Review: Grimm Fairy Tales 10th Anniversary – Snow White

gft 10 001For those that have been reading Grimm Fairy Tales from the very beginning, this issue will represent a return to the basics of the series.  Whereas the original concept has mostly been discarded or expanded upon into a huge multiverse, it is perhaps the first twenty or so issues of the main series which were so noteworthy and worthwhile.  These stories represented a combination of modern morality tale, as highlighted by a classic fairy tale, but with the lack of approachable fairy tales and the need for some kind of a narrative the concept behind the series changed somewhat into what it is now.  The series still has its fans, even though it can tend to be a bit too complicated at times with its ties to all kinds of myths, legends, and fairy tales.

This specific story looks at the return of what should have been an old nemesis for Sela, although it is examined through the perspective of the modern mess that the series can resemble.  The manner in which Sela is explained the occurrences is a bit lazy.  She is upset at Druanna about not being forthcoming with the truth, but it is an easy plot device for just adding new material in which the characters should have known from their past.  Aside from that this is a fairly engaging issue which focuses on Sela’s book, long since gone but back now at the hands of what they call a Binder, a person capable of recording all manners of stories.  There are some action sequences, and some other sequences that tend towards a bit more gore, but the overall story holds together well enough.

The story telling in this issue is something that the main series has been lacking for a long time.  It can be easily said that Grimm Fairy Tales have deviated far from the formula that made it popular to begin with, and despite its continued success, the return to this more simple concept works well for the series, even when it still has some influence from the modern tales.  In the end the connection to the titular Snow White is a bit far-fetched, but it d doesn’t matter as the issues manages to work on its own merits.

Story: Joe Brusha, Ralph Tedesco and Lou Iovino Art: Manuel Preitano
Story: 8.2 Art: 8.2 Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Read