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Review: Sympathy For No Devils #5

Sympathy For No Devils #5 wraps up the series as the various strings come together. How well does it close the case? Find out!

Story: Brandon Thomas
Art: Lee Ferguson
Color: Jose Villarrubia
Letterer: Simon Bowland

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics

AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Exclusive Reveal: Check out Jen Hickman’s The Modern Frankenstein #2 Retailer Incentive Cover

We have the exclusive first look at Jen Hickman‘s retailer incentive cover for The Modern Frankenstein #2. If retailers order 10 copies they get one free variant cover by Jen Hickman!

Discover the next thing in horror, The Modern Frankenstein. The comic is from award-winning writer of television and comics Paul Cornell and acclaimed artist/writer Emma Vieceli, along with color artist Pippa Bowland and letterer Simon Bowland!

Elizabeth Cleve is an apprentice to the brilliant, extreme surgeon James Frankenstein. He’s shown her his secret world of forbidden medical experiments. And how their mutual attraction has reached fever pitch. How far will she allow herself to go?

A twisted horror/romance that walks a fine line between attraction and fear.

The Modern Frankenstein #2 is out May 26, 2021.

The Modern Frankenstein #2 Jen Hickman retailer variant

Exclusive Preview: Sympathy for No Devils #5

SYMPATHY FOR NO DEVILS #5

Writer: Brandon Thomas 
Artist: Lee Ferguson 
Colorist: Jose Villarrubia 
Letterer: Simon Bowland 
Cover: Lee Ferguson w/ Jose Villarrubia
$3.99 / 32 pages / Color / On sale 02.24.21

Winston Wallis – the last human in a world of monsters – is so close to the end of this case, with only one obstacle in his way…unfortunately for Win, that obstacle is a Colossus-killer.

SYMPATHY FOR NO DEVILS #5

Legends of the Dark Knight Returns in a Brand New Series

Debuting in 1989, Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight put Batman in the hands of some of the most talented writers and artists in comics, such as Denny O’Neil, Grant Morrison, Ed Hannigan, Mike W. Barr, Doug Moench, José Luis Garcia-López, Klaus Janson, and others. Their efforts yielded unforgettable story arcs for comic book fans, such as “Shaman,” “Prey,” which redefined the evil and twisted Dr. Hugo Strange, “Gothic,” and “Venom,” the story that introduced the dangerous super steroid to a Santa Prisca prison inmate who would later be known as Bane.

On April 2, this influential anthology returns as a new DC Digital First series, Legends of the Dark Knight. Stories will be released digitally as 10-page weekly “chapters,” with two digital chapters making one print issue; issue #1 arrives in comic book stores on May 18Legends of the Dark Knight will serve as a place for both well-known and up-and-coming creative talent to tell new, evergreen stories, appealing to a wide variety of fans, all based on one of the most beloved and enduring characters in popular culture.

Legends of the Dark Knight kicks off with a six-part weekly/three-issue monthly tale, written and illustrated by Darick Robertson, with colors by Diego Rodriguez and letters by Simon Bowland. In “Bad Night, Good Knight,” a new player has arrived on the scene in Gotham City and is selling deadly chemicals to the worst villains in town: Mr. Freeze, the Penguin, and even The Joker! It’s up to Batman to stop the villains, track down the supplier, and save Gotham City from not only his most vicious foes, but this new mystery villain.

Future stories will showcase the talents of writers Stephanie Phillips, Becky Cloonan, Brandon Thomas, Matthew Rosenberg, Brandon Easton, Che Grayson, and comics writing newcomer Yedoye Travis.

Contributing artists include Cian Tormey, Giannis Milonogiannis, Karl Mostert, Max Dunbar, Dike Ruan, Belén Ortega, and Nina Vakueva.

The series debut issue features a dynamic cover by Robertson, with a card stock variant cover by David Marquez, 1:25 ratio variant cover by Riccardo Federici, and a special “teams” variant cover by Francesco Francavilla available to retailers ordering more than 250 copies. At the series digital launch on March 28, each digital chapter sells for $.99 on all participating digital platforms. Each 32-page monthly issue sells for $3.99, with the card stock variant priced at $4.99.

Review: Space Bastards #2

Space Bastards #2

Space Bastards #2 is offensive. Really offensive. It’s also at times really funny and over the top. It’s a comic that’s self-aware and runs with it all. The issue takes us back a bit revealing how Roy Sharpton built the Intergalactic Postal Service. It involves really bad stereotypes of Native Americans/First Nations and some pretty over the top abuse of workers.

Written by Eric Peterson and Joe Aubrey, Space Bastards #2 is an origin story in a way. It doesn’t really progress the first issue instead of taking us back to the beginning. Sharpton is a failed businessman and over the top annoying. He’s a person you can’t help but hate for a long list of reasons. Having been sold a failing business we see how Sharpton took the steps to rebuild the company to make it what it is. We’re also delivered hints as to what issues are coming down the road.

The comic is offensive in so many ways. Sharpton randomly yells out so many bad stereotypes and eventually forces his employees to dress in as offensive ways. Luckily things are called out a bit and it’s pointed out how obnoxious the character. Like the first issue, Space Bastards #2 seems to go over the top with everything. The first issue was violence. The second issue is how many offensive stereotypes can be crammed in.

But, the issue also begins to pivot things in a way. Where I thought we were just getting a series about these crazy postal staffers, it looks like the series will be something more and else.

Darick Robertson provides the art with Diego Rodriguez on color and Simon Bowland handle the lettering. Like the first issue, the art is fantastic. The bring such energy and life to the series. It’s over the top and the art is right there like a Looney Tunes cartoon. Scenes just make you laugh in the situations and the character designs. But, it’s a laughter of “oh shit” in how offensive it can be. There’s something there though and I found myself laughing, a lot.

Space Bastards #2 is another solid issue. It’s going to piss people off but it knows it’s being offensive and delivers it all in a way that it’s not meant in a serious manner. We’re supposed to think Sharpton is an asshole and wince at what he does. There’s an over the top nature of it all that it’s hard to take it too seriously and not see the second issue as an extension of the gonzo first.

Story: Eric Peterson, Joe Aubrey Art: Darick Robertson
Color: Diego Rodriguez Letterer: Simon Bowland
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Humanoids provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyZeus Comics

Review: Sympathy For No Devils #4

The world’s largest Colossal has been murdered and Winston Wallis-the last human in a world of monsters-has been called in to solve it.

Sympathy For No Devils #4 teases out the reality of what’s going on as some truths come out.

Story: Brandon Thomas
Art: Lee Ferguson
Color: Jose Villarrubia
Letterer: Simon Bowland

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics
TFAW

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Skeletons From My Stack: Goddess Mode

Goddess Mode

Welcome to another edition of Skeletons from my Stack. A review series wherein I finally get around to reading graphic novels that have been sitting on the “to-be-read” stack on my nightstand for far too long. Thanks to a three day holiday weekend, I finally had a chance to read Goddess Mode. This limited series, written by Zoë Quinn and drawn by Robbi Rodriguez, was on my radar well before the first issue hit stands. Unfortunately, with all the other comics I was reading, I couldn’t afford to buy it in single issues. At the time, and outside of my review projects, I read titles by DC Comics exclusively, and as excited as I was for this unique series, I had no choice but to wait for the trade paperback. Meanwhile, the pandemic occurred and shutdown comic book production and shipments. Once things started to open back up, there was still a lull between my comic book store reopening and Diamond resuming shipments. Making the most out of a bad situation, I was finally able to purchase a copy of the Goddess Mode trade paperback from my local comic book shop.

Goddess Mode takes place half in the real world and half in the completely digital world of Azoth. In the technological realm of Azoth, science meets magic as Oracles battle against Daemons. Oracles, people whose minds have been dragged into Azoth, possess abilities unique to themselves. In order to escape from Azoth, an Oracle must defeat a Daemon, the dark pieces of corrupt code that feed on human suffering. The trade paperback starts with two pages that present the background details I just described in a clever play on a FAQ web page. Unfortunately, this section may have been misplaced. The beginning of this comic not only has really slow pacing but has little to do with the info provided on the first two pages. Further, many of the pieces of information that are mentioned in the opening FAQ are then restated in the first dozen dialogue-heavy pages.

“IF THEY WANT TO BE RELENTLESS, WE CAN BE DAUNTLESS”

The pace picks up soon after, though the book continues to be dialogue heavy. Quinn uses her wordy script to explore her characters. The amount of character development she manages, while still moving the plot forward and sprinkling in elements of mystery, is quite impressive. The Oracles were my favorite part of this mini-series. Unfortunately, by the end of the book, the Oracles don’t get the treatment they deserved. I found the climax to be very confusing. I re-read the last two issues twice, and I still can’t adequately explain the story’s true central conflict, the answer to the overarching mystery, or the Oracles’ true role in Azoth.

I love the contrast of colors between digital Azoth and the analog real world. The neon bright colors Rico Renzi uses for Azoth pop off the page. I also loved Robbi Rodriguez’s character designs. Every Oracle is unique and has their own distinct attitude that’s obvious just from the way they’re drawn. I got the best kind of cyberpunk Sailor Moon vibe (minus the matching school girl outfits) from the Oracles as I read through the book. Simon Bowland is due commemoration for his lettering skills. He not only has to fit a lot of dialogue into most panels, but has to do it across multiple fonts and formats. I do wish the action scenes were drawn a little clearer, specifically the Oracles using their special powers. Most of the fights wind up being talking heads and blurred bodies. When the Oracles use their powers, it’s not always obvious which one’s abilities are manifesting. Other times they use their powers in the background of a panel and the details become so small that it’s hard to tell what’s going on.

“WHEN LIFE IS DOING ITS DAMNDEST TO KILL YOU, EVERY DAY YOU SURVIVE IS A VICTORY.”

Goddess Mode’s story is entertaining but it struggles tonally. Quinn never really finds a balance between elements of mystery and action/adventure. The character development is great but the story itself winds up being confusing. The characters look great when they’re standing still but the visual quality and clarity declines when they’re drawn in motion. Luckily, the colors and lettering keep panels looking interesting even when it becomes hard to tell what’s going on. All in all, I’m glad I finally got around to reading this Skeleton from my Stack, but I don’t think I’d ever choose to read Goddess Mode a second time.

Story: Zoë Quinn Art: Robbi Rodriguez
Colors: Rico Renzi Letterer: Simon Bowland
Story: 3.5 Art: 5.0 Overall: 4.3


Purchase: comiXology AmazonKindleZeus Comics

Review: Lonely Receiver #5

Lonely Receiver #5 ends Catrin Vander’s journey of discovery.

Story: Zac Thompson
Art: Jen Hickman
Letterer: Simon Bowland

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Exclusive Preview: Sympathy For No Devils #4

Sympathy For No Devils #4

Writer: Brandon Thomas
Artist: Lee Ferguson
Colorist: Jose Villarrubia
Letterer: Simon Bowland
Cover: Lee Ferguson w/ Jose Villarrubia
$3.99 / 32 pages / Color / On sale 1.27.21

Winston Wallis – the last human in a world of monsters – has an uncanny amount of good luck. Conspiracy surrounds him as he rushes to solve the murder of an innocent man…er, uh, monster.

Sympathy For No Devils #4

Review: Sympathy For No Devils #3

The world’s largest Colossal has been murdered and Winston Wallis-the last human in a world of monsters-has been called in to solve it.

Sympathy For No Devils #3 pivots a bit focusing more on the crime and the traditional corrupt cop/noir genre than the world building.

Story: Brandon Thomas
Art: Lee Ferguson
Color: Jose Villarrubia
Letterer: Simon Bowland

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

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