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Review: Batman: The Imposter #1

Batman: The Imposter #1

It’s only a few years into Batman’s war on crime and the city isn’t quite sure what to make of him. Batman: The Imposter #1 is the latest DC Black Label Batman comic delivering a start that sets up a series full of potential. While Batman’s war on crime shows signs of some success, grumblings under Gotham indicate he’s angered forces that would rather see him go away. An ambitious Detective Wong is trying to put pieces together as to who Batman might be and what his connection is to Gotham’s wealth.

Written by Mattson Tomlin Batman: The Imposter #1 is an interesting beginning. It’s a dual narrative examining Batman and also examining Batman through the eyes of the police. Early on, Bruce is forced into the care of Dr. Thompkins, expanding his discussions with the doctor about his anger to his motivation to seek justice.

While the comic doesn’t dive too deep into all of that yet, it does bring an interesting perspective. Bruce must meet with Thompkins. If he doesn’t, she has threatened him with revealing his identity to the police. But, as a Doctor, she has a responsibility of a patient is going to harm themself or others. There’s a dance between the two that I hope we see more of as the series progresses.

The other exploration of Batman is by Detective Wong. The Gotham Police Department is no longer lead by Gordon and instead has no issue bringing Batman in. Wong is on the trail and through her, we get to see an interesting dive in trying to figure out who’s under the mask. Tomlin does a great job of teasing and dropping hints for the police but never makes it obvious. There’s small details that show Batman/Bruce has thought about this sort of situation. But, Wong is smart enough to figure out and accept that whomever is under the mask, they’re bankrolled in some way and that means the place to start is with Gotham’s wealthy. Again, it’s a solid addition to the story of Batman and gives a grounded perspective that makes you wonder why Gotham PD has never bothered with this before.

The art by Andrea Sorrentino is fantastic. With color by Jordie Bellaire, the duo have created a moody comic that gives us a dark and grimy traditional Gotham. The city, and the people within, feel dirty and worn down. This is a world that doesn’t yet have colorful characters but all the same is a colorful character in itself. “Grounded” feels like the best way to describe the look and feel of this take. It feels more like what we have seen of Matt Reeve’s upcoming The Batman. There’s a realistic quality about it all that balances the fantastical elements of Batman’s world.

Batman: The Imposter #1 is a fantastic start to the series. It isn’t some dark and gritty read one might expect from DC Black Label. Instead, the issue has a very practical approach to it all. What Batman even faces is down-to-earth in some ways. Combine that with some great art and this feels like there’s potential here for a memorable Batman story people will come back to for a while.

Story: Mattson Tomlin Art: Andrea Sorrentino Color: Jordie Bellaire
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.75 Overall: 8.6 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Preview: Batman: The Imposter #1

Batman: The Imposter #1

Written by: Mattson Tomlin
Art by: Andrea Sorrentino

Bruce Wayne’s mission as the Batman has only been underway for a year or so, but he can tell he’s making a difference. Unfortunately, he’s made some powerful enemies. All the traditional power brokers of Gotham resent the disruption the Batman has brought to town…and it seems one of them has a plan to neutralize him. There’s a second Batman haunting Gotham’s rooftops and alleys—and this one has no qualms about murdering criminals, live and on tape. With the entire might of the Gotham City Police Department and Gotham’s rich and powerful coming down on his head, Batman must find this imposter and somehow clear his name…but how can you prove your innocence from behind a mask?

Director and screenwriter Mattson Tomlin (Project Power, Little Fish) has teamed up with Eisner-winning suspense and horror artist Andrea Sorrentino (Joker: Killer Smile, Gideon Falls) to create a wholly new version of Gotham City, informed by grim reality, where every punch leaves a broken bone and every action has consequences far, far beyond Batman’s imagination!

Batman: The Imposter #1

Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s Primordial Rockets to a Second Printing

Superstars Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s new series—Primordial—launched with a shower of enthusiasm across the industry and sold out completely at the distributor level. The issue is being rushed back to print in order to keep up with customer demand.

Primordial reveals to readers that In 1957, the USSR launched the dog, Laika, into Earth’s orbit. Two years later, the USA responded with two monkeys, Able and Baker. These animals never returned. But, unbeknownst to everyone, they did not die in orbit…they were taken. And now they are coming home.

This six issue miniseries is the most recent collaboration from the creative team who brought readers the Eisner Award winning, critically lauded Gideon Falls.

Primordial #1, second printing (Diamond Code AUG218388) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, October 20.

Primordial #1, second printing

Review: Primordial #1

Primordial #1
Primordial #1, cover by Andrea Sorrentino

The Space Race between the Soviets and the Americans during the 1960s has always been fertile ground for conspiracy-centric storytelling, ripe with classic sci-fi concepts and ideas informed by a long tradition of weird fiction. Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s new book, Primordial, is firmly set within that tradition, but what it’s managed to produce on the visual front is what truly stands out as special.

Primordial follows a black electrical engineer from MIT called Dr. Pembrook, a man who’s interest in an American space mission where monkeys were shot into space to test travel by shuttle leads him to a secret report about the operation’s hasty cancellation that questions whether the alleged failure of the project was fact or an elaborate fiction to cover something up.

Pembrook’s discovery pushed him down the rabbit hole into conspiracy territory, led by a question that instantly makes the story take a whole new spin: what if the animal shuttle flights revealed something that scared everyone into not pursing further travel?

Lemire’s script perfectly captures the nail-biting paranoia that tends to be a staple in these types of stories, but when things get cosmic, it’s Sorrentino who steps up and steals the spotlight. It works because Lemire allows the plot to unravel in two spaces, if you will, in which Pembrook’s side is allowed to develop on its own while the animals’ flight is also given room to present its trajectory.

Primordial #1
Primordial #1

The more traditional, almost spy-thriller aspects of the story belong to Pembrook while the all-out sci-fi part of the equation is afforded to the animals. Sorrentino capitalizes on the setup to let loose in what can only be described as pure and unfiltered creativity, especially when it comes to the space travel sequences.

Panel work in these sections of the book break with structure and form to reach a higher level of visual play that ranges from panel collisions to colors flying off into unexpected parts of the page. It all combines to create a sense of wonder and even fear that frames the animals’ experience as a complete transformation of the rules of physics that will transport them to uniquely unknown places.

It tips its hat to Jack Kirby sci-fi, but it also borrows from classic rock and prog album cover art to breath life into many of the surprises the book viscerally throws at its readers as the story’s pacing picks up. In other words, Primordial is a visual marvel, a feast for the eyes that’s hard not to get lost in.

Dave Stewart’s coloring is largely responsible for the visuals’ triumphs as well. The book is bright and it captures the kind of naïve optimism that tends to characterize attempts at space travel. It makes for an experience in which the unknown is given a chance to reveal itself and to pose questions that go beyond what’s seen. Stewart’s work elevates that idea and gives it new dimensions.

Primordial #1 possesses a very exciting and intense sense of discovery and exploration that rests on the notion that secrets and conspiracies can generate quite a set of sense-shattering images. It’s a supreme example of what can be achieved with visual storytelling and how comics can offer narrative possibilities other mediums can only hope to imagine.

Story: Jeff Lemire Art: Andrea Sorrentino Colors: Dave Stewart
Story: 9.0 Art: 10 Recommendation: Read and make sure to give comics to space animals for their voyages

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Early Review: Primordial #1

Primordial #1
Primordial #1, cover by Andrea Sorrentino

The Space Race between the Soviets and the Americans during the 1960s has always been fertile ground for conspiracy-centric storytelling, ripe with classic sci-fi concepts and ideas informed by a long tradition of weird fiction. Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino’s new book, Primordial, is firmly set within that tradition, but what it’s managed to produce on the visual front is what truly stands out as special.

Primordial follows a black electrical engineer from MIT called Dr. Pembrook, a man who’s interest in an American space mission where monkeys were shot into space to test travel by shuttle leads him to a secret report about the operation’s hasty cancellation that questions whether the alleged failure of the project was fact or an elaborate fiction to cover something up.

Pembrook’s discovery pushed him down the rabbit hole into conspiracy territory, led by a question that instantly makes the story take a whole new spin: what if the animal shuttle flights revealed something that scared everyone into not pursing further travel?

Lemire’s script perfectly captures the nail-biting paranoia that tends to be a staple in these types of stories, but when things get cosmic, it’s Sorrentino who steps up and steals the spotlight. It works because Lemire allows the plot to unravel in two spaces, if you will, in which Pembrook’s side is allowed to develop on its own while the animals’ flight is also given room to present its trajectory.

Primordial #1
Primordial #1

The more traditional, almost spy-thriller aspects of the story belong to Pembrook while the all-out sci-fi part of the equation is afforded to the animals. Sorrentino capitalizes on the setup to let loose in what can only be described as pure and unfiltered creativity, especially when it comes to the space travel sequences.

Panel work in these sections of the book break with structure and form to reach a higher level of visual play that ranges from panel collisions to colors flying off into unexpected parts of the page. It all combines to create a sense of wonder and even fear that frames the animals’ experience as a complete transformation of the rules of physics that will transport them to uniquely unknown places.

It tips its hat to Jack Kirby sci-fi, but it also borrows from classic rock and prog album cover art to breath life into many of the surprises the book viscerally throws at its readers as the story’s pacing picks up. In other words, Primordial is a visual marvel, a feast for the eyes that’s hard not to get lost in.

Dave Stewart’s coloring is largely responsible for the visuals’ triumphs as well. The book is bright and it captures the kind of naïve optimism that tends to characterize attempts at space travel. It makes for an experience in which the unknown is given a chance to reveal itself and to pose questions that go beyond what’s seen. Stewart’s work elevates that idea and gives it new dimensions.

Primordial #1 possesses a very exciting and intense sense of discovery and exploration that rests on the notion that secrets and conspiracies can generate quite a set of sense-shattering images. It’s a supreme example of what can be achieved with visual storytelling and how comics can offer narrative possibilities other mediums can only hope to imagine.

Story: Jeff Lemire Art: Andrea Sorrentino Colors: Dave Stewart
Story: 9.0 Art: 10 Recommendation: Read and make sure to give comics to space animals for their voyages

Primordial #1 will be available at comic shops on Wednesday, September 15.


Pre-Order: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

What if Batman was Real? Find out in Batman: The Imposter

This October, Batman fans get a new and different look at Gotham’s guardian as he begins his war on crime in Batman: The Imposter, a three-issue Prestige format series from DC. The series will debut in print and on participating digital platforms (English-language version) on Tuesday, October 12, 2021. In addition, the series will be collected in a hardcover format, available on February 22, 2022.

Localized print versions of the series will also launch day and date in the following territories: Spain, Germany, Brazil, Mexico, Italy, France, Russia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Japan, South Korea, Turkey, and Argentina.

Director and screenwriter Mattson Tomlin has teamed up with Eisner-winning suspense and horror artist Andrea Sorrentino and colorist Jordie Bellaire to create a gritty, hard-boiled version of Gotham City, where every punch leaves a broken bone and every action has consequences far, far beyond Batman’s imagination!

Bruce Wayne’s mission as the Batman has only been under way for a year or so, but he can tell he’s making a difference. Unfortunately, he’s made some powerful enemies. All the traditional power brokers of Gotham resent the disruption the Batman has brought to town…and it seems one of them has a plan to neutralize him. There’s a second Batman haunting Gotham’s rooftops and alleys—and this one has no qualms about murdering criminals, live and on tape.

With the entire might of the Gotham City Police Department and Gotham’s rich and powerful coming down on his head, Batman must find this imposter and somehow clear his name…but how can you prove your innocence from behind a mask?

Batman: The Imposter #1 a variant cover by Lee Bermejo, and 1:25 “ratio” variant by Kaare Andrews.

Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino Launch Primordial in September

Green Arrow, Old Man Logan, and Eisner Award-winning Gideon Falls’ creative team Jeff Lemire and artist Andrea Sorrentino will reunite for an all-new, upcoming six-issue miniseries titled, Primordial. This mind-bending sci-fi/Cold War thriller mashup will launch from Image Comics this September.

Primordial reveals to readers that In 1957, the USSR launched the dog, Laika, into Earth’s orbit. Two years later, the USA responded with two monkeys, Able and Baker. These animals never returned. But, unbeknownst to everyone, they did not die in orbit…they were taken. And now they are coming home.

Primordial #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, September 15:

  • Cover A by Sorrentino – Diamond Code JUL210009   
  • Cover B by Christian Ward – Diamond Code JUL210010
  • Cover C by Dustin Nguyen – Diamond Code JUL210011
  • Cover D by Yuko Shimizu – Diamond Code JUL210012 
  • Cover E blank – Diamond Code JUL210013
  • Cover F (1:25) virgin incentive copy – Diamond Code JUL210014
  • Cover G (1:50) raw virgin B&W incentive copy – Diamond Code JUL210015
  • Cover H (1:75) Moon Footprint incentive copy – Diamond Code JUL210016 
  • Cover I (1:100) incentive copy by Lemire – Diamond Code JUL210017
Primordial #1

Jeff Lemire’s Mazebook Heads to Dark Horse

From Jeff Lemire, the creator of Sweet Tooth and New York Times bestselling and Eisner award-winning Black Hammer comes Mazebook, an ambitious and haunting comic series about family, grief, and loss.      

A lonely building inspector still grieving the loss of his puzzle-loving daughter receives a mysterious phone call one night from a girl claiming to be her, trapped in the middle of a labyrinth. Convinced that his child is contacting him from beyond this world, he uses an unfinished maze from one of her journals and a map of the city to trace an intricate path through a different plane of reality, and embarks on an intense and melancholic adventure to bring his daughter back home.

Mazebook #1 (of five) will be in comic shops on September 8, 2021.

Get a First Look at DC’s Green Arrow 80th Anniversary 100-Page Spectacular!

On June 29, join DC in celebrating eight decades of emerald-clad swashbuckling, crime-fighting, and trick arrows of every kind when the Green Arrow 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1! Honoring Green Arrow and his allies across his 80-year history, from the Golden Age to now, the anniversary special includes 12 stories from some of DC’s most esteemed writers and artists who have contributed to the legacy of Oliver Queen. The title will also include 8-decade variant covers depicting the Emerald Archer through the ages.

This anthology not only features a “who’s – who” of comic book storytellers but also includes a unique and heartfelt tribute to the career of iconic DC and Green Arrow scribe Denny O’Neil“Tap, Tap, Tap” is a silent, wordless story from Denny O’Neil’s son Larry, Jorge Fornes, and Dave Stewart. The story chronicles the challenges and victories in Denny’s life both in and out of comics, from his childhood, raising a family, his stellar career as a writer, until his passing in 2020

Additional stories in this anthology include:

  • “The Disappearing Bandit”
    Written by Mariko Tamaki, Art by Javier Rodriguez
    It’s the Golden Age of Green Arrow and Speedy, brought to humorous and loving life by New York Times bestselling writer Mariko Tamaki (Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass) and acclaimed artist Javier Rodriguez (Batgirl: Year One). A lot of people attempt to affectionately show the silliness of the first age of super heroes, but few have done it as exceptionally as Mariko and Javier. Trick arrows for everyone!
  • “Punching Evil”
    Written by Tom Taylor, Art by Nicola Scott, Colors by Annette Kwok
    To become a more adept superhero and fighter, Green Arrow goes to train with the Golden Age superhero Wildcat at his gym. In true Wildcat fashion, he shows Ollie the hard way of what it takes to be your own hero. Tom Taylor (NightwingSuicide SquadInjustice) brings this story to life, with incredible artwork from Nicola Scott (Wonder Woman 75th Anniversary Special) and Annette Kwok (Joker/Harley: Criminal Sanity).
  • “Who Watches the Watchtower?”
    Written by Stephanie Phillips, Art by Chris Mooneyham, Colors by Mike Spicer
    The Green Arrow is left behind on the Justice League Satellite while the rest of the team goes on an important mission. Oliver is less than thrilled, and righteously indignant about the situation as usual until an alien armada invades the Satellite. Can Ollie stand alone against an alien onslaught before it reaches earth? Acclaimed writer Stephanie Phillips (Harley Quinn) captures that “Denny O’Neil Green Arrow”-voice, and this story is brought to life in gorgeous fashion by Christopher Mooneyham’s (Nightwing) retro/modern bronze age aesthetic.
  • “Out of the Shadows”
    Written and Art by Mike Grell, Colors by Lovern Kindzerski
    Legendary Green Arrow writer and artist Mike Grell return to the 1980’s era of The Longbow Hunters. The Green Arrow must team up with the legendary anti-hero Shado to stop a shipment of smuggled guns from making it into Seattle. Depicting The Emerald Archer as only he can, Grell will remind readers why his take on Ollie Queen is still a Green standard.
  • “The Arrow and the Song”
    Written by Ram V, Art by Christopher Mitten, Colors by Ivan Plascencia
    This tale is a beautiful meditation on the love between Green Arrow and Black Canary through the years and the found family that they’ve created. Writer Ram V (Catwoman) puts together this beautiful story of love and how life takes turns you don’t expect. Gloriously brought to life by the work of Christopher Mitten (Batman: Arkham Unhinged) and Ivan Plascencia (The Flash).
  • “One”
    Written by Brandon Thomas, Art by Jorge Corona, Colors by Matheus Lopes
    We go right back to the mid-90s with this story. Oliver Queen is dead. Connor Hawke is Green Arrow and he has to save the main Queen Industries building in Star City, the home of a business and family he was never part of, from a group of terrorists. Brought to you by Infinite Frontier and Future State writer Brandon Thomas (Future State: Aquaman) and amazingly drawn by Jorge Corona (We Are Robin).
  • “Green Man and Autumn Son”
    Written by Devin Grayson, Art by Max Fiumara
    Catwoman writer Devin Grayson and artist Max Fiumara shine a spotlight on Roy Harper, a.k.a Red Arrow, as he continues to manage his transition from “sidekick” to adult hero, along with single parenthood and his struggles with addiction and recovery.
  • “Star City Star”
    Written and Art by Phil Hester, Inks by Ande Parks, Colors by Trish Mulvihill
    Phil Hester drew nearly fifty issues of Green Arrow in the early 2000s, working with popular writers like Kevin Smith, Brad Meltzer, and Judd Winnick. Here, Phil synthesizes what was so great about his run into a tremendous eight-page story. Green Arrow tries to save a young girl named Star who has been kidnapped but has to run through a gauntlet of his greatest villains and allies to get to her. Including: Onomatopoeia, Speedy (Mia Dearden), Green Lantern (Hal Jordan), Black Canary, Arsenal, Connor Hawke, and Count Vertigo.
  • “Happy Anniversary”
    Written by Vita Ayala, Art by Laura Braga, Colors by Adriano Lucas
    This story focuses on the point in time where Green Arrow and Black Canary were married right before the New 52. On the day of their anniversary, the two are at each other’s throats and then Green Arrow gets kidnapped. Black Canary thinks the kidnapping is part of an anniversary game/present but quickly discovers that Green Arrow has REALLY been kidnapped by DEATHSTROKE and she has to save him. Vita Ayala (Future State: The Next Batman) writes a wonderful Mr. and Mrs. Smith-style action rom-com brought to life by Laura Braga (DC Comics Bombshells).
  • “The Sympathy of the Woods”
    Written by Ben Percy, Art by Otto Schmidt
    It’s the DC Rebirth Era, Green Arrow is feeling lost, the world is getting worse, and he doesn’t feel like he’s making enough of a difference. To cheer him up, Black Canary, Red Arrow (Emiko Queen), Diggle, and Henry Fyffe try to throw him a party to remind him of the beautiful community he’s built. But what starts as a celebration will become a rescue mission as Green Arrow is hunted down by the Dark Archer known as MERLYN. From DC talents Ben Percy (Nightwing) and Otto Schmidt (Harley Quinn).
  • “The Last Green Arrow Story”
    Written by Jeff Lemire, Art by Andrea Sorrentino, Colors by Jordie Bellaire
    The acclaimed Green Arrow creative team from the New 52, New York Times Bestselling author Jeff Lemire (Sweet Tooth)  and Andrea Sorrentino (Joker: Killer Smile) tell a transcendent final tale of Oliver Queen. In his older years, he requests to be left alone on the island where he was stranded so many decades ago. He’s gone there to connect to his own myth, his legacy, and to die in peace. But is it ever that simple for The Green Arrow?

The variant covers for this must-have collector’s item come from some of the most prolific artists in comics:

  • 1940’s Variant: Michael Cho
  • 1950’s Variant: Daniel Warren Johnson
  • 1960’s Variant: Neal Adams
  • 1970’s Variant: Derrick Chew
  • 1980’s Variant: Gary Frank
  • 1990’s Variant: Howard Porter
  • 2000’s Variant: Jen Bartel
  • 2010’s Variant: Simone Di Meo

Green Arrow 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1 arrives in participating comic book stores and digitally on Tuesday, June 29, 2020, for $9.99.

Matt Kindt, Tyler Jenkins, and Hilary Jenkins’ Fear Case #1 Sells Out Ahead of Release and Gets a Second Printing

The series debut of the anticipated horror comic Fear Case by writer Matt Kindt, artist Tyler Jenkins, and colorist Hilary Jenkins has sold out at the distributor level ahead of its February 3, 2021, on-sale date. Dark Horse Comics has tapped the critically acclaimed Andrea Sorrentino to provide a new cover for the issue’s second printing.       

Described as “True Detective” meets “The Ring”, Fear Case marks Matt Kindt’s first foray into the horror genre.

Fear Case #1, out on February 3, 2021, features a standard cover by Tyler Jenkins and variant covers by Francesco Francavilla and Duncan Fegredo. Dark Horse Comics will publish the second printing variant of issue 1, featuring an all-new cover by Andrea Sorrentino, on February 10th, 2020.

Fear Case #1
Almost American
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