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Preview: Star Trek: Mirror War #1

Star Trek: Mirror War #1

(W) David Tipton, Scott Tipton (A) Gavin Smith (CA) J. K. Woodward
In Shops: Oct 13, 2021
SRP: $3.99

Return to the Mirror Universe of The Next Generation with this brand-new series from writers David & Scott Tipton, where familiar faces and exciting new surprises await around every corner!

To conquer the Mirror Universe, Captain Picard must first seize control of the ship-building planet of Faundori! The only problem? Faundori is inside Klingon-Cardassian Alliance territory

Star Trek: Mirror War #1

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Mazebook #2

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Batman: The Imposter #1 (DC Comics) – It’s early on in Batman’s career and there’s a second Batman on the rooftops and this one has no problem with murdering criminals.

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina #9 (Archie Comics/Archie Horror) – We still can’t believe this is finally out and we have a review copy. It feels like forever.

Deadbox #2 (Vault Comics) – Mark Russell is a brilliant satirist and this series is no exception.

I Am Batman #2 (DC Comics) – Jace Fox has been an interesting new Batman and write John Ridley has focused on delivering motivation and depth to the character along with a style of crime fighting that makes the character stand out.

Kang the Conqueror #3 (Marvel) – This is your life Kang! The series has been putting together the rather complicated history of Kang and giving us some interesting new insight into the character.

Mazebook #2 (Dark Horse Comics) – A heavy read focused on a father who has lost his daughter. The first issue was a punch to the gut and we’re expecting much of the same.

No One Left to Fight II #1 (Dark Horse Comics) – Kung-fu over-the-top action.

Science Comics: Whales (First Second) – Always fun. Always education. Great for parents and kids alike!

Star Trek: Mirror War #1 (IDW Publishing) – We’re always up for a trip into Star Trek’s Mirror Universe.

Telepaths #2 (AWA Studios) – The first issue was a nice setup of a world where a large portion gains telepathic powers. What that means for the world seems to be the exploration of the series and we’re intrigued by the concept.

Review: Star Trek: The Mirror War #0

Star Trek: The Mirror War #0

In anepisode of Hollywood Masters, the Farrelly Brothers spoke at length about how the wrote characters and how they develop motive. It was quite compelling and offered an interesting way to examine characters as well as stories. The brothers also gave some insight about how gray fictional characters are, but also people in general. It’s the story the determines how certain characters respond. This doubly true when you talk about Star Trek and anything dealing with the Mirror Universe.

That’s what makes Star Trek so compelling. The show delivers so many motivations for characters and even the same character depending on which universe it takes place in. In Star Trek: The Mirror War #0, we catch up with the crew of Enterprise-D shortly after their defeat in the Prime Universe. And that defeat may spell their doom.

Star Trek: The Mirror War #0 opens up on the Enterprise-D crew as the away team is about to board an empty freighter. The crew believe the ship to be automated and easily cannibalized for supplies. What they soon realize is that they’ve fallen into a Cardassian trap barely escaping. It’s a solid opening full of action and makes you believe things can’t get any worse for the Enterprise and her crew. But, they’re called by to Earth to appear before the Emperor setting up an issue full of machinations, assassination attempts, and betrayal.

Overall, Star Trek: The Mirror War #0 is an excellent story set in the Mirror Universe. It’s a debut that’ll have Star Trek fans remember why that setting works so well for the series. The story by David Tipton and Scott Tipton is enthralling. The art by Carlos Nieto and DC Alonso is gorgeous. Altogether, Star Trek: The Mirror War #0 begins a story which ratchets up all the melodrama we have come to expect from these stories.

Story: David Tipton and Scott Tipton Art: Carlos Nieto
Color: DC Alonso Letterer: Neil Uyetake
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

IDW Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Artie and the Wolf Man

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Artie and the Wolf Moon (Graphic Universe) – Artie sneaks out at night to discover their mother is a werewolf!

Avengers Tech-On #2 (Marvel) – The first issue was a lot of fun as a powered up Red Skull strips the world’s heroes of their powers.

Bad Sister (First Second Books) – A middle grade graphic memoir following a young girl who undergoes a crisis of conscience, realizing that she is a “bad sister.”

Batman #112 (DC Comics) – “Fear State” kicks off as the Scarecrow’s plan for Gotham unfolds.

Bountiful Garden #1 (Mad Cave Studios) – In the year 2200, a team of teenage scientists are sent on a terraforming mission to a distant planet. When they are awakened abruptly, ten years early, halted above a strange planet, the teens are tasked with trying to figure out why they’re stalled – or what stalled them.

Deadbox #1 (Vault Comics) We have an early review and praise this debut.

Glamorella’s Daughter #2 (Literati Press) – The debut issue was fantastic introducing us to a new hero and her daughter who’d rather read books than punch bad guys.

Ka-Zar: Lord of the Savage Land #1 (Marvel) – Ka-Zar is back! We always want to see what’s done with this character that never quite catches on.

Last Flight Out #1 (Dark Horse Comics) – Humanity has chosen to evacuate Earth as a father attempts to make amends with his daughter during the end of the world.

Mazebook #1 (Dark Horse Comics) – Jeff Lemire. Nuff said.

The Nice House on the Lake #4 (DC Comics/DC Black Label) – This series has been amazing with a great mix of horror, mystery, and a focus on the characters. This one delivers some twists that have a major impact.

Nine Stones #1 (Behemoth Comics) – Disturbing dreams shake Alistair “Allie” Jacobi’s nights. But his daytime life is not much better.

Not All Robots #2 (AWA Studios) – In the year of 2056, robots have replaced human beings in the workforce. Mark Russell and Mike Deodato deliver more brilliant commentary.

Savage Circus #6 (Heavy Metal Entertainment) – Strange creators on the loose and a group of thieves. The series has been a lot of fund mashing up genres.

Search for Hu #1 (AfterShock) – A son must protect his parents who a feud breaks out between the two sides of his family.

Snelson #2 (AHOY Comics) – The first issue was interesting looking at “cancel culture”. It didn’t quite deliver the commentary we hoped for but it was enough that we want to see what the second issue has to say.

Star Trek: Mirror War #0 (IDW Publishing) – Star Trek and the Mirror Universe are two things together that always have us interested.

Whistle: A New Gotham Hero (DC Comics) – When Willow discovers that her “uncle” Edward and his friends are actually some of Gotham’s most corrupt criminals, she must make a choice: remain loyal to the man who kept her family together, or use her new powers to be a voice for her community.

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