Tag Archives: annalisa leoni

Robert Kirkman and artist Lorenzo De Felici’s Oblivion Song is Being Adapted for Film by Universal

Oblivion Song Chapter One

Skybound Entertainment and Universal Pictures announced this morning that the sci-fi drama Oblivion Song—based upon the New York Times bestselling Robert Kirkman and artist Lorenzo De Felici’s bestselling comic book series of the same name—is being developed for film. 

Universal’s Executive Vice President of Production Jon Mone and Director of Development Lexi Barta will oversee the project on behalf of the studio. The Oblivion Song adaptation will be produced by Skybound’s film team, including Robert Kirkman, David Alpert, Bryan Furst, and Sean Furst, with Sean O’Keefe attached to write the script. 

O’Keefe’s latest project, Wonderland, which stars Mark Wahlberg with Peter Berg directing, recently wrapped filming. O’Keefe sold the first script based on the Robert B. Parker bestselling Spenser book series in a deal with Netflix.

Oblivion Song Chapter Two

Image and Skybound Entertainment’s Oblivion Song by Kirkman and De Felici is colored by Annalisa Leoni, lettered by Rus Wooton, and edited by Sean Mackiewicz. It takes place a decade after 300,000 citizens of Philadelphia were suddenly lost in Oblivion. The government made every attempt to recover them but after many years they gave up. Nathan Cole won’t. He makes daily trips, risking his life to try and rescue those lost, alone and afraid, living in the apocalyptic hellscape of Oblivion. But maybe… Nathan is looking for something else. Why can’t he resist the siren call of the Oblivion Song?

Oblivion Song, Vol. 1 (ISBN: 978-1534306424) and Oblivion Song, Vol. 2 (ISBN: 978-1534310575) trade paperbacks are available now in comic shops and at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, IndieBound, and Indigo.

Image Reveals #WeBelieve in Colorists Apperciation Variants

Image Comics has revealed the black and white Spawn #286 cover artwork by legendary artist Todd McFarlane and the seven Colorist Appreciation variants that display the high impact of colorists on the artistic medium.

A selection of bestselling colorists—Moreno Dinisio, Frank Martin, Matthew Wilson, Owen Gieni, Annalisa Leoni, Nikos Koutsis, Jean-Francois Beaulieu—each put their own spin on the same McFarlane cover for these #WeBelieve in Colorists variants, and each cover displays their radically different techniques and stunning results.

We Believe in Colorists is the second of many initiatives throughout Image’s planned #WeBelieve 2018 campaign highlighting the important, lately overlooked talent of the comics industry.

Comics is a visual storytelling medium with an artist’s inks and the colorist’s pallete working hand in hand to convey the tone and mood within a finished piece of artwork.

Available on Wednesday, May 30th, final order cutoff deadline on Monday, May 7th:

  • Spawn #286 CVR A B&W by McFarlane (FEB188683)
  • Spawn #286 CVR B by Dinisio (FEB188684)
  • Spawn #286 CVR C by Martin (FEB188685)
  • Spawn #286 CVR D by Wilson (FEB188686)
  • Spawn #286 CVR E by Gieni (FEB188687)
  • Spawn #286 CVR F by Leoni (FEB188688)
  • Spawn #286 CVR G by Koutsis (FEB188689)
  • Spawn #286 CVR H by Beaulieu (FEB188690)

Review: Oblivion Song #1

A decade ago, 300,000 citizens of Philadelphia were suddenly lost in Oblivion. The government made every attempt to recover them, but after many years, they gave up. Nathan Cole…won’t. He makes daily trips, risking his life to try and rescue those still living in the apocalyptic hellscape of Oblivion. But maybe…Nathan is looking for something else? Why can’t he resist the siren call of the Oblivion Song?

Oblivion Song is the brand new series from creator Robert Kirkman, the creator of The Walking Dead and Outcast. To get any new series from him is a big deal as you expect a big hit and some great ideas and concepts. Oblivion Song delivers with a story that while it seems like it focuses on other dimensions/other worlds but is really about the search for a missing brother and experienced trauma.

The first issue introduces us to the world splitting time between the alien Oblivion and the real world of Philadelphia. The story’s heart revolves around the character Nathan searching for survivors as well as his brother. This is a search and rescue mission much like those done post Vietnam to find capture soldiers and return bodies of the fallen to their loved ones. That reflection is evident here not just in actions but Kirkman goes so far to reinforce the parallel with a dark wall etched with the names of those missing. Add in debates about government funding for the project and the duty to return Americans and you have a story that takes a real world experience and uses that as an influence to drive the story and do so for the better.

As I mentioned above, the other part of the story is the trauma of those who have returned from the world of Oblivion. It’s clear this is a focus and something that will be explored more, especially how one integrates back into society after the experience. Much like his other work, Kirkman is focusing on the personal touch and the human aspects of the world he has created.

The art by Lorenzo De Felici and colorist Annalisa Leoni manages to capture the strange duality of this series in a superb manner. We see both worlds and there’s clearly lots of thought into the creatures of the Oblivion, the tech, and also the impact of the event on the real world. Small touches are throughout such as the worn and used look of the equipment Nathan uses down to the clothes he wears. There’s a story for every little bit. The creatures too feel like they’ve been thought out to the point of how they move and survive in this alien world. Every detail matters and here they enhance the story.

There’s a lot of build up to this first issue and it lives up to the hype in every way. It’s a fantastic new series that delivers in experience and characters and there’s no doubt it’ll be a hit and massive seller. The visuals and world building is fantastic, with every detail adding to the experience. But, it’s the heart and experience at the center of it all that’s the driver. We get the sense of loss and trauma from these characters. Their pathos is our draw. There’s clearly a lot of thought put into not just the first issue but the series as a whole and we’re in for an interesting an entertaining ride.

Story: Robert Kirkman Art: Lorenzo De Felici Color: Annalisa Leoni
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.75 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: Oblivion Song #1

A decade ago, 300,000 citizens of Philadelphia were suddenly lost in Oblivion. The government made every attempt to recover them, but after many years, they gave up. Nathan Cole…won’t. He makes daily trips, risking his life to try and rescue those still living in the apocalyptic hellscape of Oblivion. But maybe…Nathan is looking for something else? Why can’t he resist the siren call of the Oblivion Song?

Oblivion Song is an interesting new tale from the mind of Robert Kirkman. The first issue introduces us to the world splitting time between the Oblivion world of Philadelphia and the real world equivalent. The story’s heart revolves around the character Nathan searching for survivors as well as his brother, before the various monsters and creatures can consume him. But that’s not the only challenge, in the real world, Nathan and a few other fight to get proper funding for their project that the government yanked. Will Nathan find his brother, or will he be lost to the Oblivion? That seems to be the main focus in a series whose first issue also touches upon PTSD and a world dealing with the aftermath.

The art by Lorenzo De Felici and colorist Annalisa Leoni manages to capture the strange duality of this series in a superb manner. It brings to life strange monstrous and frequently ugly creatures in the Oblivion and the consumed landscape of Philadelphia. There’s contrast of the unusual landscape of Oblivion with things and items not yet consumed by it. That detail extends to the real world where small details like names on a memorial and news crawl deliver as much story as the monsters within.

The first issue is hyped and delivers an experience that entertains and creates a world we both do and don’t want to visit.

Story: Robert Kirkman Art: Lorenzo De Felici Color: Annalisa Leoni
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Robert Kirkman Talks Oblivion Song and How He’s a Comic Book Kind of Guy

A decade ago 300,000 citizens of Philadelphia were suddenly lost in Oblivion. The government made every attempt to recover them but after many years they gave up. Nathan Cole… won’t. He makes daily trips, risking his life to try and rescue those lost, alone and afraid, living in the apocalyptic hellscape of Oblivion. But maybe… Nathan is looking for something else? Why can’t he resist the siren call of the Oblivion Song?

Oblivion Song is the new comic series from writer Robert Kirkman, artist Lorenzo De Felici, colorist Annalisa Leoni, and letterer Rus Wooton being published by Skybound Entertainment and Image Comics.

The series follows Nathan Cole as he goes into another dimension, the Oblivion, looking for survivors, a sci-fi story that’s unique in many ways, not just on the page but also the lead up to its release on March 7, 2018.

Kirkman and De Felici have worked on the comic for over a year allowing them to polish the story which included adding pages to earlier issues after reading later ones. The lesson is not to rush to market, it can help make a much better comic. With a sibling Kirkman felt the

The core concept of the series is the guilt the main character feels and his search for his brother. Unlike Kirkman’s Walking Dead and Invincible, this series is about two brothers as opposed to father and son. There’s unique aspects to the relationship and there’s dynamics there that don’t exist elsewhere due to that relationship. It’s an area that yields to a lot of story potential.

Nathan is an aspirational character who see injustice and wants to do something about it. In an interview roundtable, Kirkman said it was fun to write a character who’s willing to make sacrifices. A character, that can be put on a pedestal and be admired.

De Felici has been in comics for a long time, and Kirkman was directed towards him by Cory Walker about three years ago. The style is unique that lends itself well to a monster heavy series. He has a background in science that is being brought to the series. The series needs someone who can do a scene in a cafe over coffee and an entire alien ecosystem. He’s able to juggle both worlds.

We were able to participate in a roundtable discussion of which you can find our questions below.

Graphic Policy: With your success in other media, has it changed your approach to this at all?

Robert Kirkman: It’s something I try to ignore but I can’t but think the kind of things that get translated into other media have universal appeal. The kind of comics that seem to have universal appeal. The kind of comics I like to do have universal appeal.

It’s not like I sit around with artists thinking about things that can easily be translated into a cool movie or television show.

It’s a goal of coming up with something that entertains yourself. That entertains a lot of people. It could lend itself to another medium. As long as you strive for something as interesting as possible or as cool as possible it somehow is tailor made for this kind of thing.

This doesn’t seem like it’d lend itself to another medium, but we’ll see. It’s always in the back of mind just because I’ve had success in the past. But, I’m a comic book writer first and foremost.

When I sit down to come up with an idea for a comic book it’s really about if it’s something that I’d enjoy doing? Does it excite me? Will it make a cool comic book? Any thought about another medium is secondary.

I’m a comics first kind of guy.

GP: The first issue strikes me as something that reflects a lot on the years after the United States and Vietnam? There’s the wall, not leaving someone behind.

RK: That’s all there. That’s a perfect example of a time in our history of these themes. That’s something I drew from because it’s all there. It’s a perfect example of how people reacted so it’d be foolish for me to not acknowledge that.

GP: The first issue touches on PTSD with a few characters. How much is that explored in the series?

RK: That’s a big part of the first year of the book. What they would have gone through. How they would have survived. And that I think is the aspect that most resembles The Walking Dead. This is the type of Walking Dead story where someone could have lived in a zombie apocalypse for ten years and then somehow could have gone home. I think that’s really exciting because it changes the story dynamic up from what I’ve been doing with The Walking Dead. It’s also a great minefield for story development. How does someone survive in another dimension? Scavenge for food? Fighting for survival? And then one day go through a portal and Starbucks is down the street and rent’s due. You have to get back to life. There’s a great bit of potential there.

That’s something we’ll be exploring with Duncan and newer characters that are being rescued that have to acclimate to life on Earth.

GP: You tackled a bunch of different genres and now sci-fi. How’s it feel to you as a writer to go in a whole new direction.

RK: I’ve done a lot of horror and there’s some horror aspects to this but to have new tools in the tool box and to be able to expand what you can do with your storyline is really rewarding. I think the thing that keeps me energized in comics, that gets me to want to write me, is the fact that you can do a wide range of things. I do have freedom to do whatever I want. To be able to bounce between genres and expand what I’m known for is a great opportunity. TO be able to dive into a whole new genre and tell all sorts of different stories is really excited for me. I’m happy to do it and hopefully I’ll be able to do it all kinds of times on all kinds of books going forward.

GP: There’s a memorial scene in the first issue that’s very interesting and there’s a poem on it. Is there any significance to the poem?

RK: Yeah, there’s significance behind everything. I’m not going to get into where that’s going. There’ll definitely be focus put on that in the future. You were meant to notice it.

GP: The series is heavy sci-fi, how much thought towards the tech of the world have you done?

RK: That’s crazy sci-fi fun. There’s not too much basis in reality there. We try to think of pseudo-science things that sound logical to a certain extent. We talk about molecule vibration and tuning into one dimension or another. As far as functionality of things, we wanted to play up the aspect that this is busted beaten up technology that’s been used for ten years. A belts malfunctioning in the first issue. We wanted it to feel like duct tape and ripping wires apart to get it to work. We wanted it to feel real world but taken for granted.

I’ve always loved George Lucas’ concept of “used future” that he did in THX and then Star Wars. That these are lived in and not being used for the first time. This is not clean in a way that some sci-fi things are clean.

We wanted everything to be used, dirty, and functional. You’ll see this is a guy who’s been doing this for ten years and lost his funding and trying to make it work somehow and often times it doesn’t work.

GP: So, you have one series that hasn’t dealt in the “why” of it. Will this one, will we find out the “why” as to all of it has happened.

RK: Yes, absolutely, we’ll find out. We’ll slowly pull back the layers as to what occurred and how it occurred as the series progresses. There’ll be various different stages along the way. We’ll get a piece here and a piece here. This will be a fun mystery as it comes together. This is not a story where I won’t be answering how it has happened. It will be revealed as the series goes on.