Review: Alex + Ada #15

aa015Alex + Ada is a series which is heavy on a variety of themes.  The invasion of the public into our private lives, whether artificial intelligence can be real or what the role of technology will be in our lives as we move forward in our civilization.  While these all elicit interesting questions from this series, the most enduring underlying theme in this series has been that of love.  Ada is a robot whose sentience was unlocked and discovered what love was, while Alex had a seemingly unlikely route to love after he lost touch with love after his fiancee walked out on him.  In both cases it seemed like love between these two might have been impossible but it became possible as Alex learned to accept that it is a more universal concept than with a man and a woman, while Ada learned what love was after being born as an adult-like human-like android woman.

These unlikely lovers came to be chased and captured as a result of Alex’s illegal opening of Ada’s sentience, an act which they had to hide in order for them to live their lives safely.  This of course has parallels to modern society where people are not allowed who they want because society judges them for their choices which defy societal conventions.  As a theme therefore love is the constant in this final issue of the series, as Alex is captured and sentenced to prison, and as he deals with the waiting for what was the love of his life.

While this works as theme for this final issue, it is also handled in a clunky way at times.  Of course with Ada being a robot there are some technical aspects of her consciousness which are a bit mysterious when it comes to how she loves and how she stores her emotions.  As the issue begins to get into a bit of virtual psychology it loses some of its steam from a story telling standpoint, even if the theme itself is spot on.  This makes this final issue a bit of a mixture, both doing the overall series justice but also failing a bit to reach the same height as its predecessors.  It wraps up the series in a way that we could expect, only not quite telling the full story that was there to be told.

Story: Sarah Vaughn and Jonathan Luna Art: Jonathan Luna
Story: 8.2 Art: 8.2 Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Read

Image provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.