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Preview: Action Comics #1035

Action Comics #1035

Written by: Sean Lewis, Phillip Kennedy Johnson
Art by: Sami Basri, Adriana Melo, Daniel Sampere

Superman keeps the abandoned Warworld weapon out of the hands of anyone who might misuse it. But now the Justice League questions his judgment. It’s time for Clark Kent to put up or shut up. In “Tales of Metropolis,” the Guardian comes to the city. Is this another step toward Future State?

Action Comics #1035

Preview: Green Lantern 2021 Annual #1

Green Lantern 2021 Annual #1

Written by: Ryan Cady
Art by: Sami Basri

Once an agoraphobic scared to even leave her room, Jessica Cruz overcame her fear to become a Green Lantern and face the darkest and deadliest threats in the universe. But now, Jessica’s gone from overcoming fear to using it as a weapon. When Yellow Lanterns attacked the Green Lantern Sector House she took refuge in when the Central Power battery was destroyed, Jessica turned the tables on them, giving them something to be afraid of, as she beat them one-by-one. But now that she’s been offered a place in the Sinestro Corps, will she accept?

Green Lantern 2021 Annual #1

Preview: Superman #32

Superman #32

Written by: Sean Lewis, Phillip Kennedy Johnson
Art by: Sami Basri, Scott Godlewski

The end of “The One Who Fell”! Superman and Superboy were duped by the old divide-and-conquer routine, which is especially dangerous on a faraway planet where you can’t tell who your enemy is. As the Shadowbreed makes their big move, Superman discovers what happened to the friend who originally sent the distress beacon that lured him and his son across the galaxy. Let’s just hope it’s not an answer that came too late! Elsewhere, back home on Earth, Jimmy Olsen leads his misfit team on the hunt for the sinister Projectress.

Superman #32

Preview: Superman #31

Superman #31

Written by: Sean Lewis, Phillip Kennedy Johnson
Art by: Sami Basri, Scott Godlewski

“The One Who Fell” part two! Thought to have been defeated long ago by Superman and his allies, the ancient Shadowbreed have returned in a horrifying new form, and Superman’s oldest ally has been assimilated into their ranks. As Jon and the besieged new Thakkramite leader search for the key that will help them defeat the creatures, Superman returns to the site of his first historic victory over the Shadowbreed in an attempt to warn the Thakkramites of the incoming threat. But Superman’s old allies kept terrible secrets from him, and both he and Jon are more vulnerable against the Shadowbreed than they know. And in the backup story, Jimmy Olsen’s plan to build a backup squad to help out his pal Superman looks like it’s already falling apart when two of its members, Loose Cannon and Gangbuster, would rather fight than be friends.

Superman #31

Preview: Superman #30

Superman #30

Written by: Sean Lewis, Phillip Kennedy Johnson
Art by: Sami Basri, Scott Godlewski

Superman has received a signal from distant space. An old friend is in deep trouble, and only the Man of Steel can help him. By the time Superman and his son get there, though, the alien who sent the signal is nowhere to be found, and his people appear to be enthralled by a shamanistic storyteller who warns of an ancient grudge with the malevolent Shadowbreed. This leaves Clark and Jonathan Kent to ponder just who sent them the distress message, but before they can find the answer, they’ll discover that an ancient grudge still has very current consequences. Kicking off a new story line, this issue pairs Phillip Kennedy Johnson with his Future State: Superman: House of El collaborator, artist Scott Godlewski! Meanwhile, in the “Tales of Metropolis” backup story it’s…the return of Ambush Bug? Say it ain’t so!

Superman #30

DC Reveals New Details for DC Festival of Heroes: The Asian Superhero Celebration

DC Festival of Heroes: The Asian Superhero Celebration, is an incredible anthology spotlighting DC’s past, present and even future Asian superheroes, featuring some of the most dynamic Asian storytellers in and out of comics. Featuring an incredible cover by the team of DC Publisher and Chief Creative Officer Jim Lee, and colorist Alex Sinclair, this anthology includes a foreword by activist and CNN and WSJ Online contributor Jeff Yang, a selection of tribute pinups of DC’s Asian superheroes, plus an awesome variant cover featuring Cassandra Cain by artist Stanley “Artgerm” Lau.

A New Hero: Monkey Prince!
DC Festival of Heroes will treat readers to the first appearance of an all-new character, the Monkey Prince. Debuting in a story written by award-winning writer Gene Luen Yang (Superman Smashes the Klan, Batman/Superman, New Super-Man) with art by Bernard Chang (Teen Titans, Batman Beyond), Monkey Prince is inspired by the Monkey King, legendary hero of Chinese mythology and the classic tale Journey to the West. In Yang and Chang’s original 12-page story, “The Monkey Prince Hates Superheroes,” Monkey Prince battles and teams up with Shazam to defeat both the evil Dr. Sivana and a Chinese deer demon spirit! To further celebrate this new superhero, the anthology will receive a special Monkey Prince 1 in 25 variant cover by Bernard Chang (check local comic book stores for availability).

Additional stories include:
“Masks” – Ram V, writer of CatwomanJustice League Dark, and The Swamp Thing, teams up with Audrey Mok, the artist of Sera and the Royal Stars, to tell a story featuring Jade Nguyen, a.k.a. Cheshire. Tying into V’s Catwoman run, Selina Kyle’s protégé Shoes has visions of being rescued as a child by Cheshire. Shoes takes these visions as a sign, donning a mask, taking the name “Cheshire Cat,” and asking Selina Kyle to train her. But is Catwoman ready to take on a sidekick?

“Sounds” – Detective Comics writer and Eisner Award winner Mariko Tamaki (Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass) and artist Marcus To team up to tell a story featuring Cassandra Cain, a.k.a. Batgirl. Batgirl struggles to understand words, but with her ability to read body language and uncanny fighting skills, she really doesn’t have to…until she meets someone and wishes that she had the right words—ANY words—to say to them!

“What’s in the Box?” – Cassandra Cain steps into the spotlight once more, but this time with Colin Wilkes, a.k.a. Abuse (who first appeared in Detective Comics #947, October 2008), courtesy of words and art by Dustin Nguyen. Abuse finds Batgirl sitting by a bridge, upset by a comment made by Damian Wayne.

“Dress Code” – Green Lantern Tai Pham makes his first comic book debut in this story by Green Lantern: Legacy writer Minh Lê with artist Trung Le Nguyen. Green Lantern is fighting with Arkillo, and the villain taunts him for his costume “looking like a dress.” This reminds Tai of a memory with his dead grandmother who he inherited his powers from.

“Festival of Heroes” – In a story by writer Amy Chu and artist Marcio Takara influenced by current headlines, Katana, Cyborg, and Blue Beetle (Jaime Reyes) are asked to safeguard an Asian American and Pacific Islander community celebration against potential violence from a white supremacist group. But the heroes are quickly reminded that you don’t need capes, masks, or even special abilities to be a hero.

“Hawke & Kong” – Writer Greg Pak and artist Sumit Kumar team up on a story spotlighting the return of onetime Green Arrow Connor Hawke and Kong Kenan, also known as New Super-Man. Connor and Kenan need to do some quick thinking when a gift for Connor’s Korean aunt gets damaged in a battle with a dragon!

“Special Delivery” – Master of None writer Aniz Ansari makes his comic book debut with artist Sami Basri in this story featuring Robin (Damian Wayne). As Robin ponders about his heritage, he slowly discovers that something about this pizza place seems off…

“Kawaii Kalamity!” – Shadow of the Batgirl writer Sarah Kuhn and illustrator Victoria Ying (Diana: Princess of the Amazons) tell a story about Red Arrow’s reluctance of enjoying “kawaii” things because of people’s general assumptions of what she likes simply based on her Japanese heritage.

“Family Dinner” – Amazon juggernaut Grace Choi has to meet her girlfriend Anissa Pierce’s dad for dinner. But when your girlfriend is Thunder, that means meeting the parents is that much more stressful because her father is Black Lightning!

“Perceptible” – The Good Asian duo of Pornsak Pichetshote (writer) and Alexandre Tefenkgi (artist) tell a tale featuring The Atom (Ryan Choi) trying to defeat a microscopic robot sent from the future…to save our reality as we know it!

This 100-page commemorative anthology is a great way to celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, awesome storytelling, and DC’s Super Heroes when it arrives in comic book stores and on participating digital platforms on Tuesday, May 11, 2021.

Preview: Superman #29

Superman #29

Written by: Sean Lewis, Phillip Kennedy Johnson
Art by: Sami Basri, Phil Hester

Writer Phillip Kennedy Johnson jumps from DC Future State back to the present for a two-part story that spans Superman and Action Comics this month! In “The Golden Age,” Jonathan Kent steps back to examine his father’s legacy. When a monstrous foe from outer space attacks Clark—and nearly kills him!—this young hero must consider the fact that his father died once before, and the Legion of Super-Heroes told him he could die again. Any threat could be the one—including this one! And in the new backup “Tales of Metropolis” story, writer Sean Lewis (DC Future State: Superman of Metropolis) and artist Sami Basri (Harley Quinn) follow Jimmy Olsen on a quest to meet of some of the city’s more colorful denizens, beginning with Bibbo Bibbowski!

Superman #29

Review: Future State: Green Lantern #1

Future State: Green Lantern #1

Future State has been delivering a fascinating look at possible futures of the DC Universe. While some have provided pretty smooth transitions, others have left too many questions. The world these comics exist in themselves are a distraction. Future State: Green Lantern #1 is one of those issues. In this future, the Green Lantern battery appears to be no more, and the Lanterns a shell of what they were. Why? Who knows. But, it’s a question that’ll be in the back of your head while you read the comic.

Geoffrey Thorne delivers an interesting story of a siege and last stand. John Stewart is leading a band of Lanterns as they protect a planet under siege. Their goal is to get survivors off the planet and slow the tide of attack. Coming out so soon after the events of January 6, it’s an odd comic as it’s hard to read it and not think of the officers who stood against the attacking crowds.

Thorne gives us a valiant issue. Future State: Green Lantern #1 presents the Lanterns as heroes who put their own lives on the line even when the odds are against them. There’s no fancy rings to wield, it’s just guns and swords to hold off the evil they face. And, some give their lives in doing so. Thorne delivers emotion and trauma as the odds diminish and you’re left not knowing if Stewart and team will walk away.

I sort of like Tom Raney’s art. With color by Mike Atiyeh and lettering by Andworld Design, it’s more of a personal thing for me. There’s a slight cartoonish style to the comic that doesn’t quite click for me. But there’s some great moments and I really like the design of the characters. Raney gives us the emotional hits and a good look at Stewart’s reactions. But, the art doesn’t quite click with the drama. As a sci-fi comic, the style works really well but here it doesn’t nail the emotional moments.

The comic features a second tale, “The Taking of Sector 0123“. Written by Ryan Cady with art by Sami Basri, colors by Hi-Fi, and lettering by Dave Sharpe, it’s a solid story featuring Jessica Cruz. Some of Sinestro’s Yellow Lantern Corp have headed to a Green Lantern station with an intention of taking it over. All that’s left to stop them is Cruz without her power ring. What takes place is a story we’ve seen many times before. It’s Die Hard and numerous other films of that sort but it works. It works really well. That ending though! It’s the strongest of the three stories within.

The third story, “Book of Guy“, is really humorous as Guy Gardner is stuck on a world after his Ring’s power gives out. Written by Ernie Altabacker with art by Clayton Henry, color by Marcelo Maiolo, and lettering by Steve Wands, the story is entertaining and cute, a solid back-up story. It’s funny and definitely had me laughing by the end.

Future State: Green Lantern #1 isn’t a bad issue at all but it dances the history of the DC Universe up to this point. It’s hard to not keep wondering what problem hit the Green Lanterns. Why are things like the way they are. It left me wanting to learn about that more than what was presented. That’s good in a way but also a bit frustrating as well.

Story: Geoffrey Thorne, Ryan Cady, Ernie Altabacker Art: Tom Raney, Sami Basri, Clayton Henry
Color: Mike Atiyeh, Hi-Fi, Marcelo Maiolo Letterer: Andworld Design, Dave Sharpe, Steve Wands
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Preview: Future State: Green Lantern #1

Future State: Green Lantern #1

Written by: Ryan Cady, Ernie Altbacker, Geoffrey Thorne
Art by: Clayton Henry, Tom Raney, Sami Basri

Assigned to map and contact new lifeforms past the 3,600 known sectors of space protected by the Green Lantern Corps, John Stewart and an elite team of Lanterns are trapped behind enemy lines and fighting for their lives when the Central Power Battery goes dark and leaves the entire corps defenseless. Meanwhile, across the cosmos, Green Lantern Jessica Cruz finds herself powerless and forced to battle the invading Yellow Lanterns of the Sinestro Corps, and Guy Gardner, trapped on distant world, decides to reopen Warriors Bar.

Future State: Green Lantern #1

Phillip Kennedy Johnson, Phil Hester, and Eric Gapstur Strap on the Tights for Superman in March 2021

Writer Phillip Kennedy Johnson flies from DC’s Future State event in January and February back to the present DCU in March to join artists Phil Hester and Eric Gapstur for a two-part story that spans both Superman and Action Comics!

In “The Golden Age” part one on March 9 (Superman #29), Jonathan Kent is back from the 31st Century and fighting cosmic threats alongside his legendary father. But when an interdimensional breach opens near Earth, Jon recognizes the creatures that emerge: the cosmic leviathans that the Legion of Superheroes credit with the DEATH OF SUPERMAN!

And in the new backup series “Tales of Metropolis” story in the same issue, writer Sean Lewis and artist Sami Basri follow Jimmy Olsen on a quest to meet of some of the city’s more colorful denizens, beginning with Bibbo Bibbowski!

Then in “The Golden Age” part two on March 24 (Action Comics #1029), as Superboy desperately tries to save Superman’s life from the leviathans of the Breach, Superman discovers the Breach’s shocking origins. But with his powers mysteriously fading, he is utterly outmatched. Can Superboy change the course of history and save his father’s life? Don’t miss this prelude to DC’s MASSIVE Superman event!

Plus, in another all-new backup “Tale of Metropolis” story, writers Becky Cloonan and Michael W. Conrad join forces with Michael Avon Oeming to continue the Midnighter story that Cloonan and Conrad started in DC Future State. But is the DC Universe ready for Trojan Industries?

In the months following “The Golden Age” two-part crossover, Phillip Kennedy Johnson will continue writing both Superman and Action Comics with artists Scott Godlewski (on Superman) and Daniel Sampere (on Action Comics) before reuniting with Future State: Superman: Worlds of War co-creator Mikel Janín on a special Superman project—still to be announced!

Almost American
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