Review: The Mercenary Volume 1 The Cult of the Sacred Fire

Seven Samurai is one of those films that both film snobs and general film fans both agree is a classic. It sounds simple enough of a premise, as a band of mercenaries are hired to protect a village from invaders. What usually gets lost in people’s description of the movie, is the powerful performances by the seven men who inhabit the key protagonists. Each of their motivations, are different at the beginning but become singular at the very end.

Most “hired guns” in literature usually resemble the archetype of the anti-hero, a person whose moral compass is hard to read, the most infamous one being, Spike Spiegel, from Cowboy Bebop. I remember the first time I saw the show, it was like nothing else I have seen on television, as here was a protagonist that did not care about doing the right thing and would never get caught up committing acts of self-sacrifice. Few characters act like this, as most writers likely imbue their characters some sense of principles, as they may find readers are attracted to protagonists who act like this, but characters like Spiegel, draw interest because they are amoral.  The title character in The Mercenary Volume 1: The Cult of The Sacred Fire, a man who totally concerned about doing his job only

Within the firs few pages, we find out that he has been contracted to rescue a young woman from a dangerous cult. He finds hers danged naked from a cliff, which is a trap, as he rescues her but gets chased by a legion of interceptors, who they escape but scathed. We find the mercenary and the escapee finding alternate ways to reach back to her husband, where finds treachery and must flee to rescue another young woman, who is being imprisoned by a strange cult. By book’s end, the cut is more than it first seems, and although he saves the young woman he was contracted to save, many live are lost in the wake of his actions.

Overall, an excellent adventure book, which is classic sword and sorcery, using classic tropes within the genre to create an enjoyable tale. The story by Vicente Segrelles is wall to wall action, as the hero faces all along the way. The art by Segrelles is feel likes matte paintings as every panel is quite gorgeous. Altogether, an engaging book abbreviated enough for any reader to take a short trip.

Story: Vicente Segrelles Art: Vicente Segrelles
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

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