Review: Malika: Warrior Queen Part One

When John Campbell’s book, “The Hero’s Journey”, is brought up in conversations on television and in lectures, it usually talks about male characters. The most prominent example that is brought up is Odysseus, as his journey which took many years, not only formed him as a hero but also a man, thus the hero’s journey. Another popular example, is of course, Luke Skywalker. Rarely, in these conversations, are a female protagonist, have ever been brought up.

There have been more than few characters that stand out in my mind in just about all forms of media. In To Kill a Mockingbird, although Atticus Finch, is the hero, Boo, is just as a strong a character, and almost even more integral to the plot. On TV, probably one of its most popular shows, Orange Is the New Black, is a story full of strong female protagonists, which initially focused on one the first season but ultimately expanded into just about all the characters’ stories being explored. This brings me, to one of the most interesting characters I have read in a long time, Malika, Warrior Queen.

In the opening moments of the book, we are introduced to a young lady training for battle in the city of Azzaz, little do we know, she would become the Queen of this empire. At her doorstep, is an army from the Ming Dynasty, looking to take her lands and enslave her people. She is joined by an old friend, who is known to his foes as the Windmaker, as he proves to more than just an ally, leaving her foe decimated. By the end of this volume, our heroine has gained victory but her troubles have not ended with the whisperings of evil in the form dark magic nearby.

Overall, a strong volume to a character will want to know, as this heroine is like nothing anyone has ever seen before, with traits that most writers would only give to a male protagonist.  The story by Roye Okupe feels like those 70s sword sagas and has all the grit of Conan. The art by Godwin Akpan, Chima Kalu, Raphael Kazeem, Paul Louis-Julie, Osas Asemota, Omotuyi Ebota and Collins Momodu, is pretty, lush, and masterful. Altogether, a great introduction, to a female hero that the world has always needed.

Story: Roye Okupe Art: Godwin Akpan, Chima Kalu, Raphael Kazeem, Paul Louis-Julie, Osas Asemota, Omotuyi Ebota and Collins Momodu
Story:10 Art:10 Overall:10 Recommendation: Buy

YouNeek Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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2 comments

  • Um, you mean Joseph Campbell? And the book was actually called “The Hero With a Thousand Faces.” And whoever you have heard talk about the hero’s journey, which is a concept in his book, probably didn’t read it either. Here’s a quote, “The removal of the feminine into another form symbolizes the beginning of the fall from perfection into duality; and it was naturally followed by the discovery of the duality of good and evil.” Anyway, good try.

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    • Thank you for completely missing the point

      Sent from my iPhone

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