Tag Archives: namor

Unboxing: August 2018’s Comic of the Month Club

Comic of the Month Club is a monthly comic subscription box for comic book fans everywhere. Subscribers receive 11 personally curated comics every month and fill out a preference form as to what they’re interested in.

You can subscribe now. Please include “Graphic Policy” in the referral space. You as a subscriber receive an extra bonus and we do get something in return.

Find out what’s in this month’s box!

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Unboxing: July 2018’s Comic of the Month Club

Comic of the Month Club is a monthly comic subscription box for comic book fans everywhere. Subscribers receive 11 personally curated comics every month and fill out a preference form as to what they’re interested in.

You can subscribe now! Please include “Graphic Policy” in the referral space. You as a subscriber receive an extra bonus and we do get something in return.

Find out what’s in this month’s box!

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day tomorrow! What’s everyone excited for? What do you plan on getting? Sound off in the comments below!

Kotaku – After Child Pornography Fine, Rurouni Kenshin Will Resume Publication This June – Uh….

CBR – Comic Legends: Was Action Comics #1 Really Released on April 18th? – No, the comic has a a cover release of June which means May.

IGN – Marvel Studios Boss Addresses Namor’s Complicated Rights Status – But my friends’ brother’s school mater said…

Unboxing: February 2018’s Comic of the Month Club

Comic of the Month Club is a monthly comic subscription box for comic book fans everywhere. Subscribers receive 9 personally curated comics every month and fill out a preference form as to what they’re interested in.

You can subscribe now. Please include “Graphic Policy” in the referral space. You as a subscriber receive an extra bonus and we do get something in return.

Find out what’s in this month’s box!

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Game Review: Legendary Secret Wars Vol. 1

secretwarsLegendary Secret Wars Vol. 1 is the fifth expansion of the Marvel Legendary base game, but also only the second big box expansion.  Thus far Marvel Legendary has been extremely streamlined, as every expansion has mostly built on the group of characters in the game while also expanding slowly but strategically on the base rules.  Inevitably though, anything which is Marvel is going to be compared to DC, and so the comparison to the DC Comics Deck Building Game is going to be discussed as well, and for the first time it would seem as though Upper Deck is taking on Cryptozoic with this new release.  What DC Comics Deck Building lacks in a concise gameplay experience, it makes up for in variety.  It already features a head-to-head option, as well as a wider variety of characters to play with, both as the main character and as cards to be acquired.  Due to the framework of the game, Legendary has always been a bit behind in this regard.  Not counting the Villains expansion, this represents the 60th playable character in the series, and even at that, three of those have now been a version of Wolverine.

There are some new rules for this game, some which work and some which don’t.  Potentially the most interesting was the Sidekicks group of cards, which could have been thematically different, just with the specialists in Legendary Encounters: Aliens, but they come off as identical versions of themselves.  More interesting is the ability to “purchase” Ultimate heroes by defeating them in combat.  Among others this includes the first time that Wasp is a playable character in the franchise, though evidently not directly as we might have hoped.  There are a couple of other interesting rules changes, including multiclass cards and the ability to bribe your enemies instead of attacking them directly, but the biggest change overall is that of the head-to-head option.  This is aided in part by the Ambition deck of cards, but evidently this does not work thematically as much as it should.  In this case one player can play as a mastermind and recruit heroes (by corrupting them).  This comes off as a bit disingenuous for the series which has tried at all times to keep the game experience as close as possible to the comics experience (as opposed to DC) and seems to be there only so players can have a true player-vs-player experience.  While this version of the game does come off as a bit weird, it ends up working pretty well when following the suggested rules for integrating both the Heroes and the Villains game.  This is also noteworthy as the cards are not only compatible with both games, but also help to incorporate them together.

The new cards are mostly impressive additions to the mix, though it is evident that Upper Deck is still holding back some of the bigger characters so that there will be interest in future expansions.  The biggest names that fans are going to be interested in are Kitty Pryde, Captain Marvel and Black Panther, although there are probably others happy to see Thanos, Doctor Strange, Black Bolt, Lady Thor and Namor.  The remainder of the playable heroes is a bit of a mixed bag, featuring another Wolverine, another Spider-Man, another Iron Man, and a few others to tie into the Secret Wars story line from Marvel.  Other noteworthy cards are new groups of henchmen, which have been notably absent since the first expansion, and a new bystander card, the banker, with an interesting mechanic.

This expansion also represents a move away from what fans might have though was going to be a closer tie-in to the movies, as last year’s Guardians of the Galaxy coincided closely enough with the movie.  For those that were hoping to see Ant-Man and Wasp show up any time, they will be disappointed.  At the very least though, Upper Deck seems to have a long terms plan for this series, and while there might be a bit of disappointment among fans for the releases here, it would seem likely that they plan something to coincide with next year’s Captain America movie, which could include Ant-Man, Wasp, Scarlet Witch, Vision and Falcon among others.  As well at some point a Secret Wars vol. 2 of the game is presumably coming, which could also help to fill in some gaps.  In the meantime, fans will have to be happy with this expansion, which contains a bit of what they wanted, but also a bit more which they did not.  It is not a disappointment, as the cards themselves are well conceived for the game experience, but they appeal more to the true gamers, not those who are are also comic fans.  It thus ends up being a solid expansion gamewise, but leaving a bit more to be desired thematically.

Score: 8.0  

SDCC 2015: Hasbro’s Marvel Figure Reveals

At San Diego Comic-Con, Hasbro revealed future releases for their Marvel action figure line.

Captain America Marvel Legends

Figures include Axis Red Skull, Classic Captain America, Mockingbird, Nuke, and Taskmaster.

Spider-Man Marvel Legends

Figures include Absorbing Man, Ben Reilly, Beetle, Jack O’Lantern, Morbius, Speed Demon, Spider-Gwen, and Venom! Sign me up for a Spider-Gwen please!

And don’t forget Namor!

Namor Sneak Peek

Is Aquaman a Victim of Power Creep?

aquamanPower creep is a loosely defined term mostly because it is subjective in its application. Generally speaking though, power creep can be roughly described as the general evolution of character’s powers over time. For the fickle readers and writers of comics, these powers becomes part of the character’s canon, and represent abilities and powers which should be perpetuated. In the golden age of comics, Wonder Woman once found herself trapped in outer space, and needing a source of oxygen, she ground her earrings to dust, somehow releasing enough oxygen that she could safely breathe. It did not matter that this was a throwaway occurrence or that it made very little sense, but all of a sudden Wonder Woman’s earrings had the ability to allow her to breathe in outer space. The same kind of runaway powers are prevalent in almost every hero, with debates over who can smash a planet, or a sun or a galaxy.

The advent of power creep is not always to an infinite degree. Sometimes the creep comes and then goes. Many fans either applauded or decried the post-Crisis Superman as written by John Byrne. Gone was the outlandishly powerful character who could scarcely be stopped by any theoretical angle. It seemed as though that anytime that he faced a threat that he developed a hitherto unseen power and that this power became another part of his canon. Fans might even look to the extreme such as in the movie Superman II when he throws his S-symbol from his chest and it becomes a giant cellophane trap for his enemies. In contrast Byrne created a character, that while still strong far beyond human capabilities, still had some limitations. The new more approachable and realistic character was what some wanted to see and what others did not. Regardless, this character did not last long either before returning to near omnipotent powers.

Among the core members of the Justice League and of the A-list of DC Comics characters, Aquaman is the one that has received the most negative attention in the years since his introduction. He was long thought of a running joke among those that looked at the medium from afar, with numerous comedic jabs at his unimpressive powers being a staple of social media and some paid professional comedians. The question is though, how did the character end up as a running gag for so long.The main problem it would seem is in the setting of the character. The undersea world is a great one for exploration, with the likes of Jacques Cousteau having made a career just out of underwater exploration. The appeal of the underwater world is there, but equally in terms of how comics tend to allow power creep onto characters, it also became one of a limitation. For DC characters with such ill-defined power or ability inspiration as “Super”, “Wonder” or “Bat” it is easy to expand their abilities beyond those of those words, as the words can be taken to mean different things, even in the case of “Bat” which might only be a creature to some, but to others represents the night or sneakiness or resourcefulness. “Aqua” it would seem is a limitation in terms of how comic writers thought of powers to develop for the character.

Some writers rightfully pointed to the fact that a character that can swim underwater and withstand the great depths and pressures of the oceans would be equally be superhumanly strong, maybe not the levels of Superman and Wonder Woman, but well beyond that of a normal human. While there were some sensical derivations of his powers, others were goofy. The ability to speak to or command marine life might have been a logical power to attach to the character, but equally this power was ill-defined and also generally useless, at least when it compared to the ability to move mountains or walk through walls. Equally so, when the character lost his hand in the 1990s during a reboot/darkening of the character, it was replaced by nothing other than a small harpoon, the writers once again unable to think of anything for the character beyond the aspect of the sea. His power creep did not occur to a great degree, but it seemed that when it did, that the character just became a bit more aquatic than he had before. Even compared to a pretty aquatic character in Namor, the Sub-Mariner, Aquaman’s powers were very sea based as Namor showed the ability to fly.

aqotherTo be fair since the relaunch of the new 52, the character is one of the DC properties that has really taken off, now ostensibly holding down two separate series at DC, a capability that previously had only been able to be accomplished by Superman, Batman, sometimes Green Lantern and rarely Wonder Woman. It would seem that the serious tone for the character now is one which has aided him, at least in the public perception. As his own entourage of the Others provides his own superhero team, they fill out the slow creep into more powers that another character might have experienced since long ago. As to whether power creep is actually a good thing or not is up to the fans to decide, but for so long it seemed, at least until recent years that Aquaman was left behind in the balance of powers.

Catching Up on Reviews, Part 8 — Fear Itself

Fear Itself #1 (Marvel) – For the record, I am a big fan of the thematic art that ties Fear Itself together. I think I like just about every single cover of the series and tie-ins. I also like the story better than any of the recent Marvel events, maybe going back to Secret Invasion. Issue one is exactly what the launch of a big event should be like. Matt Fraction’s writing really pulls us right into the story and sets up the importance of the conflict. Suart Immonen’s art is near-flawless, it takes chances and it captures the grandness of the epic. Some of the keys here are the supposed helplessness of Steve Rogers, the fall of Thor and the cryptic rise of the Serpent.

Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10

Fear Itself #2 (Marvel) – I’ll say that the hammer concept used here is just great and the idea that the Worthy are drawn from across the spectrum of good and evil is great as well. The level of the threat established here from the very beginning is awe-inspiring. How can anyone stand up to eight of the most powerful characters in the Marvel universe who have all been given significant power boosts. Plus the Serpent, the one who gave them all the power boosts. Plus Odin and all of Asgard. Fraction continues to tell a great story and Immonen’s art impresses as well, particularly the new appearance of Juggernaut, which I think is one of the coolest-looking characters I’ve ever seen, and the opening shot of Blitzkreig U.S.A., which is breathtaking.

Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10

Fear Itself #3 (Marvel) – It would seem difficult for Immonen to improve his art, but in this issue, he does it. Some of the most epic battle and apocalyptic artwork to ever appear in Marvel is in this issue. Fraction also ups the ante on the story with a shocking death that you wouldn’t have expected.

Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10

Fear Itself #4 (Marvel) – While it would seem likely that four issues into a series like this, it would be prime time for a letdown and, to be fair, this issue is the weakest so far, but that’s not a knock on this issue, which is better than most things on the market, it’s just not quite as good as the previous issues, which were all superb. There is still some amazing art — Immonen’s Thor looks amazing — and a couple of great plot points towards the end, involving Tony Stark-Odin and Thor-Hulk-Thing. Issue #5 will have to be a barn-burner with a set-up like this.

Story: 9.75 Art: 9.75 Overall: 9.75

Fear Itself – Book of the Skull (Marvel) – Another example of the over-used Marvel device of extensive retcons that add backstory to current events. This one isn’t a bad one, and it helps set up Fear Itself, but I think I’ve already forgotten the point of the story, and I just put it down.

Story: 6 Art: 7 Overall: 6.5

Fear Itself – Deadpool #1 (Marvel) – Cartoonish art and a cartoonish story — and I don’t mean that in a good way — make for another bad comic in the extensive overuse and killing off of the quality of the Deadpool character.

Story: 5 Art: 5 Overall: 5

Fear Itself – Deadpool #2 (Marvel) – When the best thing about an issue is the picture on the cover of Deadpool in MC Hammer pants, you know that reading a comic would be a waste of your time.

Story: 4 Art: 5 Overall: 4.5

Fear Itself – Fearsome Four #1 (Marvel) – The art in this series is my least favorite in the past few months, but even the art is better than the story, which inexplicably teams up Howard the Duck, Frankenstein’s Monster, She-Hulk and Nighthawk and calls them “Fearsome” because they are interacting with the Man-Thing. It isn’t as coherent as it sounds.

Story: 3 Art: 4 Overall: 3.5

Fear Itself – Fearsome Four #2 (Marvel) – The art here is a little worse, almost unprofessional, but the story is a little more coherent. It’s still a bad comic and a terrible series. Has to be a very strong contender for Worst Limited Series of 2011.

Story: 4 Art: 3 Overall: 3.5

Fear Itself – FF #1 (Marvel) – Much better premise for a Fear Itself spin-off, how do the Thing’s friends deal with his conversion to a monster? The issue has great tension and a compelling story, something missing from most of the Fear Itself tie-ins. Kudos to writer Cullen Bunn.

Story: 9 Art: 7 Overall: 8

Fear Itself – Sins Past (Marvel) – I’m not a fan of these reprint issues from Marvel. While it does have a little bit of new material, it doesn’t reprint stories that are important enough or compelling enough that they should’ve wasted an issue on it.

Story: 7 Art: 7 Overall: 7

Fear Itself – Spider-Man #1 (Marvel) – It’s pretty clear that, to date, The Spider-Man Fear Itself spin-off is the best of the mini-series. Chris Yost does an amazing job here of framing the Fear Itself story in terms of the regular people who face it and not just the super-heroes. Sure, Spidey is the lead here, but he’s really just another small figure going through this big event and not sure he’s going to be able to cope with it. Mike McKone’s art is stylish and unique and adds to the story.

Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.75

Fear Itself – Spider-Man #2 (Marvel) – Yost’s story continues to impress, but the key in this issue is McKone’s art, which takes chances and more often than not succeeds. This issue has a lot of stunning art and a strong story to go with it.

Story: 9.25 Art: 9.75 Overall: 9.5

Fear Itself – Spider-Man #3 (Marvel) – The art isn’t quite as good in this issue, although it has its moments. The story is an interesting twist on past Spidey-FF crossovers, this time with Spidey clashing with the Thing instead of the Human Torch, who isn’t around anymore.

Story: 9.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 9

Fear Itself – The Deep #1 (Marvel) – I’m not really that big a fan of Namor and stories that focus on him frequently leave me bored, but this one has enough guest stars (Including Dr. Strange, who I like a lot) and good enough art to make it worth a read.

Story: 7 Art: 8 Overall: 7.5

Fear Itself – The Homefront #1 (Marvel) – I’m not a big fan of the Marvel anthology mini-series, either, as most of the time, the individual stories aren’t that good. That is only partially true here. The first story, starring Speedball is awfully compelling and has amazing, almost photo-realistic art. The team of Christos Gage, Mike Mayhew and Rain Beredo does a great job. The Agents of Atlas story, though, is much like the rest of the Atlas stories, in that it doesn’t really grab my attention and I forget about it right after reading it since the characters and the story don’t do much to excite me. It isn’t poorly executed, just nothing special. The final story, about the residents of Broxton, Oklahoma, after the departure of the Asgardians, is interesting if not essential.

Story: 7.5 Art: 8 Overall: 7.75

Fear Itself – The Homefront #2 (Marvel) – The first two stories in this issue are amazingly consistent with the first issue. The Speedball story is just as good and the Atlas story is just as mediocre. The third story, which is about Liz Allan and Tigershark, I think, aims high, but doesn’t quite deliver.

Story: 7 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.25

Fear Itself – The Homefront #3 (Marvel) – The Speedball story, if anything, gets better in this issue. The story in the Atlas tale is growing on me a little bit, but the art is losing me. A third tale, starring Cardiac, has a compelling tale to tell about revenge and redemption, but the art is too cartoonish for the weight of the story.

Story: 7.75 Art: 7 Overall: 7.5

Fear Itself – The Homefront #4 (Marvel) – My thought is that the Speedball story here should’ve been expanded and given its own series or one-shot and that the Atlas story, which ends here, should’ve been eliminated altogether. Some of the art in the Speedball story is amongst the best in the entire Fear Itself storyline. The third tale here, starring someone apparently known as the Blue Marvel, is puzzling. If I’m supposed to know who he is, I don’t. If I’m supposed to get something big from the story, I don’t. I’m left with nothing but question marks, mostly the one after the question “Who is Blue Marvel and why am I reading about him”?

Story: 7 Art: 8 Overall: 7.5

Fear Itself – Uncanny X-Force #1 (Marvel) – While Simone Bianchi’s art takes a lot of chances, and some of them succeed, I don’t like a lot of the detail of the characters’ faces. The story itself is only vaguely related to Fear Itself, but it is a pretty good and interesting.

Story: 9 Art: 7 Overall: 8

Fear Itself – Wolverine #1 (Marvel) – I don’t really find much about this comic compelling, not the premise, not the story and not the art. I think that Marvel (and probably DC, too), should cut back on the number of extra series that are related to their events and make sure that every series really has a good premise and a point to its creation. This one doesn’t seem to meet that.

Story: 6 Art: 6 Overall: 6

Fear Itself – Youth In Revolt #1 (Marvel) – I like the idea of bringing back the Initiative, it wasn’t a bad idea when it was done before and done right now, it could be a good thing. I’m not sure the characters they chose to focus on in this series are the best ones, though.

Story: 7 Art: 7 Overall: 7

Fear Itself – Youth In Revolt #2 (Marvel) – So after the first issue, which doesn’t really have great, compelling characters, the way to expand that is to bring in Frog Man? Really?

Story: 6 Art: 7 Overall: 6.5

Fear Itself – Youth In Revolt #3 (Marvel) – Much better, bring in Juggernaut, improve the art and end it with a shocking finale that makes you actually care what happens in the series.

Story: 8 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.75

Fear Itself – The Worthy #1 (Marvel) – Okay, so we know a little bit more about Sin’s background and it’s obvious why she is Worthy, but this isn’t something that is particularly memorable.

Story: 6 Art: 7 Overall: 6.5

Fear Itself – The Worthy #2 (Marvel) – To date, I think that Juggernaut is the coolest of the Worthy, but this issue doesn’t do anything to explain why and is a bit of a weak link in the Juggernaut portion of Fear Itself.

Story: 5 Art: 5 Overall: 5

Fear Itself – The Worthy #3 (Marvel) – This issue seems to give a little bit of insight as to why Titania is Worthy, but I can’t escape the feeling that she gets in because she’s dating the Absorbing Man and he’s Worthy.

Story: 6 Art: 6 Overall: 6

Fear Itself – The Worthy #4 (Marvel) – If anything, this story makes it seem like the Grey Gargoyle is unworthy. He’s a bit of a whiny loser, how does that make him a prime candidate for serving the serpent?

Story: 5 Art: 5 Overall: 5

Fear Itself – The Worthy #5 (Marvel) – Solid, if not spectacular, tale of why the Hulk is Worthy. Doesn’t tell us anything we don’t know, but could be valuable to newer readers.

Story: 7 Art: 8 Overall: 7.5

Fear Itself – The Worthy #6 (Marvel) – I’m not sure I get the point of this backstory of why Attuma is Worthy. It tells a little bit more about his background than we previously knew, but we already knew he was an evil bastard, what does this add to that?

Story: 7 Art: 6 Overall: 6.5

Fear Itself – The Worthy #7 (Marvel) – A brief bio of Absorbing Man that doesn’t tell us anything we don’t know, doesn’t explain why he’s worthy and doesn’t help the story.

Story: 6 Art: 4 Overall: 5

Fear Itself – The Worthy #8 (Marvel) – This one focuses on the last of the Worthy, the Thing, and moreso than any of the other issues, it makes it clear why the Thing becomes one of the Serpent’s servants. The only issue of this series that really adds something to the story. Too bad the art is so weak.

Story: 9 Art: 5 Overall: 7

Your First Look at Steve Rogers: Super-Soldier Annual #1

Official Press Release

Your First Look at STEVE ROGERS: SUPER-SOLDIER ANNUAL #1

Marvel is pleased to present your first look at the second cataclysmic chapter of “Escape From The Negative Zone,” from writer James Asmus and artist Ibraim Roberson in Steve Rogers: Super-Soldier Annual #1! The X-Men have been marked for execution by King Blastaar but luckily, Steve Rogers is on his way into enemy territory to save them! Can the original Sentinel of Liberty take on the entire Negative Zone alone?

Spinning directly into next month’s Namor: The First Mutant Annual #1, the senses-shattering crossover event of the spring continues in Steve Rogers: Super-Soldier Annual #1! With their biggest threat still a mystery, can Steve and the X-Men make it out of the King Blastaar’s realm alive?

Plus don’t forget to see how this epic story begins in Uncanny X-Men Annual #3 on sale next week!

Escape From The Negative Zone: Part One

UNCANNY X-MEN ANNUAL #3 (JAN110796)

Written by JAMES ASMUS

Penciled by NICK BRADSHAW

Cover by BLACK FROG

Rated T+ …$3.99

On Sale – 3/16/11

STEVE ROGERS: SUPER-SOLDIER ANNUAL #1 (FEB110542)
Written by JAMES ASMUS
Penciled by IBRAIM ROBERSON
Cover by BLACK FROG
Rated T+ …$3.99
FOC – 3/21/11, On Sale – 4/13/11

NAMOR: THE FIRST MUTANT ANNUAL #1 (MAR110712)
Written by JAMES ASMUS
Penciled by MAX FIUMARA
Cover by BLACK FROG
Rated T+ …$3.99
FOC – 4/25/11, On Sale – 5/18/11

Steve Rogers: Super-Soldier Annual #1 Cover Read more

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