Review: Robyn Hood #11

rh011Among all of the comic book publishers it is Zenescope that seems to be the most aware inside its own universe of the existence of comic book conventions.  While comics about comics have occurred since well over five decades (it was a comic about a comic that launched the DC multiverse in the 1960s) there have always been a bit of a mismatch.  After all superhero comics are about the superhero world which is otherwise unattainable, and it would remain to be seen if such stories would even be necessary in such a world where people could just turn on the news for what is fantastic and extraordinary.  It is specifically comic book conventions that Zenescope has interest in though, and often to match up with the the convention season in summer time, specifically the one in San Diego.

This backdrop forms the basis for this issue, a one shot story mostly set aside from the ongoing story in this series.  Robyn and Marian are hired to find a hammer which is cursed, but which is also a family heirloom.  The owner of the hammer wanted to rid himself of the curse by selling it, but in having done so he finds that it has not worked.  He is still cursed but no longer has the hammer and wants it back.  The problem is that the hammer is in the hands of a dealer that wants to sell it at a comic con, and that means that Robyn and Marian have to attend to buy it.  There are other parties interested as well, specifically a group of wolfmen that want the hammer back after it had been taken from them many centuries previous, and so reacquiring the hammer is not as easy, instead Robyn has to fight her way past the wolfpack.

There are a couple of cute moments here, but mostly this issue falls a little short.  It is only when the issue actually acknowledges that it is a bit too meta that it succeeds.  This is over a spread page where Marian chooses her costume for the comic con, the choosing and the choice of being the highlight of this particular issue.  As always with this series, it seems as though all the pieces are there, only that they are not balanced correctly, and so this still remains Zenescope’s weakest monthly title.

 Story: Patrick Shand  Art: Roberta Ingranata
Story: 6.3  Art: 7.5  Overall:  6.3 Recommendation: Pass