Tag Archives: rob david

Preview: He-Man/Thundercats #6

He-Man/Thundercats #6

(W) Rob David, Lloyd Goldfine (A/CA) Freddie Williams II
In Shops: Mar 15, 2017
SRP: $3.99

The epic series comes to the only conclusion possible: all-out war against Mumm-Ra and Skeletor! He-Man and Lion-O confront the diabolical duo in the heart of the magical, mystical Castle Grayskull, but the battle royal quickly expands across the multiverse itself!

Preview: He-Man/Thundercats #4

He-Man/Thundercats #4

(W) Rob David, Lloyd Goldfine (A/CA) Freddie Williams II
RATED T
In Shops: Jan 18, 2017
SRP: $3.99

It’s the battle you’ve waited to see! With the Ancient Spirits of Evil ravaging Eternia, Lion-O rushes to aid the Masters of the Universe in defending their world. The only thing standing in his way is…He-Man?! The epic battle between the super-heroic 1980s icons breaks loose as the Sword of Power clashes with the Sword of Omens! This one you do not want to miss!

hmtc_cv04

Preview: He-Man/Thundercats #3

He-Man/Thundercats #3

(W) Rob David, Lloyd Goldfine (A/CA) Freddie Williams II
In Shops: Dec 21, 2016
SRP: $3.99

The ThunderCats team up to combat a new foe: Skeletor! And as young King Lion-O battles this evil from another world, he distracts Skeletor from an important fight against Mumm-Ra. With the Power of Grayskull hanging in the balance, who can possibly turn the tide of battle?

hmtc_cv03

Preview: He-Man/Thundercats #1

He-Man/Thundercats #1

Written by: Lloyd Goldfine, Rob David
Art by: Freddie E Williams II
Covers Freddie E Williams II

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe team up with the ThunderCats—the epic crossover event you’ve waited thirty years to see! In his ever-living desire to destroy the mighty ThunderCats, Mumm-Ra quests for a weapon that can rival the legendary Sword of Omens: He-Man’s Sword of Power! But his dimension-spanning scheme kick starts a cataclysmic crisis that will embroil heroes and villains—Masters, Mutants and ThunderCats—in a mind-blowing six-part saga!

hmtc_cv01a

 

He-Man and Thundercats Meet in October

It’s the epic crossover event 30 years in the making! He-Man and the Masters of the Universe team up with the ThunderCats to make comic book and pop culture history! Scheduled to debut in October and published by DC Entertainment, this monthly miniseries will embroil heroes and villains—Masters, Mutants and ThunderCats—in a mind-blowing six-part comic book saga!

The story will be brought to life by the writing team of Mattel Head Writer and Masters of the Universe Lead Creative Rob David and Supervising Producer Lloyd Goldfine, with all-star artist Freddie E. Williams II handling interiors and cover art.

In his eternal desire to destroy the mighty ThunderCats, the evil Mumm-Ra quests for a weapon that can rival the legendary Sword of Omens: He-Man’s Sword of Power! But his dimension-spanning scheme launches a cataclysmic crisis that will, for the first time ever, unite Lion-O, Cheetara, Tygra, Panthro, WilyKit and WilyKat with He-Man, Battlecat, Teela, Man-At-Arms and the rest of the Masters of the Universe.

He-Man/Thundercats #1 debuts October 5, 2016.

HeManThunderCats_promo_Freddie_E_Williams_II[1]

Review: He-Man Eternity War #8

ew008Eternity War, the latest He-Man story arc, has had some ups and downs during its series.  This is to be somewhat expected, as for every big moment, there is some time required to set it up and to build the characters into pertinent actors for the script.  The previous issue of Eternity War could be said to be one which had some big moments, although these were more like big character developments which focused around She-Ra’s and Skeletor’s past.  With these big developments right behind it, it probably left many wondering what was immediately ahead for the series.

The story is related in parts to the previous issue, but also throws in a bit of extra unexpected developments.  Adam has chosen to become depowered, and is keen on returning Eternos to his control.  Such is done by a costly victory over the forces of Hordak, the villain who clearly has bigger plans to follow as opposed to immediately stopping Adam.  This leads to the strongest dramatic point for the issue, although it is mirrored in the travels of Skeletor and She-Ra.  Skeletor has led her to the dark dimension, but he has plans of his own, not exactly in line with what he had told her in the previous issue.

While the series is still running at its best, it still feels like this issue is a bit of an intermission.  With so many new developments it is necessary to reposition the players so that they can be put into places where their true heroism can shine through.  That is what is happening here, and it feels a bit more sedate than other issues in this series, mostly because it cannot rely on any of these big moments, but instead has to get by on some other plot developments which while fun, are also a bit ordinary.  The same format has been used before in this series to set up its big moments, as for instance the mostly action second issue showed that there was still a lot of other great moments to follow.  Such would most likely be the moment here, as there are no big moments, but there promises to be in issues to come.

Story: Rob David and Dan Abnett Art: Pop Mhan
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Review: He-Man Eternity War #7

EW07The story line for He-Man comes at an interesting time in DC Comics.  Although it is a DC Comic by publishing, and not by shared universe, it nonetheless is part of a similar structure of a lot of superheroics, a superhero with a secret identity and an archetypical arch-nemesis.  While DC is trying to deconstruct two of its other main heroes, Superman and Batman, it is also doing the same with He-Man, except that with He-Man it is doing so in a way which is less of a stunt and more of an epic restructuring of the character.

Eternity War started off as much less than what it has become, in fact the first few issues, while fun, looked like a Lords of the Rings redux set on Eternia.  As the series has progressed though, it has looked at numerous different aspects of the characters and helped to define what exactly made them the way that they are.  This issue takes that to the next level, as it not only examines what exactly She-Ra was doing missing all those years, but also casts a better light on just why it is that Skeletor has always been evil.  As opposed to the stunt-like storytelling elsewhere at DC, this builds the character’s backgrounds in meaningful ways, which while restructuring them, also pays homage to what made the characters so popular to begin with.  The story here is simple enough, as Skeletor and his allies plus She-Ra decide to journey to Despondos in order to find a way to stop Hordak.  Before stepping foot into the dimension, Skeletor reveals what happened to him before he left, and it drastically alters the situation.

This series has thus far had its successes and its relative lows, but this issue contains the best example of story telling thus far.  At a time when it seems to be popular to re-invent superheroes, this series proves that it is the one to do it right.  There are bound to be those who will still think that this is “just a He-Man story” but those that do so are missing one of the best comic series on the market in the past half year.  DC has proved with a few other series that it is not afraid to take chances, and while outside of its main universe, this series belongs with those few others.  After all, He-Man maybe be sci-fi/fantasy, but both genres are defined by their epic stories, and this is shaping up to be one.

Story: Rob David and Dan Abnett Art: Edgar Salazar
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

 

 

Review: He-Man Eternity War #6

He-Man - The Eternity War (2014-) 006 - covFor those that might look at Eternity War as a He-Man related comic event, they would only be partially correct.  The powers that be at Mattel have been working hand in hand with the comic creators to tell a story that is above and beyond what has come before, and in so doing has looked some of the archetypes of hero and villain.  So far it has been examined why exactly Skeletor feels the need to switch sides to being aligned with the heroes, but this issue takes on a different theme, that of the superhero and the secret identity.  The Prince Adam secret identity of He-Man has been one which has been with the hero since the onset, and helped to appeal the story to some from a storytelling standpoint.  The idea of nobility having a double life as a hero is nothing new, it comes from sources such as Zorro and the Scarlet Pimpernel, and even from Batman, but the need for the secret identity has never been examined as it has here.

The majority of this issue acts as a flash forward for the characters.  An older He-Man rules absolutely over Eternia, but as they say absolute power corrupts absolutely, and a short vignette of the actions of this are explained here.  In so doing it looks not only at the character but also at the superhero medium as a whole.  In a world where so many superheroes are super powered operatives whose identities are known, this issue helps to make the case why secret identities are still a valuable part of hero’s lives.

This may not be the most hard hitting of the issues thus far in the series, but there is much to be said for the approach of the creative team.  While earlier issues focused almost wholly on epic battles, the focus has changed drastically to being something much different.  Now the characters are examining not only who they are, but also almost breaking the fourth wall to examine some issues beyond.  Thus while this issue lacks a true hook in terms of plot development it fits neatly in the sequence of this series.

Story: Rob David and Dan Abnett Art: Pop Mhan
Story: 8.8 Art: 8.8 Overall: 8.8 Recommendation: Buy

 

Review: He-Man Eternity War #5

hemaneternitywar005The latest run of He-Man in his own title has perhaps been the best representation of the character thus far in his experience in popular culture.  This run focused a more mature approach to the character which aims to highlight both the strengths of the sci-fi/fantasy mix while also presenting characters that are far more approachable for those who are not fans of the character.  That is to say that He-Man has achieved a degree of quality which does not depend on the character himself for the stories, but rather the characters and his allies and enemies simply populate the stories which would be equally strong in other cases.  This story first approach is one which benefits most series and characters, and it has been especially highlighted with the Eternity War miniseries.

The most recent issue of Eternity War was one of contrasts.  While it was overall pretty well put together, it nonetheless had a few of the common problems often associated with comics as a medium.  In this case it was specifically the near death of She-Ra, a little bit of a reduction of a powerful female character to a damsel-in-distress like sidekick.  Although the series seemed to be veering down a well trodden road, it takes this same development and turns it around in this issue in an unforeseen and entirely inventive turn.  It reintroduces the old DC comics concept known as hypertime (even mentioning it by name) and in the process features what must be the first in continuity appearance of an action figure in the medium.  The rest of the issue pushes the plot forward, as well as given the He-Man fans something to be excited about, in a “will they or won’t they?” context, in the last few pages.

The creative teram continues to reimagine the characters of the Masters of the Universe in this interesting issue.  While the plot itself is maybe a bit more commonplace, the tricks that they pull out of their bag are not, even breaking what fans might consider the regular boundaries of the fourth wall.  The end result is an issue which once again proves that this new take on the character is for real and deserves attention.

Story: Rob David and Dan Abnett Art: Pop Mhan
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: He-Man Eternity War #4

eternityThe exploits of He-Man and his allies have been given somewhat of a Renaissance since the relaunching of the character by DC Comics.  Long considered a character associated with children’s toys, the new series melds the previous stories of the character with a new mix of science fiction and fantasy.  Part of the problem with the previous incarnations of the character is that he was tied to the children’s cartoon from the 1980s, and as such faced a similar problem that the comics of the golden age faced.  Each episode was serialized and thus was self contained and thus it made it more difficult to build back stories for the character that would carry over from one episode to another.

If there was ever an attempt at world building by He-Man then this series is it.  It throws off the remnants of its supposedly childish past and gives the characters new meaning by expanding their back stories.  As was seen in issue #3, She-Ra led an assault against enemy forces only to be confronted by a more powerful Hordak.  The use of Hordak here is well done.  He is already established as an enemy of He-Man, She-Ra and also Skeletor, but the use of different villains here helps to solidify his true evil.  Equally as much of this issue focuses on She-Ra it is an effective way to highlight the character that has for too long been more of a punchline in He-Man as opposed to a serious player.

Eternity War is evidently the story that will unify all disparate parts of the He-Man stories and combine them together into an adult setting.  There will be those that still will be hung up on the association with toys, but as is being proven elsewhere as well, it does not matter really what the inspiration is as long as solid characters drive solid stories, and this series succeeds at both.  The end result of this combination is that this is a standout series, one which is one of the stronger entries in sci-fi fantasy in today’s market, and more would recognize this if they let go of their preconceptions.

Story: Rob David and Dan Abnett Art: Pop Mhan
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

« Older Entries