Review: I, Parrot

I recently watched a movie, starring Renee Zellweger, called My One and Only. It was about George Hamilton ‘s mother and how she moved on from his father with George and his brother in tow. What started out as a woman being jilted by love and loss became a story of redemption and owning one’s self worth. She was before her time, finding courage where none exists.

That type of personal strength can still be found, as the recent spotlight of the #MeToo movement, showed the world, that abuse of power will no longer be tolerated. Which is why the hollow cries of these people in power, are always shrouded in doubt of the accuser and its only purpose is self-preservation ad should never be excused. There are stories like this all the time, some not as severe, but unjust wrongs nonetheless. Deb Olin Unferth and Elizabeth Haidle’s I, Parrot echoed these same injustices.

In the opening pages, we meet Daphne, a woman down on her luck, and everything has not gone her way. She has lost custody of her son, her landlord is crazy, and she is working a dead-end job. She soon enlists the help of some unlikely allies including her one true love, Laker and a house full of exotic pigeons. By book’s end, Daphne, her son, Laker and even the pigeons find out the meaning of freedom.

Overall, an engaging book, that starts out as “lovable loser” story but becomes one of self-discovery. The story by Unferth is beautiful, funny and engrossing. The art by Haidle is alluring. Altogether, a book which shows that not only animals are in cages but all of us, find freedom the same way.

Story: Deb Olin Unferth Art: Elizabeth Haidle
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy