Review: Coven #2

coven002It is common among the independent publishers that they tend to take more chances and to give more creative control to their writers and artists.  Despite that, Zenescope could be identified as one of the companies that does so less than than others.  After the initial success of Grimm Fairy Tales, it mostly figured out this formula and while there is always room for creativity, it has also not deviated too far from this script too often.  This is perhaps most true in the main Grimm Fairy Tales title, which while it has moved into more of a Young Adult setting, is also one which hasn’t really tried to push its own boundaries since its early days.  There is of course another problem for an independent like Zenescope and that is exposure.  With a much smaller portion of the comic market, they have to make calculated decisions more so than the bigger companies, which can give secondary characters a chance to shine in their own series before letting them fail and pass back into obscurity. This leaves many of the more intriguing characters that Zenescope has at its disposal often unused with the likes of Britney Waters, Liesel Van Helsing and Baba Yaga often reduced to only cameo appearances.

What Zenescope does do well though is give its second tier group of heroines a chance to shine in miniseries, and such is the case with Coven.  As was shown in the first issue, a small coven of witches is attacked with their leader subdued and kidnapped while the others are murdered.  Baba Yaga intervenes in order to find one of her disciples and in this issue enlists the aid of some other powerful witches before launching her rescue mission.

While an occult vs. military concept is not exactly new, it is interesting to see it in this setting for Grimm Fairy Tales.  While a lot of the properties for Grimm Fairy Tales can be fun, they also seem to be in somewhat of a comfort zone, and don’t really move much beyond that.  This series on the other hand seems to be trying a few new things, and while they are not spectacular at least deserve to be recognized as such.  Also worthy of recognition is that the series features Baba Yaga, on the surface a strange choice for a series protagonist but also one that works in this setting.  This might not be an amazing series, but it is fun and worth a look for those that don’t mind a bit of a mix between genres.

Story: Zach Calig Art: Diego Galindo
Story: 8.7 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.7 Recommendation: Buy