Tag Archives: simon bowland

Review: Lonely Receiver #3

Catrin Vander might have met a new person and wants her in her life. Lonely Receiver #3 takes us spiraling further into this relationship thriller reminding us of stories such as American Psycho.

Story: Zac Thompson
Art: Jen Hickman
Letterer: Simon Bowland

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Exclusive Preview: Sympathy for No Devils #2

SYMPATHY FOR NO DEVILS #2

Writer: Brandon Thomas 
Artist: Lee Ferguson 
Colorist: Jose Villarrubia 
Letterer: Simon Bowland 
Cover: Lee Ferguson w/ Jose Villarrubia  
Incentive Cover: Michael Gaydos
$3.99 / 32 pages / Color / On sale NOVEMBER 25th

The world’s largest Colossal has been murdered and Winston Wallis – the last human in a world of monsters – has been called in to solve it. Win will need to lean on his ability to be impossibly lucky in order to solve this case…and survive it.

SYMPATHY FOR NO DEVILS #2

Exclusive Preview: Lonely Receiver #3

LONELY RECEIVER #3

Writer: Zac Thompson 
Artist & Colorist: Jen Hickman 
Letterer: Simon Bowland 
Cover: Jen Hickman 
$3.99 / 32 pages / Color / On sale NOVEMBER 4th

Finally putting the shards of her life back together, Catrin finds a new reason to live. A new set of eyes occupy her attention, and obsession grows, love blooms. It’s not a rebound if you found the one you were truly made to love.

A month // of long days/ 
// Finding the one you lost 
In her / you chase away 
/ tell truth // pay a cost.

LONELY RECEIVER #3

Review: Lonely Receiver #2

Catrin Vander, a lonely video producer, buys an Artificial Intelligence partner that’s meant to bond for life. After ten years together, her holographic wife suddenly disconnects without a warning. Lonely Receiver #2 takes us spiraling into this relationship thriller and delivers a lot of questions to ponder.

Story: Zac Thompson
Art: Jen Hickman
Letterer: Simon Bowland

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Dreaming: Waking Hours #3

The Dreaming: Waking Hours #3

The Dreaming: Waking Hours #3 continues to play a fantastic, two world balancing act as single mom/struggling academic Lindy tries to solve the Shakespeare authorship question in the Dreaming surrounded by different versions of the Bard of Avon while Ruin, Jophiel, and the sorceress Heather try to get her out of there. G. Willow Wilson, Nick Robles, and Mat Lopes take what were personally my favorite bits of Sandman (The Shakespeare appearances/historical flashbacks) and put their own compelling spin on it through the addition of their original creations, Lindy and Ruin, who is nightmare that doesn’t want to scare anyone and came to the waking world to be with the man he loves.

Depending on the setting (Shakespeare’s part of The Dreaming, Box of Nightmares, New Jersey), Nick Robles and Mat Lopes switch up their art style and color palette. This makes for engaging reading. These stylistic shifts also mirror plot points and how characters are feeling, especially in the Dreaming which can go from Lindy giving an earnest soliloquy about her decision process into becoming a single mom and struggles into academia to a laid back, double page spread of her enjoying a world that’s just different versions of Shakespeare hanging out, making out, and enjoying life. Lindy’s name drop of Aristophanes’ The Clouds in this scene isn’t just G. Willow Wilson flexing her literary knowledge, but acts as a kind of warning to our protagonist to not get caught up in the theoretical and lose sight of being reunited with her child and, ugh, her thesis in the Waking World.

The art goes from idyllic, even semi-utopian to intense and terrifying when Wilson, Robles, and Lopes check in on The Dreaming: Waking Hours‘ plotlines that don’t involve Lindy and the Shakespeares. Heather has the bright idea of sneaking Jophiel and Ruin through Faerie to get to the Dreaming, but as anyone who has read any classic fairy tales or Vertigo comics, this backfires on them thanks to her ineptitude with magic. (For example, Jophiel was originally summoned because of a spelling error.) In keeping with the Shakespearean theme, Nick Robles does a pure horror take on the mischievous Puck from A Midsummer’s Night Dream, and Mat Lopes uses hot greens and blues to show how close they are to losing control over him. Getting back to the Dreaming isn’t so easy, and the method of their return is Wilson and Robles’ current hook for upcoming issues.

This is reinforced by a watercolor interlude set in the Box of Nightmares that connects directly to plot points in Sandman and gives a glimpse into how Daniel, Morpheus’ successor as Dream of the Endless, runs things. This sequence also features some of Nick Robles’ and Mat Lopes’ most gorgeous art that shows the dark and otherworldly nature of this region, and its rigidity compared to the light and airy cartooning in the other parts of the comic. It’s more Dave McKean than Bill Sienkiewicz, for sure, and re-establishes the seriousness of what Lindy, Heather, Jophiel, and Ruin are going up against.

Nick Robles using watercolors versus pen and ink also acts as a kind of visual metaphor for the theme of chaos versus order that undergirds The Dreaming: Waking Hours #3, and by extension, all human life. Most folks can’t plan out their entire lives or adhere rigidly to one role like some of the more compliant nightmares in The Dreaming. They are more like Lindy or Ruin, who have to deal with issues like an unexpected pregnancy, the terrible academic job market, or dealing with a job they don’t fit in at. (Being a nightmare in this case.) Robles’ art style matching the content and themes of The Dreaming: Waking Hours makes it even more compelling and adds depth to the main characters beyond G. Willow Wilson’s excellent, insightful dialogue. (I love her comparison of adjunct/visiting professor work to monastic life.)

The Dreaming: Waking Hours #3 features magic, even more chaos, surprise cameos, and a visually striking look at human problems through angels, anthropomorphic embodiments, witches, fairies, and dead authors. G. Willow Wilson, Nick Robles, and Mat Lopes have crafted both memorable characters and settings, and I care equally as much about Lindy, Ruin, Jophiel, and even Heather as I do about their take on the Shakespeare authorship question and additions to the Sandman mythos.

Story: G. Willow Wilson Art: Nick Robles
Colors: Mat Lopes Letters: Simon Bowland
Story: 8.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics/DC Black Label provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Review: Lonely Receiver #1

Catrin Vander, a lonely video producer, buys an Artificial Intelligence partner that’s meant to bond for life. After ten years together, her holographic wife suddenly disconnects without a warning. Lonely Receiver #1 kicks of a tale of romance horror with a tech spin.

Story: Zac Thompson
Art: Jen Hickman
Letterer: Simon Bowland

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Adler #3

Adler #3

Much like a traveler on a seventeenth-century steamship, I’ve waited months to return to Victorian England. The wait is finally over as Adler returns to shelves this week with Adler #3. If you need a reminder of how the series began, you can check out my thoughts of the first issue. Then in the second issue, we were introduced to the series’ true “Big Bad.” The last issue also set up the challenges the heroines will face moving forward. Issue #3 expands on these challenges by setting the stakes Irene Adler, Jane Eyre, and Lady Havisham will find themselves pitted against.

After the first issue, each subsequent issue has opened with a “the story so far” section. This section is a nice touch, especially because it’s written like a journal entry and not plain exposition. It’s interesting that we’re still meeting the characters and Tidhar does a great job of using their introductions to increase the reader’s sense of mystery. Even though we’re starting to get an idea of the plot, Tidhar purposely leaves it unclear as to how all the characters fit into that plot. As a result the character development naturally moves the plotlines forward. Often in comic books these two aspects of storytelling run parallel to one another. In Adler, Tidhar blends these two literary elements into an organic storyline.

I really like how McCaffrey draws the characters. Each of the heroines in this series has their own unique look and is drawn like an actual woman. McCaffrey also does a great job drawing the period setting. Everything from the backgrounds to the buildings to the clothing fits the image I have in my head when I think of Victorian England. However, I continue to be baffled by the page layouts. The scene transitions aren’t always clear, and it can make it hard to follow the story. There are occasionally boxes that denote a scene’s location, which helped me keep track of the events in each scene. Yet there were several places across the last two issues, especially as new characters are randomly introduced, that I was forced to go back a few pages and re-read the comic in order to understand what events were occuring in seperate scenes or within the same scene.

Adler #3 was definitely worth the wait. The third issue of this ongoing series had great pacing, fun character moments, and exciting sequences. I’m an avid reader and have read many of the classics. My favorite part about this series is seeing which details from history and literature Tidhar chooses to keep and which he chooses to embellish or take in his own unique direction. In the first issue we get an alternate take on Jane Eyre’s life after the conclusion of her eponymous novel. Last issue, Tidhar took us on a deep dive into the Sherlock Holmes mythos. This issue was my favorite so far as it brought in some of the scientists of the Victorian era. Plus we get our first real glimpse into some steam-punk tech promised by the original description of the series. Much like the works that inspired many of its characters, Adler is quickly shaping up to be a classic.

Story: Lavie Tidhar Art/Color: Paul McCaffrey Letterer: Simon Bowland
Story: 10 Art: 7.0 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Titan Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology – Kindle – Zeus Comics

Preview: Killswitch Volume 1

KILLSWITCH VOLUME 1

Writer(s): Jeffrey and Susan Bridges
Artist Name(s): Walter Geovani (pencils, inks), Brittany Peer (colors), Simon Bowland (letters), Ed Dukeshire (letters)
Cover Artist(s): Diana Van Damme
128 pgs./ M / FC
$14.99

In a future where clairvoyant Augurs are used for their powers but feared, held captive, and persecuted, a disaffected military major is shocked into action by the grim realities of the Augurs’ treatment. She puts her life and career on the line to help them attempt a daring escape from captivity.

KILLSWITCH VOLUME 1

Dynamite Announces a New Packed Release Schedule for July 1

As summer approaches, Dynamite is heating up as the comic industry roars back with its comeback, and is delivering a scorching haul to fans and retailers for July 1st!

To charge up an otherwise slow week of comics releases, Dynamite is bringing its big guns to brighten up the excitement around returning stories and supporting comic shops. Five of the bestselling and best-reviewed titles will all be out the same week.

The issues are:

  • The Boys: Dear Becky #2
  • Vampirella #10
  • Vengeance of Vampirella #8
  • Red Sonja #16
  • Killing Red Sonja #2

As the second season on Prime is set for an official release date any day now, now is the perfect time for fans to dive into the long-awaited sequel to The Boys with the second issue of Dear Becky. Co-creators Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson return with artist Russ Braun, colorist Tony Aviña, and letterer Simon Bowland. The classic creative team is all back years after they concluded the original juggernaut run and they haven’t missed a step.

Dear Becky

Meanwhile, in Vampirella Christoper Priest‘s intricate saga reaches a climax, as Vampirella falls to her lowest point. Still recovering from a traumatic plane crash and turbulent personal life, she turns to others for help – and one may be the mastermind who has been manipulating all the events to date… With stunning covers from Lucio Parrillo, Guillem March, Fay Dalton, Meghan Hetrick, interior artist Ergün Gündüz, and more, this is an issue not to miss.

In the flagship of the other big Woman of Dynamite, Eisner-nominated scribe Mark Russell continues to spin one of the most acclaimed series in the industry in Red Sonja. Exploring concepts like power, war, and leadership, it has only gotten more enticing moving into its second year with the big war won. What happens next for Sonja the Red?

Across that first year of Russell’s Red Sonja, the titular character lead the rag-tag Hyrkanians against a despotic king. With Red Sonja slaying Dragan the Magnificent in a climactic battle, his surviving son Prince Cyril has vowed revenge on the fiery-haired killer. Alongside co-writer Bryce Ingman and fan-favorite artist Craig Rousseau, Mark Russell chronicles that quest in Killing Red Sonja. Spiced with magic, humor, and more, it’s an indisposable companion to the main series.

Fans looking for a straight shot of classic comic book storytelling with modern sensibilities know that Vengeance of Vampirella is a true hit. Or they better get on it fast! The multitalented Tom Sniegoski, who has written everything from the Punisher, Hellboy, Bone, and dozens of novels, returns to the character he defined for an entire decade. Picking right up where he left off in the 1990s, but incorporating the 25-year absence, this book is comfort food for every longtime fan of the Daughter of Drakulon, and also perfectly approachable for all newcomers.

Review: You Are Obsolete

A solid horror story about technology and generations as a reporter investigates an island where children kill off the adults by their 40th birthday. You are Obsolete is a get for fans of psychological horror.

Story: Mathew Klickstein
Art: Evgeniy Bornyakov
Color: Lauren Affe, Pippa Bowland, Francesca Citarelli, Juancho Velez
Letterer: Simon Bowland

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle
comiXology

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

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