Comics

Zenescope


This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Today’s New Digital Comic Releases Sees Over 100 New Comics from Marvel, BOOM!, Image, AfterShock, and More!

King in Black #5

It’s new comic book day and comiXology has you covered with new releases. You can find new releases from Marvel, BOOM!, Image, IDW, Titan, and so much more. You can get shopping now or check out the new releases by the publisher below.

A Wave Blue World

Ablaze

AfterShock

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

Behemoth

BOOM! Studios

Comicraft

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

Dynamite Entertainment

Fantagraphics

Harlequin

Heavy Metal

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Kingstone Comics

Marvel

Oni Press

Tidalwave Productions

Titan Comics

Valiant Entertainment

Vault Comics

Zenescope


This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Today’s New Digital Comic Releases Features Over 150 New Comics

BeQuest #1

Today’s new comic book day and comiXology has you covered with your digital comic needs. There are over 150 new comics from Marvel, IDW, Image, BOOM!, and more! Start shopping now or check out the individual releases below.

A Wave Blue World

AAM-Markosia

Ablaze

Abstract Studio

AfterShock

Albatross Funnybooks

American Mythology Productions

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

Behemoth

BOOM! Studios

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse

DC Comics

DC Thomson

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

Humanoids

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Kingstone Comics

Kodansha

Marvel

Oni Press

Papercutz

Tidalwave Productions

Valiant

Vault Comics

Zenescope


This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Behemoth’s You Promised Me Darkness #1 Sells Over 30,000 Copies

Behemoth has announced that their hit comic You Promised Me Darkness #1 has sold over 30,000 copies.

Approximately every 75 years, Halley’s Comet orbits around the sun, and every time this happens people around the world are born with incredible abilities, special auras that grant them with supernatural skills, but those auras can also be cursed. Yuko and Sebastian, two siblings with special auras are constantly running from an evil being, known as the “Anti-everything,” who feeds from these special auras, getting stronger with each intake. This being is obsessed with these brothers’ auras and will not stop until he feasts on them.

The four-issue series is by writer/artist Damian Connelly. Connelly has revealed that a second arc is being developed to be released later this year. This is instead of a spin-off series, that’s being moved down the road for release at a later date.

Today’s New Digital Comics Sees Over 125 Releases from Marvel, BOOM!, Image, AfterShock, and more!

Scout's Honor #3

It’s new comic book day and there’s over 125 new releases available now digitally on comiXology. You can get shopping now or check out the individual issues below.

A Wave Blue World

AAM-Markosia

AfterShock

Albatross Funnybooks

American Mythology Productions

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

Behemoth

BOOM! Studios

Clover Press

Comicraft

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

Humanoids

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Keenspot

Kingstone Comics

Marvel

Oni Press

Tidalwave Productions

Titan Comics

Valiant

Vault Comics

Zenescope


This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

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