Review: The Corsair

The Corsair

Starz Network has had some shows that have more than captured the public’s attention. The recently concluded Power has made the network a destination for prestige shows. Then there is the period drama, Da Vinci’s Demons which told a rather blustery vision of the tortured genius. Then there are the three adaptations of Philippa Gregory’s books which recounts famous historical events in England through the eyes of the prominent female royals that occupied those courts.

My favorite show of all time from the network is Black Sails. The show sought to tell the story of an island where a good number of history’s most famous pirates converged to war against each other and eventually to join each other in a world that sought to wipe out their existence. It was true light to the many names that ran through history but also to show they became immortal in the eyes of the readers of swashbuckling tales. In the graphic novel, The Corsair, we find another sea tale, one in which this crew of pirates with a mix of the mystical, search for the treasure of one Captain “Calico Jack” Rackham.

In these times of peace with the treacherous Albion, an incredible event will upset the monotonous routine of the King of France’s corsairs.

A veritable genie, distant cousin of Aladdin’s genie from ‘1001 Nights’, offers them three wishes. These expert pirates fall into a series of adventures which will make them cross the southern seas in the search of The Treasure of Rackham The Cruel.

In his direct and bright painting style, artist Vincent Pompetti brings an epic breath to this story of pirates imagined by wrier Tarek.

The story is one of adventure and mysticism mixing on familiar pirate tropes with those of wishes granted be genies. It’s a mix of genres you don’t see too often and delivers an exciting swashbuckling tale on the high seas.

Overall, The Corsair is an exciting tale that gives me echoes of Black Sails with a bit of Aladdin. That combination makes this graphic novel more than seaworthy. The story by Tarek is more true to life of what the pirates went through than the tall tales that inhabit the genre. The art by Pompetti is incredibly beautiful. Altogether, a tale which is clever, well developed, and has me rearing to watching a rerun of Black Sails.

Story: Tarek Translation: Andrew Benteau Art: Vincent Pompetti
Story: 10 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy