Tag Archives: star wars: the mandalorian

The Mandalorian Returns with a New Pauldron in a New Mando Mini-Bust!

The Mandalorian Season 2 is heating up Disney+, and fans are hanging on every episode to see where the Mandalorian will go and what enemies and allies will turn up next. Gentle Giant Ltd. is throwing back to one of the earliest episodes for an ultra-limited, special variant mini-bust!

The Mandalorian (Beskar Pauldron) 1/6 Scale Mini-Bust upgrades the original Mandalorian mini-bust to the next level with his first Beskar pauldron, crafted by the Armorer. With his flamethrower raised and his blaster at the ready, Din Djarin™ is prepared to take on even the most formidable opponents.

Standing approximately 7 inches tell with translucent flame effects, this 1/6 scale mini-bust is limited to only 500 pieces and is exclusively available through gentlegiantltd.com. Pre-orders are open.

Those Two Geeks Episode Ninety Two: This is The Mandalorian One

Alex and Joe talk about the first five episodes of The Mandalorian on Disney+ with spoilers (though not as many as they expect).

As always, Alex and Joe can be found on twitter respectively @karcossa and @jcb_smark if you feel the need to tell them they’re wrong individually, or @those2geeks if you want to yell at them together on twitter, or by email at ItsThose2Geeks@gmail.com.

Hasbro Reveals a Star Wars: The Vintage Collection Greef Karga and The Child on Mando Monday

STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH GREEF KARGA Figure

(HASBRO/Age 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $12.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans and collectors can imagine scenes from the STAR WARS Galaxy with this STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH GREEF KARGA Figure, inspired by THE MANDALORIAN live-action series on Disney Plus. Featuring premium detail and design, as well as original Kenner branding, this collectible action figure makes a great gift for STAR WARS fans and collectors. Highly poseable with realistic detail, including a photoreal face, the STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH GREEF KARGA Figure can be displayed in action figure and vehicle collections. Includes figure and 2 accessories. Available for pre-order at Amazon, Entertainment Earth, Big Bad Toy Store, and Dorkside Toys.

STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH THE CHILD Figure

(HASBRO/Age 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $12.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans and collectors can imagine scenes from the STAR WARS Galaxy with this STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH THE CHILD Figure, inspired by THE MANDALORIAN live-action series on Disney Plus. Featuring premium detail and design, as well as original Kenner branding, this collectible figure makes a great gift for STAR WARS fans and collectors. Highly poseable with realistic detail, the STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH THE CHILD Figure with hover pram can be displayed in action figure and vehicle collections. Includes figure and 2 accessories. Available for pre-order at Amazon, Entertainment Earth, Big Bad Toy Store, and Dorkside Toys.

TV Review: The Mandalorian S2E4 “Chapter 12: The Siege”

 THE MANDALORIAN S2E4 "CHAPTER 12: THE SIEGE"

Mando checks in with some old friends, The Child heads to (pre) school, there’s a couple twists on some old Star Wars set pieces, and honestly, everyone ends up in worse trouble in The Mandalorian Season 2, Episode 4 ” Chapter 12: The Siege“, written by Jon Favreau and directed by Carl Weathers. With its planet/adventure of the week plot structure, The Mandalorian doesn’t have an ensemble cast, but it does have a couple of interesting recurring guest actors. Weathers and Favreau use them nicely in this episode and also provide more commentary on the post-fall of the Empire universe as the New Republic struggles to connect with the Outer Rim (Even though its greatest hero is from there!) and the remnants of the Empire engage in a very Star Wars form of eugenics to try to get back in power.

In this episode, Mando goes to the planet Navaro (Where the pilot and a bit of the previous season took place.) to finally get the Razor Crest repaired and travel to Corvus to meet the last scion of the Jedi, Ahsoka Tano. These days, Navaro is pretty law abiding thanks to Marshal Cara Dune (Notable transphobe, anti-masker and general conspiracy theorist Gina Carano) and Magistrate Greef Karga (Weathers). There’s a school, commerce, and Karga has even employed former Mando bounty, Mythrol (Horatio Sanz) as his accountant to work of his debts. (Think Suicide Squad, but number crunching.) However, on the other side of the planet, there’s an Imperial base with a lot of heavy weaponry, and while Mando is waiting for his ship to be fixed, Dune and Karga rope him into blowing its reactor and bringing peace to the planet with Mythrol acting as hacker, lockpick, and getaway driver.

Mythrol’s getaway driver status is short lived when the team discovers that the base isn’t your run of a mill, but a lab where Imperial scientists are running very unethical tests and experiments on subjects using The Child’s blood. However, they’ve run out and need to recapture him again so this episode becomes a lot more complicated than blowing up a base over a lava pit and going home. As soon as Mando hears The Child is in danger, he jets off to protect him while Dune, Karga, and Mythrol end up in a speeder chase in the Star Wars equivalent of a Ford F-150. You can feel Weathers and cinematographer Matthew Jensen‘s glee in this sequence, which goes full Grand Theft Auto and escalates to TIE fighters and wraps up in a very A New Hope way.

My favorite part of “The Siege” was the adrenaline-filled third act where Imperial scout troopers actually behaved cleverly for once and may have actually gotten the upper hand if they weren’t so fanatical. (See last episode’s cyanide pill popping.) However, Carl Weathers and Jon Favreau spend the first bit of the episode showing the change and growth that Mando, Dune, Karga, and even Mythrol have gone through since last season. Dune has gone from a mercenary and prize fighter to a sheriff, who can keep the peace with her blaster and physical combat skills while Karga is back to his old respected government job ways instead of running numbers and bounties. However, he’s got a little bit of edge as evidenced by making Mythrol take all the big risks during the Imperial Base caper. Mythrol is still cowardly and wants to make an extra buck, but his new job keeps him in line. Dune and Karga’s goals have gone from trying to make a buck and forget about their more traditionally noble or heroic pasts to helping others and creating a safe “green zone” on where folks can live a life free from New Republic policing and bureaucracy and Imperial fascism.

And Mando has changed the most. He’s gone from treating the Child like a bundle, nuisance, or McGuffin to straight up treating him like a son. For example, in the beginning of “The Siege”, Mando tries to walk The Child through fixing something on Razor Crest because the little cutie can fit in tight spaces. However, this is a little advanced for him, and honestly, Mando should have just let him do the sci-fi western equivalent of holding the flashlight. Weathers and Favreau even riff on the dread “first day of school” when Karga tells Mando to drop him off at the classroom while they go on their mission. Weathers inserts a lingering shot of him looking away as The Child immediately gets into mischief and uses The Force to steal a classmate’s snack. Mando’s motivation is keeping The Child safe, happy, and hopefully one day, reconnected with others like him. This is a hell of a thing to build a TV show around and demonstrates why so many folks have emotionally connected with The Mandalorian.

 THE MANDALORIAN S2E4 "CHAPTER 12: THE SIEGE"

The Mandalorian Season 2 continues to be in conversation with previous iterations of Star Wars, and after last week’s detour to Clone Wars and Rebels, we’re back to the original trilogy. Carl Weathers and Jon Favreau go full fanboy (But not in a toxic way.) and insert in all kinds of goodies like the aforementioned speeder bike chase, blowing up a reactor a la Endor, the classic gunner heads up display used in Vader’s TIE fighter and the Millennium Falcon, and in a touching moment even though Carano doesn’t quite sell the emotion, Alderaan. The inclusion of these elements create a nostalgic reaction in viewers that helps some of the themes that Favreau is exploring go down easier like the Rebels transformation into New Republic beat cops. I mean, we go from Han Solo and Wedge Antilles to some protocol spouting guy in an orange jacket using the death of all of Dune’s friends and relatives on Alderaan to recruit to “join the force”. I find the politics and tension of this era of Star Wars history really fascinating, especially when Favreau gives us this boots on the ground view although the information about Mandalorians is interesting too and places Mando in a larger context beyond “lone badass with a soft spot for a cute, occasionally bratty kid.”

“Chapter 12: The Siege” has a tense chase scene, a pleasant performance from Carl Weathers as Greef Karga and continues to show the bond between Mando and The Child in a sweet, occasionally funny way as it’s interesting to see Pedro Pascal change his body language and movements from sharing some soup with him to gunning down stormtroopers and pulling off crazy maneuvers in good-as-new Razor Crest. However, Jon Favreau undercuts this fancy flying and uses the last moments of the episode to have Giancarlo Esposito’s Moff Gideon raise this season’s stakes with a slight eyebrow movement. He’s a great villain, Mando knows he’s alive now, and I can’t wait for their rematch down the road.

Overall Verdict: 8.4

Hasbro Reveals New Star Wars: The Black Series for Mando Monday!

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES 6-INCH REMNANT TROOPER Figure

(HASBRO/Age 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $19.99/Available: Fall 2020)

Fans and collectors can imagine scenes from the STAR WARS Galaxy with this premium STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES 6-INCH REMNANT TROOPER Figure, inspired by the live-action THE MANDALORIAN series on Disney Plus. STAR WARS  fans and collectors can display this 6-inch scale highly poseable, fully articulated figure, featuring premium deco, in their action figure and vehicle collection. Includes figure and accessory. Available for pre-order exclusively at Target.

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES THE MANDALORIAN ELECTRONIC HELMET

(HASBRO/Age 14 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $119.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans and collectors can imagine scenes from the STAR WARS Galaxy with this STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES THE MANDALORIAN ELECTRONIC HELMET, inspired by the live-action THE MANDALORIAN series on Disney Plus. Featuring highly-detailed deco, series-inspired design, interior padding, and an adjustable fit, this helmet is a great addition to any STAR WARS collection. This screen-inspired reproduction helmet features a removable tactical light, as well as dual red interior lights that can be activated while the helmet is upside-down. Requires 1 1.5V AA battery, not included. Includes helmet and instructions. Available for pre-order at Hasbro Pulse and Amazon.

Mando Monday Includes a New Vintage Collection Figure and Mandalorian on Bantha Funko Pop!

It’s Mando Monday and there’s two new releases out today!

His body is shielded by beskar armor, his face hidden behind a T-visored mask, and his past is wrapped in mystery. No one is quite sure who this well-equipped stranger is – except you, because you saw his name and face in that one episode. Star Wars The Vintage Collection The Mandalorian (Full Beskar) 3 3/4-Inch Action Figure includes blaster pistol and rifle, and is shiny.

You can pre-order it now from Entertainment Earth and other shops.

Star Wars The Vintage Collection The Mandalorian (Full Beskar) 3 3/4-Inch Action Figure

The Star Wars: The Mandalorian Mando on Bantha with Child in Bag Deluxe Pop! Vinyl Figure can be added to your Funko collection! What troubles will the two escape on their interplanetary adventure? This vinyl bobble head is approximately 6 3/4-inches tall and comes packaged in a window display box.

You can pre-order it now from Entertainment Earth and other toy shops.

Star Wars: The Mandalorian Mando on Bantha with Child in Bag Deluxe Pop! Vinyl Figure

TV Review: The Mandalorian S2E1 “Chapter 9: The Marshal”

The Mandalorian S2E1

This review contains spoilers for The Mandalorian Season 2, Episode 1 “Chapter 9: The Marshal”

It’s becoming an old adage that television in the 2010s (And now, the 2020s, I guess) has abandoned the art of the single episode and instead wants to be a 10-hour movie. (Or 13 in the case of the Marvel Netflix shows.) However, The Mandalorian bucked that trend and became a kind of Have – Gun Will Travel meets Lone Wolf and Cub wrapped up in a shiny cinematic package with talented guest stars, directors that some would consider to be auteurs, and of course, having a connection to the immersive world of Star Wars without the ol’ Skywalker. Each episode is a Western mini-movie with just enough serialization to get audiences to tune in next week. Or keep subscribing to the streaming service. And “The Marshal” is no exception.

Before getting into the episode’s main plot, writer/director/show creator Jon Favreau crafts a bit of a cold open to remind viewers that Mando (Pedro Pascal) is a laconic badass, a man of honor especially where his beskar armor is concerned, and desperately cares for The Child aka Baby Yoda. (Even though he takes him to some not very child-friendly places, a Gamorrean deathmatch isn’t Chuck E. Cheese.) The sequence also establishes Season 2’s overarching plot, which is that Mando is looking for The Child’s people, and to find them, he needs to find more of his people, the Mandalorians. This is why he’s at the aforementioned deathmatch even though Mando isn’t a gambling man.

However, his contact, the Cyclopean alien Gor Koresh (John Leguizamo) sees more value in his armor than in his paltry excuse for a fighter, and we get to see some of Mando’s new toys he picked up last season in action. Pedro Pascal brings great physicality to this sequence, and Emmy Award winning cinematographer Greig Fraser shoots the fight like a boxing match while adding some levity when The Child slowly closes his cradle when he realizes his daddy is going to cause some carnage. Ludwig Goransson’s score really helps the opening scene build starting with percussion, then guitars, and finally into the show’s iconic theme music as Koresh gets his comeuppance courtesy of some critters hinted at in an earlier dark and gritty tracking shot, and Mando is off to good ol’ Tattooine to find another Mandalorian.

After an adrenaline-filled, almost neo-noir opening sequence, Favreau is back in Western mode as Mando and The Child visit the nearly abandoned Tatooine mining town of Mos Pelgo, which Peli Motto (Amy Sedaris) treats as the neglected sibling of the more famous Mos Eisley and Mos Espa in an adorable guest scene. Sedaris brings a dose of comic relief and acts as Favreau’s commentary on rabid fandom surrounding The Child as she offers to buy him or his future offspring. She’s a bit of sunshine before they arrive in the bleak ghost town of Mos Pelgo, and Favreau introduces a fairly basic theme of working together despite one’s differences as a gun slinger duel between Mando and Marshal Cobb Vanth (An incredibly well-cast Timothy Olyphant) over his Jawa-bought Mandalorian armor turns into a Jaws with sand as a Krayt dragon (Whose call Obi Wan used to scare off the Tusken Raiders in A New Hope) slithers through town. This sets up the main plot of this episode of The Mandalorian, which is that Mando, Cobb, the townspeople of Mos Pelgo, and the local Tusken Raiders must join forces to kill the Krayt dragon once and for all.

The Mandalorian S2E1

Also, there’s a kicker about Cobb’s armor: it belonged to Boba Fett. He’s not a Mandalorian and obviously knows nothing about The Way as he immediately takes off his helmet upon meeting Mando as Olyphant exudes casual contempt. Jon Favreau’s script and direction of “The Marshal” is richly intertextual without being mere fanservice. He uses familiar touchstones to play with audience’s preconceptions, and where George Lucas saw stereotypes or archetypes, he does something a little more nuanced. In a flashback scene, Favreau shows that the destruction of the Second Death Star didn’t have a positive effect on every planet in the galaxy and led to the Mining Collective taking over Mos Pelgo until Marshal Cobb uses some random crystals that he finds to purchase Fett’s armor and shoot and guided homing missile his way back to a semblance of law and order. The scene of Cobb breathlessly crawling through the desert makes him a sympathetic figure that transcends his initial “gunslinger of the week” trappings, which would frankly be a waste of Olyphant’s talents.

Even better is Jon Favreau’s reclamation of the Tusken Raiders, who had been relegated to something to avoid or even slaughter in Lucas’ films. (Notice how Anakin’s actions towards them in Attack of the Clones were justified until he killed women and children.) He uses them as a (Let’s be honest: a bit on the nose) sci-fi metaphor for indigenous people in “The Marshal” with Cobb refusing to drink their “smelly” water in a scene where Mando is trying to set up an alliance and use their knowledge of the Krayt dragon to take it down. Olyphant does a good job playing the uncomfortable colonizer as Mando effortlessly communicates via low tones, hand signals, and the occasional loud utterance while Cobb and later the townspeople feel awkward and even react in anger when a Tusken raider fumbles an explosive charge. The agreement that Mos Pelgo and the Tuskens make also acts as a commentary on Western countries’ preemptive strikes as in exchange for the Krayt dragon’s blood and carcass, the Tuskens won’t attack Mos Pelgo unless they are attacked first. This has happened in the past as evidenced by a one-liner about Cobb not drinking their water even though he and his miners had stolen it in previously.

Along with using Star Wars lore to make sociopolitical commentary, “The Marshal” is also a damn fun monster movie. Favreau parcels out just enough exposition to make Mando, the Tuskens, and Cobb’s plan easy to follow and then shoots it all to hell to keep things interesting. He goes the Steven Spielberg route and saves the big money shot of the monster for the end of the episode using the effects of its actions like the sand shifting and windmills aggressively blowing as well as stories of its exploits (It ate the Sarlacc and is living in its lair!) to build tension. And it lives up to the hype with some wonderful creature design that matches its sandstorm introduction. Also, Mando and Cobb get to fly around on jetpacks to fight it, which is damn cool, and there’s another Boba Fett related Easter Egg that is integral to how they best the creature.

The Mandalorian S2E1

The way that Mando takes down the Krayt dragon also adds to his character as he’s willing to improvise and come up with non-orthodox solutions in stressful situations and is willing to take chances and sacrifice himself for those around him. Even though its the first episode of a season in a show named after him, Pedro Pascal really sells the fact that he might die and makes sure that The Child is well taken care of before he literally goes into the belly of the beast. Although, he doesn’t play an active role in the plot, The Child continues to humanize and soften Mando even in the most high-stress situations.

Some heavy-handedness aside, “The Marshal” is a fun and smart return for The Mandalorian as Jon Favreau and company use the world and mythos of Star Wars to tell a genre-bending story that comments on the role of indigenous people in both science fiction and Western stories. It’s also a hell of a shoot ’em up with cinematic action and a memorable, nuanced guest performance from Timothy Olyphant, who parts as friends with Mando, and I hope makes a return to a series as a gun-slinging lawman that learns to be a little less species-ist. And the final scene is truly a jaw dropper…

Overall Verdict: 8.6

New Star Wars Mandalorian Figures Revealed

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES 6-INCH DIN DJARIN (THE MANDALORIAN) & THE CHILD BUILD-UP PACK

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $34.99/Available: Fall 2020)

Fans and collectors can imagine scenes from the STAR WARS Galaxy with this premium STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES 6-INCH DIN DJARIN (THE MANDALORIAN) & THE CHILD BUILD-UP PACK, inspired by THE MANDALORIAN live-action series on Disney Plus. STAR WARS fans and collectors can display this 6-inch-scale, highly poseable, fully articulated figure, featuring premium deco, in their action figure and vehicle collection. Includes 2 figures and 9 accessories. Available for pre-order exclusively at Target.

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES 6-INCH SPEEDER BIKE SCOUT TROOPER Figure & Vehicle Set

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $49.99/Available: Fall 2020)

Fans can imagine scenes from the STAR WARS Galaxy with this STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES 6- INCH SPEEDER BIKE SCOUT TROOPER Figure & Vehicle Set with THE CHILD accessory, inspired by THE MANDALORIAN live-action series on Disney Plus. STAR WARS fans and collectors can display this 6-inch-scale, highly poseable, fully articulated SCOUT TROOPER figure, featuring premium deco, in their action figure and vehicle collection. Includes figure, vehicle, stand, and 3 accessories. Available for pre-order exclusively at Amazon.

STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH DIN DJARIN (THE MANDALORIAN) & THE CHILD Build-Up Pack

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $17.99/Available: Fall 2020)

Fans and collectors can imagine scenes from the STAR WARS Galaxy with the STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH DIN DJARIN (THE MANDALORIAN) & THE CHILD Build-Up Pack, inspired by THE MANDALORIAN live-action Disney Plus series. Featuring premium detail and design, and original Kenner branding, the STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH DIN DJARIN (THE MANDALORIAN) figure, with battle-weathered deco, and THE CHILD figure can be displayed in action figure and vehicle collections. This figure 2-pack is packed out with additional accessories, including a removable helmet, Imperial credits, camtono, and more. Includes 2 figures and 7 accessories. Available exclusively at Walmart.

STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH THE ARMORER Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $12.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans and collectors can imagine scenes from the STAR WARS Galaxy with this STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH THE ARMORER Figure, inspired by THE MANDALORIAN live- action series on Disney Plus. Highly poseable with realistic detail and featuring premium detail and design, this 3.75-inch figure can be displayed in action figure and vehicle collections. Includes figure and 2 accessories. Available for pre-order at Walmart, Target, Amazon, Dorkside Toys, Entertainment Earth, and Big Bad Toy Store.

STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH MOFF GIDEON Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $12.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Fans and collectors can imagine scenes from the STAR WARS Galaxy with this STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION 3.75-INCH MOFF GIDEON Figure, inspired by THE MANDALORIAN live-action series on Disney Plus. Highly poseable with realistic detail and premium design, including a photoreal face, this 3.75-inch figure can be displayed in action figure and vehicle collections. Includes figure and 3 accessories. Available for pre-order at Walmart, Target, Amazon, Dorkside Toys, Entertainment Earth, and Big Bad Toy Store.

STAR WARS RETRO COLLECTION 3.75-INCH Figure Assortment

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $9.99/Available: Spring 2021)

Kids and collectors alike can imagine the biggest battles and missions in the STAR WARS saga with figures from the STAR WARS RETRO COLLECTION 3.75-INCH Figure Assortment! With exquisite features and decoration, this series embodies the quality and realism that STAR WARS devotees love. The STAR WARS RETRO COLLECTION includes figures from the 40-plus-year legacy of the STAR WARS Galaxy, including movies and live-action series, such as THE MANDALORIAN on Disney Plus. This figure assortment features design and detailing inspired by the original 1970s Star Wars figures, as well as classic Kenner branding and packaging treated with a weathered look. Characters in this assortment include THE MANDALORIAN, CARA DUNE, IG-11, KUIIL, THE CHILD, MOFF GIDEON, and GREEF KARGA. Each figure sold separately. Available for pre-order at Amazon, Target, Walmart, Dorkside Toys, Entertainment Earth, Big Bad Toy Store, and Best Buy.

STAR WARS THE CHILD ANIMATRONIC EDITION WITH 3-IN-1 CARRIER

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: $79.99/Available: Fall 2020)

Now you can become the protector of THE CHILD, also affectionately known to fans as “BABY YODA,” with this STAR WARS THE CHILD ANIMATRONIC EDITION WITH 3-IN-1 CARRIER. Touching the top of THE CHILD’S head activates over 25 sound and motion combinations, including happy and excited sounds, giggles, babbles, and more, all while the figure’s head moves up and down, ears move back and forth, and eyes open and close. Kids can pretend to harness the power of the Force as THE CHILD toy closes its eyes, raises its arm, and sighs as if exerting a great amount of energy. The STAR WARS THE CHILD ANIMATRONIC EDITION comes with a cloth 3-in-1 carrier that can be worn on the chest or over the shoulder, and converts into a sleeping blanket. Includes figure, carrier and MANDALORIAN pendant. Available exclusively on shopDisney.

Super-Articulate: Emerging from Quarantine, Oh Wait, We’re Not Edition

I suppose we could also call this the “best-laid plans” edition. A few months back, I had plans for a particular series of articles under the Super-Articulate banner. And then . . . well . . . you know: things got weird. I was working from home, and that was busy. My wife and teenage sons were in the house, and that was busier. I landed a really big freelance gig (more when I can tell you) and had other freelance stuff happening. And stuff slid.

On the other hand, we’re entering a really big period of new product either the actual shelves are being set up for pre-order. In that bit of a lull, I’m going to look at a new item that started arriving from pre-orders in the past couple of weeks, and a slightly older item that’s still making its way around. They’re both from the Star Wars Black Series. Up first . . .

THE CHILD: The amazing character find of 2019 is . . . tiny. Like, really tiny. Yes, he’s to scale, but holy crap, he’s tiny. It’s kind of insane that the figure is as detailed as it is because, well, did I mention that he’s tiny? The little creature is a shocking 1.1” tall. And yet, the craftsmanship here is crazy. How did they sculpt this? A 2-up would still be less than 2.5”. Was it a 4-up? Regardless, look at the tiny wrinkles on his clothes.

And yet, even with the small size, there’s still some poseability of the head and arms. To be fair, we don’t see the little guy move much beyond that in the show, anyway. Still, I’m struck by how good the Child looks standing next to the Mandalorian. It would have been cool to get the floating pram, but I wouldn’t be shocked to see that made in the future.

Packing in a slide-open plastic case for the three accessories is a genius idea, but it would be insanely easy to lose these. Frankly, I opted to keep them in the case for exactly that reason. The accessories include the ball/control knob from the Razor Crest, the famous bowl from which to sip, and the frog-like creature, suitable for eating.

My overall verdict is that I think it’s great. Yes, I was shocked at the smallness, but it’s scale-appropriate and it’s very well-rendered. It’s also half the cost of a regular Black Series figure, which feels about right. Good on Hasbro to put so much thought into what’s already a hit figure.

General Grievous: Speaking of putting in some thought . . . damn. Grievous is awesome. The entire body and head has to be proprietary tooling, because no one else in the Star Wars Galaxy has body parts like this. The four arms are impressively articulated, given their thinness, and the hands hold the four enclosed lightsabers with ease. I also found the face detail to be well-done and accurate.

Possibly the best part about the Grievous figure is its versatility. The four arms and multiple points of articulation allow for a number of poses. It’s hard to pick one that doesn’t make this guy look good on a shelf. I also find that the cloth cape enhances the look of the figure, as it falls in interesting ways depending on how the arms are posed.

I’ve heard some complaints that the figure is hard to stand, but I had good luck with that. I find that favoring a hunch, as the character generally appears, makes it an easier proposition. I think it’s appropriate that this is a deluxe figure in a larger package and slightly higher price point, given the work that had to go into the unique parts. I also like that it came out just ahead of the new run of prequel figures, particularly that Obi-Wan Kenobi. I think this one’s really solid overall.

That’s all for the moment, everyone. I plan to be back soon to catch up on some Marvel Legends, including the Retro Gray Beast, Rage, Mach-1, and a deep look at the most recent FF assortment (which I only just got myself). Thanks for reading; glad to have you back.

From Jango to Boba, Star Wars Vet Temuera Morrison Tapped for The Mandalorian Season 2

Boba Fett

Temuera Morrison has been cast to play Boba Fett in the second season of the Disney+ series The Mandalorian.

Morrison played Bob’s “father” Jango Fett in Star Wars: Attack of the Clones will don the iconic armor for a “small role” in the second season.

This isn’t the first time Morrison has played Boba Fett. The actor voiced the character for Star Wars: Battlefront, Star Wars: Battlefront II, and Star Wars: Empire at War. He also played Commander Cody in Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith and voiced Delta 28 in Star Wars: Republic Commando.

Jeremy Bulloch originated the live-action role of Boba Fett in Star Wars: Empire Strikes Back and Star Wars: Return of the Jedi. Daniel Logan played a young Boba Fett in Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and voiced the character in Star Wars: The Clone Wars. The character debuted in animated form in 1978 with The Star Wars Holiday Special.

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