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Exclusive: Read “Moments to Remember” from Captain Ginger #4, Out January 16

In 2018, AHOY Comics told us to expect more from our comics and they delivered with a new line that not only delivered fantastic comics but packed each issue with back-up comics, prose, and more.

We have an exclusive of “Moments to Remember” by Audrey Ryer with art by Ryan Kelly that appears in Captain Ginger #4, out January 16th.

Captain Ginger #4 features a main comic written by Stuart Moore, art by June Brigman, color by Veronica Gandini, and lettering by Richard Starkings and Jimmy Betancourt. There’s also a back-up comic, “Hastag: Danger Wipe the Blood Off My Name!” written by Tom Peyer, art by Randy Elliott, color by Andy Troy, and lettering by Rob Steen.

Read the short story below, get the comic this coming Wednesday, and in 2019 expect more from your comics!

Review: The Wrong Earth #5

On Earth-Alpha, sidekick Stinger loses faith in the grim Dragonfly as villains take control of their secret crime-fighting headquarters! On Earth-Omega, Dragonflyman befriends a member of the murderous Number One’s gang!

The Wrong Earth is one of the best comics out there right now and one of the best superhero comics.

Writer Tom Peyer continues the fantastic multiple world story he has created in The Wrong Earth #5 and uses it to explore different facets of the same character (from multiple Earths). What Peyer brilliantly is able to do is create a comic that’s a spoof, an homage, and just straight superhero adventure all at the same time. You can read it any way you want and no matter what, it’s still enjoyable. There’s a multi-level approach to it all.

In this issue on one Earth the destruction of the portal between worlds is dealt with resulting in something that’s rather unexpected. What’s also interesting is the exploration of the relationship between hero and villain. In this case what if you take a gritty modern hero and have their rogues be the more comical ones from the 60s. Wouldn’t those classic villains look like a joke? Did they then? There’s an interesting exploration of that and at the same time the gritty character too. Peyer feels like he’s making a statement about both comic eras and has concluded they’re both a bit silly.

We see that in the gritty world where the more innocent Dragonfly has come to the conclusion he should still stick to his ideals no matter how messed up the world is. But, there’s a bit of movement in those ideals and the conclusion seems to be there’s a happy middle. Go to the extreme on either end and things get rather comical and silly.

Peyer is joined by Jamal Igle on art, Juan Castro on ink, Andy Troy on color, and Rob Steen on lettering. I say this every issue but the team’s ability to take two very different styles and bring them together is impressive. It’s seamless and looks perfectly natural. What’s interesting is in this issue, those two styles have blended together a bit more as if to say that Peyer’s middle is the best route. Art and story seem to have the same focus.

That story alone would be worth picking this issue up.

Writer Paul Constant, Gary Erskine on art, Andy Troy on color, and Steen lettering deliver a back-up story focused on Dragonfly as he fights a nanite infuse bad guy. It’s the first back-up to be a multi-parter and not only is it solid it also adds in some history, as these back-ups all have. It’s an awesome bonus to an already great issue.

But there’s more!

There’s two prose articles, one by Matt Brady with art by Joe Orsak and another by Robert Jeschonek with art by Elliott Mattice and both are interesting reads. They’re the bonus that makes it feel like you’re really getting something for your dollar.

This is another great issue that delivers the more we should expect. The series has been entertaining and the fact you get so much more for your money makes it feel like even more of a deal and good value. AHOY is the company to watch out for in 2019 as they continue to show why they were the best of 2018.

Story: Tom Peyer, Paul Constant, Matt Brady, Robert Jeschonek
Art: Jamal Igle, Gary Erskine, Joe Orsak, Elliott Mattice
Color: Andy Troy Lettering: Rob Steen
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.75 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

AHOY Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Wrong Earth #4

On one Earth, the Dastardly League lays a lethal trap for Dragonfly! On the other, a disguised Dragonflyman infiltrates a dangerous criminal haunt! Plus, To save a group of missing teens, Dragonfly must beat up the Internet! And, prose and pictures by the multiverse’s most imaginative minds!

Ever want to see Harley Quinn punch out the Joker, standing up for herself, and prove she’s the better? The Wrong Earth #4 delivers that in a way with their homage characters. Writer Tom Peyer delivers another installment full of action as the two heroes deal with their being stranded on the wrong Earth but doing what they know, attempting to fight crime.

The Wrong Earth has been a fantastic ride so far on so many levels. The series continues to stand on its own with unique takes and interesting characters and settings. There’s also a level that takes the series as an homage to comics and a love letter to its history. Then there’s also a bit of it that’s a spoof and parody of that history as well. The fact the comic can work on all three levels is impressive.

Part of that is due to the art by Jamal Igle with ink by Juan Castro, color by Andy Troy, and lettering by Rob Steen. Igle packs in so many gags and winks and nods into this issue that it feels like that alone is an “extra” of the comic. There’s two different moments where the comic is filled with villains that’ll leave you lingering on the pages to figure out who everyone is.

The team have put together another fantastic issue that seamlessly blends both a classic and modern comic vibe into a series in both tone and look and does so at a level that it works. Easily one of the best comics out this year.

And, that’d be worth the price of the comic alone but there’s more!

The issue also features a solo Dragonfly comic written by Paul Constant with art by Gary Erskine, colors by Andy Troy, and lettering by Rob Steen. The there’s three prose entries, one by writer Kek-W and illustrated by Carol Lay, another by writer Matt Brady and illustrated by Joe Orsak and the final written and illustrated by Carol Lay. All of this is bonus material. As I said, the main story alone is worth the price of the comic but AHOY Comics are all about expecting more and once again, they deliver.

Another fantastic issue of the series and another fantastic comic from AHOY Comics who has become a publisher that is standing out from the crowd and delivering some of the best value for your dollars.

Story: Tom Peyer, Paul Constant, Kek-W, Matt Brady, Carol Lay
Art: Jamal Igle, Gary Erskine, Carol Lay, Joe Orsak
Color: Andy Troy Lettering: Rob Steen
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

AHOY Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Wrong Earth #3

The grim vigilante Dragonfly violently crosses a line, shocking the upright citizens of Earth-Alpha. Meanwhile, the campy Dragonflyman succumbs to the pressures of confinement on gritty Earth-Omega. Plus, Stinger investigates the supernatural mystery of the Specter of the Sidekick Museum.

The Wrong Earth has gone three for three in excellence with another issue that’s top notch entertainment. Two versions of the same hero on two Earth’s, the series again perfectly balances being an homage and send up of the comics before it.

On one Earth is Dragonfly, the vigilante hero on an Earth that’s more innocent and his actions are so over the top, it’ll make you laugh. Writer Tom Peyer pulls off this sort of moment in a way that is enjoyable, funny, serious, it just pulls all of that off at the same time. The opposite of that situation is Dragonflyman which is the more family friendly hero stuck in a gritty 80s/90s world and we get to see what that might do to the character.

Peyer does the impressive thing creating a story that perfectly balances every aspect of itself. It can be a send-up/spoof. It can be an homage. It can just be enjoyed. It can be all of the above. The comic is so layered and done in a way where you can pick and choose why you enjoy it. Add in moments like the opening with the trial of Ms. Deuce and it’s hard to not enjoy the series as it bathes in tropes and comic history.

Then you take the art by Jamal Igle with ink by Juan Castro, coloring by Andy Troy, and lettering by Rob Steen and it all becomes more impressive as the styles of the two worlds are clear. They’re done in the “style” for that period of comic history and for one creative team to go back and forth between the two so easily is impressive.

Peyer and Igle have taken whats come before and remixed it in a way were it’s both new and familiar. And with that it continues to shine as an amazing read.

And that’d be enough, but there’s more!

Writer Paul Constant and artist Frank Cammuso give us an adventure featuring Stinger. The story is a throwback in many ways and the art can only be described as amazing in not just what’s presented but the entire design which has an aged look to it all.

But again, there’s more!

Writers Matt Brady, Rob Staeger, and Carol Lay each contribute prose writings with art by Joe Orsak, Elliott Mattice, and Lay, all of which is entertaining and just adds to the “value” of it all.

Again, AHOY Comics and the team on this comic has delivered entertainment from start to finish. It again shows we should expect more from our comics and AHOY is again making the case that they should be the publisher of the year and this is one of the best monthly comics being put out right now.

Story: Tom Peyer, Paul Constant, Matt Brady, Rob Staeger, and Carol Lay
Art: Jamal Igle, Frank Cammuso, Joe Orsak, Elliott Mattice, Carol Lay

Ink: Juan Castro Color: Andy Troy, Frank Cammuso Lettering: Rob Steen, Frank Cammuso
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

AHOY Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: High Heaven #2

What’s worse than being sentenced to Hell? For self-pitying David Feathers, it’s an eternity in Paradise, where he runs afoul of a monstrous angel.

Well that’s unexpected. The first issue of High Heaven was a nice send-up of those person goes to Heaven types of stories giving us a miserable lead and a Heaven that reminds us more of Eastern Europe under Communism. Writer Tom Peyer peels back the clouds in High Heaven #2 to reveal those things that didn’t quite seem right in the first issue. Heaven? Yeah, there’s more to it.

David Feathers is still a miserable lead but the second issue shows there’s some truth to his kvetching. Heaven as presented to him does suck but it’s not like he deserves what’s revealed. The world as presented is an interesting one with clear class delineations and austerity has hit where David has been placed. Is there better? Is there worse? Well, we now know the answer to that and that there is indeed some place to escape to.

What’s interesting is the theme of being happy with what you’re given and how we should shut up about it. Even in Heaven this seems to exist and makes for an interesting debate about the meaning of it all and theological implications.

The art by Greg Scott with color by Andy Troy and lettering by Rob Steen is really solid. There’s some big jumps in locations in this issue and some very different designs and feels to some characters but the team makes it all work and flow easily as one world. There’s nothing that seems out of place. It all is rather quick but each panel of what’s revealed had me linger to see what details I could see that adds to the world and story.

That’d be enough to make this a buy….

The surly science-heroes of Hashtag: Danger adopt an alien pet! Yes, there’s a backup comic too also written by Peyer with art by Chris Giarrusso. It’s a twisted story that had me laughing and the weirdness of it all betrays Giarrusso’s style. Think, a real messed up Archie and you get a better idea of what’s presented.

And that’s not all!

There’s prose and Q&As from Carol Lay, Hart Seely, Kek-W, Austin Wilson, and featuring art by Lay, Rick Geary, and Elliott Mattice. All of it is bonus to what’s already a great issue of comics.

It’s another solid issue that feels like it’s even better than the first and has me super excited to see what’s next. AHOY Comics has something special here not just delivering solid main stories but packing so much into each issue that they really feel like you’re getting your money’s worth. Another must get from this upstart publisher.

Story: Tom Peyer, Carol Lay, Hart Seely, Kek-W, Austin Wilson
Art: Greg Scott, Chris Giarrusso, Carol Lay, Rick Geary, Elliott Mattice

Color: Andy Troy Lettering: Rob Steen
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

AHOY Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Wrong Earth #2

The saga of two world-swapped heroes continues! On gritty Earth-Omega, the cheerful Dragonflyman faces off against corrupt, violent police. Meanwhile, the naïve authorities of colorful Earth-Alpha enrage the grim Dragonfly.

I gushed over The Wrong Earth #1, the debut comic from AHOY Comics and the second issue is just as good diving deeper into its exciting world. The Wrong Earth #2 is both a spoof and homage of comics, a brilliant balancing act that’s impressive and I’d imagine hard to do. Writer Tom Peyer nails the mix as we bounce between the two worlds and two different heroes.

It’s hard to really praise the writing in this series. What’s pulled off is utterly brilliant. While the concept of taking a modern “grim and gritty” hero and placing them in an innocent world and vice versa might sound simple, being able to get the tones of it all right isn’t. Each interaction you have characters whose tone and vibes are opposite. You have situations and characters that clash. Yet, this flows perfectly.

Peyer also is able to balance both lovingly playing with and poking fun at the concept. You can spoof it and just go over the top making fun of comics past and present. You can play it for straight and put forward what you think is the best of both eras. But this series in its two issues does both. Characters will remind you of other comics and the beats do too. It takes that seriously playing up a loving kiss to it all. But, it does it in such an over the top way at times it’s hard to not see it as an entertaining goof too.

The art by Jamal Igle with ink by Juan Castro, color by Andy Troy, and lettering by Rob Steen is on point. Igle and the team perfectly nail the styles of the two eras. It would be expected for a series to employ two artistic teams to pull off what Igle, Castro, and Troy do, but the trio pull off the amazing by bouncing between the eras in a way that each character continues their innocent or gritty in the opposite world. What’s more impressive is nothing seems completely out of place, it still works visually. The details too in the art add to the story allowing the reader to understand more about each hero and how they differ.

All of that alone would merit a 10 out of 10 across the board, but with AHOY you should expect more!

In this issue’s back-up comic story, Dragonflyman and Stinger confront the dastardly menace called NIMBY! Writer Paul Constant, artist Tom Feister, and letterer Rob Steen deliver a second comic featuring the heroes and it has the fun innocence playing off of comics of the time. Of course there’s winks and nods and it’s just a fun bonus to read.

And that’s not all… it’s an AHOY comic, we’re getting more.

The comic features prose writing and instructions to microwave a meal featuring the writing of Kek-W, Bryce Ingman, and Mark Russell, and art by Carol Lay, Alan Robinson, and Joe Orsak. It’s all solid and honestly seeing as how I loved this comic for the main story, this is all bonus and it’s entertaining bonus material. The comic for me is the draw and the rest is extras that only add to the value of it all.

The first issue was fantastic, the second is just as amazing. AHOY Comics launched and told us to expect more from comics and in two issues they have me doing exactly that. This comic would be worth the price for the main story alone but then there’s a second comic, plus prose stories, and it’s all good. This is seriously some of your best value for your money when it comes to comics and this publisher is at another level.

Story: Tom Peyer, Paul Constant Kek-W, Bryce Ingman, Mark Russell
Art: Jamal Igle, Tom Feister, Carol Lay, Alan Robinson
Ink: Juan Castro Color: Andy Troy Letterer: Rob Steen
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

AHOY Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

NYCC 2018: AfterShock Announces Out of the Blue, their Next Graphic Novel from Garth Ennis and Keith Burns

At their New York Comic Con panel, AfterShock announced a brand new graphic novel, Out of the Blue. Written by Garth Ennis with art by Keith Burns, Out of the Blue is a brand new war comic story from Ennis.

The Second World War is almost over, but no one seems to have told the Germans- as Royal Air Force pilot Jamie McKenzie finds out when he’s assigned to deadly shipping strikes along the enemy coast. Flying the Mosquito fighter-bomber against heavily armed targets is dangerous enough at the best of times, but after incurring the wrath of his vengeful commanding officer, Jamie is assigned the most unpopular navigator in the unit- not to mention the least reliable aircraft. Worse still, the commander’s sights are firmly set on Jamie’s beautiful young wife, Beth.

Ennis and artist Burns re-unite after the success of their series Johnny Red, presenting another tale of World War Two aerial combat- featuring skies black with flak and enemy fighters, nail-biting low-level action, and the dark humor of men whose lives can be snatched away at any second… Out of the Blue.

Out of the Blue features colors by Jason Wordie, lettering by Rob Steen, and a cover by Burns. The 72 page graphic novel will retail for $19.99 and be released March 2019.

Review: The Wrong Earth #1

On one world, Dragonflyman and his sidekick Stinger enjoy a life of adventure. On another Earth, the Dragonfly hunts criminal parasites like a lethal exterminator. But what happens when these two heroes change places?

AHOY Comics launches their imprint with this superhero series which is as much a spoof as it is a serious take on the genre. The concept of the multiverse is popular in comics and this series is running with that with a concept like we’ve seen before, but I couldn’t tell you exactly where.

The Wrong Earth #1 has two Earths where one superhero is the classic positive one that works with the police and their counterpart on another Earth is the gritty version who murders and is wanted by the police. The series is a fun take on the classic and modern superhero with a Freaky Friday sort of twist as the two switch places in a way.

Writer Tom Peyer nails the differing tones of the characters with ease resulting in a story that’s a send-up of comics in a way. There’s the classic story which really does feel like a golden age tale. It has the tone and interactions down perfect. The grittier version is so over the top it’s hard to not laugh in a good way. Peyer doesn’t take either seriously as both are played to extremes in their own way.

The art by Jamal Igle nails the switch down too. Each Earth and character is different in so many ways yet the basics are there. The style itself switches in a subtle way that becomes more noticeable as the two characters switch spots. It’s a great idea and really emphasizes dueling eras. All of the characters are so detailed and all will remind you of others in a way. It’s as much it’s own thing design wise as it is an homage to what has come before, similar to the concept and story.

But beyond that main story, which would be more than enough AHOY promises more from their comics. There’s a “Golden Age” solo story featuring Stinger, Dragonflyman’s sidekick. Written by Paul Constant and art by Frank Cammuso, the story has the “golly gee” vibe about itself and then you get to the end… really was expecting that twisted end.

And there’s even more! Grant Morrison provides a prose story with art by Rob Steen and a cartoon is provided by Shannon Wheeler. It all comes together to create an experience that feels jam packed and you can take on as much as you want.

AHOY promised a lot going into this debut and they have delivered a comic that feels at times more magazine than comic (in a good way). You really feel like you get a lot out of this and if this is the start, I can’t wait to see what’s next.

Story: Tom Peyer, Paul Constant, Grant Morrison, Shannon Wheeler
Art: Jamal Igle, Frank Cammuso, Rob Steen, Shannon Wheeler
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 20 Recommendation: Buy

AHOY Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Check Out These Previews of What We Can Expect From AHOY Comics

Earlier today we brought the news of the launch of AHOY Comics, a new publisher who has already announced four series with an impressive group of creators. Now, we have a look at the actual series that we’ll be able to enjoy starting in September.

THE WRONG EARTH

6 Issue mini-series by Tom Peyer and Jamal Igle

AHOY Comics launches with a biting superhero satire written by Tom Peyer (Captain Kid, Hourman), penciled by Jamal Igle (Black, Supergirl), inked by Juan Castro (Transformers),and colored by Andy Troy. On one world, Dragonflyman and his sidekick Stinger enjoy a life of adventure. On another Earth, the Dragonfly hunts criminal parasites like a lethal exterminator. But what happens when these two heroes change places?

On sale on September 12, 2018, THE WRONG EARTH debut issue is a full color, 40 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with extras including:

  • A  prose story by comics legend Grant Morrison: ‘HUD’ HORNET’S HOLIDAY IN HELL, illustrated by best-selling artist Rob Steen
  • A mock “Golden Age” Stinger solo story, by Paul Constant and Frank Cammuso
  • A cartoon by Shannon Wheeler

HIGH HEAVEN

5 Issue Mature Readers mini-series by Tom Peyer and Greg Scott

Chronic malcontent David Weathers dies and goes to Heaven—where everything is terrible, and everybody hates a complainer. HIGH HEAVEN is a savage satire by writer Tom Peyer (Hourman, Batman ’66) with art by Greg Scott (Black Hood, X-Files), colored by Andy Troy.

On sale, September 26, 2018, HIGH HEAVEN’s debut issue is a full color, 40 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with a cover by Mad Magazine’s Richard Williams and extras including:

  • A HASHTAG: DANGER backup story by Peyer, with art by Chris Giarrusso (G-Man, Mini-Marvels)
  • A cartoon by Shannon Wheeler
  • An all-new prose story by comics legend Grant Morrison: FESTIVE FUNTIMES AT THE NEW WORLD’S FAIR, illustrated by acclaimed artist Rick Geary

In October, AHOY Comics will launch a creator owned title:

CAPTAIN GINGER

4 issue mini series by Stuart Moore and June Brigman

When the human race died out, the cats inherited the Earth! Or at least one starship. Now the intrepid Captain Ginger struggles to keep his fellow felines united against a hostile universe. Thirty-five pages of comic adventure—with a bite—by writer Stuart Moore (Deadpool the Duck, Batman: Noir Alley) artist June Brigman (Power Pack), inker Roy Richardson and colorist Veronica Gandini.

On sale, October 17, 2018, CAPTAIN GINGER’s debut issue is a full color, 48 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with extras including:

  • An all-new text story by comics legend Grant Morrison: THE ELECTRIC SKY BEAR THAT INSPIRED BEN FRANKLIN, illustrated by Phil Hester
  • A cartoon by Shannon Wheeler

October will also see the debut of an all star anthology series:

EDGAR ALLAN POE’S SNIFTER OF TERROR

6 issue Mature Readers mini series

EDGAR ALLAN POE mangles classic tales and brand new stories in this cross between Drunk History and Tales from the Crypt! First, meet AHOY’s own alcohol-damaged version of Poe in The Facts in The Case of M. Valdemar, adapted by Tom Peyer (Batman ‘66) and drawn by Fred Harper. Then: Sugary cereal meets vampirism in Dark Chocolate, by writer Mark Russell (The Flintstones) and artist Peter Snejbjerg (Starman).

On sale, October 31, 2018, EDGAR ALLAN POE’S SNIFTER OF TERROR’s debut issue is a full color, 40 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with extras including:

  • Hunt Emerson’s take on The Black Cat
  • Unsettling verse by Cienna Madrid illustrated by Carly Wright

Preview: Hook Jaw

HOOK JAW

Writer: Si Spurrier
Artist: Conor Boyle
Colorist: Giulia Brusco
Letterer: Rob Steen
Publisher: Titan Comics
Hook Jaw Created By Pat Mills & Ramon Sola
FC – $16.99 – 128pp – On sale in comic stores: July 26, 2017
On sale in book stores: August 15, 2017
ISBN: 9781782768050

Hook Jaw – the nigh-on legendary great white shark that has haunted oceans and nightmares alike for decades…

As the crew of the scientific vessel the Sola enter Somalian waters to study the group of great white sharks known as the ‘Virgin Brides,’ they soon fall foul of Somalian pirates, the US military and the infamous Hook Jaw! But who is the real hero of the story?

Written by Si Spurrier and with art by Conor Boyle and Giulia Brusco, Hook Jaw revives the notorious Action comic strip created by Pat Mills and Ramon Sola that proved so controversial, it was banned!

Collects Hook Jaw issues #1 to #5.

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