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The 2020 Harvey Award Winners Have Been Announced

The Harvey Awards

Ahead of the official ceremony later this week, the winners for the 2020 Harvey Awards have been announced. The award ceremony has gone virtual this year with the initial group of nominees announced in August and then the winners chosen by vote.

The 2020 winners are:

Book of the Year: Dragon Hoops by Gene Luen Yang (First Second)
Digital Book of the Year: The Nib edited by Matt Bors (thenib.com)
Best Children or Young Adult Book: Superman Smashes the Klan by Gene Luen Yang and Gurihiru (DC Comics)
Best Manga: Witch Hat Atelier by Kamome Shirahama (Kodansha Comics)
Best International Book: Grass by Keum Suk Gendry-Kim, translated by Janet Hong (Drawn and Quarterly)
Best Adaptation from a Comic Book/Graphic Novel: Watchmen by HBO, based on Watchmen (DC Comics)

The Harveys will also be inducting Osamu Tezuka (Astro Boy), Jill Thompson (Scary Godmother), and the founding members of Milestone Media which includes Denys Cowan, Derek T. Dingle, Michael Davis, and the late Dwayne McDuffie into this year’s Harvey Awards Hall of Fame.

The virtual ceremony will be broadcast on October 9 at 4:50 pm as part of New York Comic Con’s Metaverse. The ceremony will be hosted by Vivek Tiwary and will feature Gene Luen Yang, Neil Gaiman, Jill Thompson, and Damon Lindelof.

(via The Hollywood Reporter)

Around the Tubes

New York Comic Con is over, and we’re dealing with the aftermath. We’ll have lots of interviews and con coverage over the next few weeks, but until then, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

The ComiChron – Shattered Empire #1, Saga Vol. 5 lead sluggish September comics orders – We’ve got word from stores it’s much worse than reported.

The Outhousers – Enjoy: The Strange Saga of Cartoonist Matt Bors, Pharmaceutical Troll Martin Shkreli, and a 10,000 Dollar Debate – That escalated quickly.

ICv2 – Greg Capullo to take hiatus from Batman – Well that sucks.

University of Toronto – Child Soldier: graphic novel tells real-life story of U of T student  – This sounds amazing.

Kotaku – The KFC Superhero Comic Is One of the Weirdest Things You’ll Read All Week – Yeah…

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

CBR – The Prospector Vol. 1

 

Listen to Graphic Policy Radio with Guest Matt Bors on Demand

This Monday saw a brand new episode of Graphic Policy Radio with brand new guest, Matt Bors!

Bors is an editorial cartoonist and editor of The Nib and was working at Medium running it since 2013. In 2012 he was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and became the first alt-weekly cartoonist to win the Herblock Prize for Excellence in Cartooning. Currently he’s running a Kickstarter to collecting some of the best political cartoons, comics journalism, non-fiction and humor.

Eat More Comics packs more than 300 pages featuring dozens of the best cartoonists to ever toon a toon. I mean, it’s going to be a large book.

We talked to him about the Kickstarter, The Nib, and more!

You have until 4pm on August 12 to contribute to the Kickstarter and get your copy.

 

Graphic Policy Radio with Guest Matt Bors LIVE this Monday

GP Radio pic MondayThis Monday is a brand new episode of Graphic Policy Radio with a brand new guest, Matt Bors! The show airs LIVE this Monday at 10pm ET.

Bors is an editorial cartoonist and editor of The Nib and was working at Medium running it since 2013. In 2012 he was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and became the first alt-weekly cartoonist to win the Herblock Prize for Excellence in Cartooning. Currently he’s running a Kickstarter to collecting some of the best political cartoons, comics journalism, non-fiction and humor.

Eat More Comics packs more than 300 pages featuring dozens of the best cartoonists to ever toon a toon. I mean, it’s going to be a large book.

We’re going to talk to him about the Kickstarter, The Nib, and more!

We also want to hear from you. Tweet us your questions @graphicpolicy.

The show airs live this Monday, August 3, at 10pm ET.

SPX 2015 Announces Special Guests Matt Bors, Lilli Carré and Theo Ellsworth

spx-logo-240SPX has announced 21st Century creators Matt Bors, Lilli Carré and Theo Ellsworth as guests at SPX 2016. This is in addition to the previously announced creators of the current century Kate Beaton, Luke Pearson, Noelle Stevenson, Michael DeForge, Gemma Correll and Noah Van Sciver.

SPX 2016 takes place on Saturday and Sunday, September 19-20, and will have over 650 creators, 280 exhibitor tables and 22 programming slots to entertain, enlighten and introduce attendees to the amazing world of independent and small press comics.

Matt Bors irreverent take on politics and society garnished him the prestigious Herblock Award in 2012, as well as being a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Editorial Cartooning. His cartoons appear in such alt-weekly newspapers as the Sacramento Bee and the Pittsburgh City Paper as well as online. He is the editor of the widely read and critically acclaimed web site The Nib, which since its inception in 2013, has published over 2000 social and politically oriented cartoons and comics. For SPX 2015, there is a Kickstarter campaign underway to publish the first print collection of works from The Nib’s wealth of graphic social commentary, with cartoons and comics by Matt Bors, Gemma Correll, Erica Moen, Emily Flake, Matt Lubchansky, Ted Rall, Keith Knight, Liza Donnelly and Ann telnaes, amongst other contributors.

Illustrator, animator and cartoonist Lilli Carré is the co-founder of the Eyeworks Festival of Experimental Animation in Chicago, which will occur November 5-7, 2015. Her animated cartoons have been shown across the world at the Edinburgh International Film Festival, Sundance Film Festival and the International Festival Rotterdam, amongst other venues. Her artwork has been displayed at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and her illustration work has appeared in the New York Times, and The New Yorker. Her most recent compilation of comics, Heads or Tails published by Fantagraphics, went into its second printing this year.

SPX 2015 will see the debut of Theo Ellsworth’s final installment of his dense, surreal, exquisitely drawn comics series trilogy, Understanding Monsters –  Book Three, from Secret Acres. Understanding Monsters –  Book One was selected for The Best American Comics 2014 and was named an Lynd Ward Prize Honor Book. Understanding Monsters –  Book Two was recently selected to be represented in the Society of Illustrators Cartoon Annual in New York. Ellsworth was a contributed to the Eisner Award winning book, Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream, as well as to the political anthology Occupy Comics. He also displays his two and three dimensional works in art galleries around the United States.

Small Press Expo (SPX) is the preeminent showcase for the exhibition of independent comics, graphic novels, and alternative political cartoons. SPX is a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit that brings together more than 650 artists and publishers to meet their readers, booksellers, and distributors each year. Graphic novels, mini comics, and alternative comics will all be on display and for sale by their authors and illustrators. The expo includes a series of panel discussions and interviews with this year’s guests.

The Ignatz Award is a festival prize held every year at SPX recognizing outstanding achievement in comics and cartooning, with the winners chosen by attendees at the show.

As in previous years, profits from the SPX will go to support the SPX Graphic Novel Gift Program, which funds graphic novel purchases for public and academic libraries, as well as the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF), which protects the First Amendment rights of comic book readers and professionals.

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day tomorrow! DC is kicking off their post Convergence plans! What are you looking forward to?

Around the Tubes

Comics Alliance – ‘Agents of SHIELD’ Season 3 Promotes Luke Mitchell to Inhuman Series Regular – But will he learn to act?

ICv2 – Is All Fair in Art and Commerce? Copyrights, Cons, and the Law – Good things to think about.

The Beat – Matt Bors on changes at the Nib – Hopefully the changes go positive.

CBR – “Ultimate Spider-Man” and “Avengers” Renewed on Disney XD with New Titles – Cool.

MassLive – Nerd Nite to feature comics and stress relief – Awesome to see.

Hindu Times – Graphic novel as an antidote to extremism – We’re seeing this more and more!

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Nothing But Comics – Age of Reptiles: Ancient Egyptians #1

CBR – Fresh Romance #1

CBR – Ragnarok #5

CBR – Sandman Overture #5

CBR – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #46

Review: Occupy Comics #3

OccupyComics 3 CoverThis week sees the final issue of the Kickstarter funded, Black Mask Studios published Occupy Comics. With the third issue, we get a solid final entry full of though provoking cartoons, editorials and a great history lesson from Alan Moore. The Occupy Comics trilogy is a once-in-a-lifetime collaboration of more than 50 comics pros is a celebration of Occupy and a time-capsule of the movement’s themes. The organizers and creators are donating all their revenue after costs to Occupy-related efforts and initiatives as well.

This issue features the talents of the before mentioned Moore, Molly Crabapple, Joshua Dysart, Caleb Monroe, Kevin Colden, Swifty Lang, Salgood Sam, Brea and Zane Grant, Shannon Wheeler and Charlie Adlard. If you’re a fan of any of these creators, this is a must get as far as comics.

The stories vary in quality and length with every one at least good and a few in the great category. Overall, there’s an air over the issue, since is the last one. A few entries reflect on the fleetingness of the Occupy movement, but also could be used as commentary on a series that I wish would go on for longer.

Occupy Comics is a perfect combination of comics and politics with a great balance of education, fairness and not being too preachy. Even though it’s labelled as Occupy, it never really takes on side or the other about the movement as each creator ads their own voice and thoughts about it. To have an anthology that allows this political thought and expression go is a loss for the comics community and I wish we could see more of it.

No matter your take on the Occupy movement as a whole, this issue, and the two that proceeded it, is a nice look at a political movement that fizzled quickly and whose long lasting contributions will be debated for some time to come. To get first hand accounts, and opinions, about what it all meant and why it happened is important in in the historical sense but also the educational. This series acted as a voice for creators to reflect and be free with what they say without corporate interference, much like the movement itself. It’s voice is one we need and one I hope we see more of down the road.

Story: Caleb Monroe, Mark L. Miller, Zane Grant, Bea Grant, Patrick Meaney, Joshua Dysart, Kelly Bruce, Alan Moore, Kevin Colden, Swifty Lang, Shannon Wheeler Art: Molly Crabapple, Theo Ellsworth, Mark L. Miller, Jonathan Spies, Jenny Gonzalez-Blitz, Eric Zawadzki, Allen Gladfelter, Salgood Sam, Matt Bors, Jerem Morrow, Frank Renoso, Eric Drooker, Charlie Adlard
Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Black Mask Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Occupy Comics #2, 12 Reasons to Die #2 and Ballistic #1

Occupy Comics #2

occThe Kickstarter phenomenon is in it’s second issue and it shows no sign of diminishing in quality. Occupy Comics #2 continues the thought provoking anthology with more strips, prose and in general contributions that actually makes you think. The second issue continues to show that comics and politics do mix. The comics boast an impressive line-up of creators like Alan Moore, David Lloyd, Charlie Adlard, Art Spiegelman, Molly Crabapple, Matt Bors, Mike Allred, Ben Templesmith, J.M. DeMatteis, Tyler Crook, Joshua Hale Fialkov, Joe Infurnari, Ales Kot, Dean Haspiel, Joshua Dysart and Matt Pizzolo.

This issue continues to impress with thought-provoking contributions. Again, it’s pretty non-partisan and numerous entries border on graphic journalism, and might be creating a whole new genre of graphic social commentary. This is a perfect marriage of comics and politics, of course I dug it. Continue to ignore that word “occupy” and don’t let it taint your willingness to give this series a chance. You’ll be surprised, though shouldn’t be considering the talent behind it.

But on top of the political message and commentary, the series continues to be entertaining. The stories contained within are smartly written and beautifully illustrated, making this a package that has depth in message as well as presentation, an awesome combination. It’s a perfect connection between emotion, facts and art. The stories have depth and are well thought out, their intelligence shows.

Despite some pretty heavy hitter names, Matt Miner’s contribution about his experience with Occupy Sandy during Hurricane Sandy is especially emotional. It really opens up your eyes as to what occurred during that storm and clean up after and the travesty that was relief efforts by the government.

I’m a political nerd. I’m a comic geek. Lets occupy some comics!

Story and art: Alan Moore, David Lloyd, Charlie Adlard, Art Spiegelman, Molly Crabapple, Matt Bors, Mike Allred, Ben Templesmith, J.M. DeMatteis, Tyler Crook, Joshua Hale Fialkov, Joe Infurnari, Ales Kot, Dean Haspiel, Joshua Dysart and Matt Pizzolo
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

12 Reasons to Die #2

APR130921_mThis horror-crime hybrid is the latest comic book from the legendary Wu-Tang Clan’s RZA and Ghostface Killah. A brutal tale of gangsters, betrayal, and one vengeful soul hunting the 12 most powerful crimelords in the world.

Two issues in and I’m still pretty entertained by the series which mixes horror and crime. Overall though, this second issue isn’t quite as polished as the first and I wonder if the limited series might be better read in one sitting or as a trade paperback.

Again the comic comes off as disjointed stories, with an attempt to weave them together. That weaving isn’t quite as tight as the first one, and that might be where my issue comes into this. The stories don’t fit as quite nicely together as that first issue, jumping around in the subjects and characters and the art at times differing either too much or not much causing delineation between the chapters to be more difficult.

And that’s where I struggle with the comic. Take each of the stories by themselves and they’d be great. But, together there’s an issue for me and the flow between them is part of it. Breaking each section up, even with a page that just says “chapter 1,” etc. might have helped. It could also be the fact I’m reading it digitally, which makes that more difficult.

I’m also at the point I’d like more information about these records and the bigger picture around them. If they’re just a story device, that’s fine, but I’d like that a bit more clearer.

The series is an example of a multi-platform, transmedia concept project with a storyline that spans from the comic book to the new Ghostface Killah album released simultaneously by RZA’s Soul Temple Records. So, you have a soundtrack to check out while reading the comic.

Overall, this is an entertaining example of cross-media entertainment, but the series needs to pick up a bit for me.

Story: Adrian Younge, Ce Garcia, Matthew Rosenberg, Patrick Kindlon Art: Breno Tamura, Gus Storms, Tim Seeley, Nate Powell, Brian Level, Dave Murdoch
Story: 7 Art: 7 Overall: 7 Recommendation: Read

Ballistic #1

Ballistic-001_600pxWelcome to Repo City State, where everyone’s an asshole… even the air conditioners.

Darick Robertson and Adam Egypt Mortimer’s madcap, psychedelic, transreal, utterly-wacko buddy adventure about Butch and his best friend Gun, a drug-addicted, genetically-modified, foul-mouthed firearm, as they attempt to elevate Butch from air conditioner repairman to master criminal in the twisted, post-eco-apocalyptic Repo City State, a reclaimed trash island built entirely from DNA-based, living technology with bad attitudes.

Ballistic marks Darick Robertson’s return to the hard sci-fi worldbuilding of his classic Transmetropolitan but mixed with The Boys’ ultra-violence and the lunacy of Happy. Mortimer’s mix of speculative science, pulpy noire, and drug-addled adventure cooks up a strange brew of Lethal Weapon by way of Cronenberg meets Dr. Who if written by Odd Future.

If you’re a fan of 80s British comics, then you need to do yourself a favor and pick up this debut issue of a series that I’m sure will be making “best of” lists at the end of the year. The story is a mad rush full of adrenaline in a world so far out there and crazy, it’s hard not to be entertained.

Though it might have that “80s British” vibe, the story also feels fresh and innovative. That package also has a main character that has the snappy banter of coolness of Ash from Army of Darkness. You can take your pick as to which character I’m referring to with that one.

On top of the fun story, there’s visuals that’ll blow you away. The world can’t be described, it can only be seen and you’ll find yourself lingering on pages to catch everything and coming back to do that some more once you’re done reading.

The comic lives up to it’s name and blew me away. This one might be a sleeper, but do yourself a favor and go grab a copy!

Story: Adam Egypt Mortimer Art: Darick Robertson
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Black Mask Studios provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review

Review: Occupy Comics #1 and 12 Reasons to Die #1

Occupy Comics #1

OccupyComics-coverA_600pxStarted off in what seems forever ago, Occupy Comics initially started off as a Kickstarter project, it is now seeing print thanks to Black Mask Studios. An anthology, the comic was as political as they come and channeled the dissatisfaction with the status-quo represented by the Occupy Movement. The comics boast an impressive line-up of creators like Alan Moore, David Lloyd, Charlie Adlard, Art Spiegelman, Molly Crabapple, Matt Bors, Mike Allred, Ben Templesmith, J.M. DeMatteis, Tyler Crook, Joshua Hale Fialkov, Joe Infurnari, Ales Kot, Dean Haspiel, Joshua Dysart and Matt Pizzolo.

Each contribution is thought-provoking and entertaining and shockingly non-partisan. This is a perfect marriage of comics and politics. While many will see that word “occupy” how the stories presented are pretty non-partisan, reflecting the realistic economic times and the political world in which we live.

But on top of that political message, the comic is also entertaining. The stories contained within are smartly written and beautifully illustrated, making this a package that has depth in message as well as presentation, an awesome combination. It’s a perfect connection between emotion, facts and art.

The stories within vary too. They’re not all straight comics, and some mix it up with different forms of storytelling. This is an anthology with a theme first and foremost, not necessarily a “comic.” But it’s all golden. Everything I read had depth and was intelligent. It just grabbed me and I wanted to read more. It made we want more of this type of voice in the more mainstream comics many of these folks write.

On top of the solid stories and art, all revenue received by organizers/creators (past hard costs) will be donated to various Occupy-related initiatives.

This is a perfect example of the marriage of comics and politics. An awesome comic that I can’t wait to see more of.

Story and art: Alan Moore, David Lloyd, Charlie Adlard, Art Spiegelman, Molly Crabapple, Matt Bors, Mike Allred, Ben Templesmith, J.M. DeMatteis, Tyler Crook, Joshua Hale Fialkov, Joe Infurnari, Ales Kot, Dean Haspiel, Joshua Dysart and Matt Pizzolo
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

12 Reasons to Die #1

12ReasonsToDie_issue1coverB_ChristopherMittenThis horror-crime hybrid is the latest comic book from the legendary Wu-Tang Clan’s RZA and Ghostface Killah.

A brutal tale of gangsters, betrayal, and one vengeful soul hunting the 12 most powerful crimelords in the world.

I’m a fan of crime comics. The idea of gangsters and crimelords is just entertaining to me. I tend to gravitate to those stories so this comic was right up my way. But what makes this comic and this “gangster” tale stand out is the horror part of it all. It’s a nice change to the straight up gangster story I was expecting and the type of story I was expecting when I saw that RZA and Ghostface Killah were involved.

There’s a lot going on in the comic, making it not the straightforward crime comic you’d expect. There’s different perspectives and intertwining storylines that’ll be interesting to see how they come together. This is a mystery/horror story with a gangster veneer and the first issue teases that mystery just enough to get me to want to come back and check out more.

You can tell this is a story being told the way they want to be told. It’s a high concept blending story, art and music together. Each section of the first issues is paired with the talents of an artist who does it justice and enhances the story.

What’s even cooler is this is an example of a multi-platform, transmedia concept project with a storyline that spans from the comic book to the new Ghostface Killah album released simultaneously by RZA’s Soul Temple Records. So, you have a soundtrack to check out while reading the comic.

Overall, this is an entertaining example of

Story: Adrian Younge, Ce Garcia, Matthew Rosenberg, Patrick Kindlon Art: Breno Tamura, Gus Storms, Kyle Strahm, Joe Infurnari
Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Black Mask Studios provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review

“Life Begins At Incorporation: Cartoons and Essays” by Matt Bors

Contributor Nicole regularly writes at her own blog Ad Astra Per Aspera. The below is reposted from that site with permission.

mattbors_lifebeginsatincorporationMatt Bors prides himself (perhaps reluctantly) on being “The Last” nationally-syndicated editorial cartoonist in the United States of America. While the rest of the “sequential arts” are in the midst of their own Comic Renaissance, political and editorial cartoons are withering away with printed newspapers—now used with more satisfaction for fireplace starter and nesting material for gerbils than reading.

Despite this, Matt has built a decent following through cartoons and commentary that are consistently present and politically poignant. What do I mean by “present”? Outside of his regular publishing in regional newspapers near his home in the Pacific Northwest, his website archives all of his comics—which, from the perspective of social media (which have been steadily replacing print as our chief news sources for the past decade) are all very “share-friendly”. The first piece I ever saw of Matt’s got passed along in my Facebook feed, I believe, by the The Occupy Wall Street Page:

steve jobs

Web comic celebrity Matt Inman once put it a few years back, “With The Oatmeal, I wanted to create something where the viral marketing itself was the product, rather than trying to put it on something else.” I would argue that, er, Matt B. essentially does the same thing except with politicians instead of cats wearing ties (which does hurt his stats a little bit). In the realm of politics, though, Bors’ drawn conclusions are successfully competing with mainstream news media, (and they downright Haretsukan others in the domain of editorial cartooning). While the medium of the comic panels is almost defined by its accessibility, as Matt Inman hints at, the content of said panels remains a refreshing escape hatch from the suffocation usually associated with mainstream political discourse. It’s a pretty impressive balance.

For how long have you waited for an editorial cartoon–with mainstream accessibility–to point out the following:

(Check all that apply)

[ ] Most high-profile homophobes are probably gay (Matt keeps a list that’s about 2-score long)

[ ] The path to the Middle Class in America is arguably longer and harder than the path to citizenship

[ ] Despite being elected as the “anti-war candidate” against the GOP, Obama has continued the War on Terror, surged the troops in Afghanistan, NOT closed Guantanamo, and fully ushered in the era of drone-based warfare, currently occupying half a dozen countries in the Middle East / Central Asia.

[ ] Millenials, as a generation, aren’t “lazy”: they’re fucked (link goes to this gem of an essay, included in Matt’s book, posted on Matt’s website).

[ ]  Occupy wasn’t a bunch of hippies sitting in a drum circle, and “I am the 99%” wasn’t just an incredibly meaningful slogan thought up in between bong hits.

811

At this point you may be thinking, “Isn’t this supposed to be a book review?”

The book is Matt in 200 pages. It’s everything that he offers as a political cartoonist in both form and content. It’s editorial cartoons and comics journalism, satire and commentary, covering women’s rights, marriage equality, Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantanamo, gun control, elections, debates and popular [mis]conceptions about all of these things. It’s a powerful and enjoyable showcase that makes you wonder why NO ONE else is doing it like Matt is doing it. Matt made fun of me, more or less, when I described him like that before–I guess I just don’t know how else to say it.

Is there anything I disagree with Matt on?

His cartoon about Julian Assange, which focuses on the allegations of rape against the Wikileaks founder, to me, is like looking at Obama’s foreign policy today and trying to focus on the 2012 Benghazi Attack. My point? That’s it’s sooooo not the point. And yea, I’m a woman and I know all about non-consensual sexual encounters; and yea, there’s an American diplomat to Libya out there, listening to Steve King or Lindsay Graham, going, “Give me a fuckin’ break!”

One cartoon not doing it for me, out of a thousand, is acceptable.

Matt’s book, Life Begins at Incorporation, can be purchased online through Matt’s website.

If you’re like me and live in Toronto, you can find it through the Ad Astra Comix Distro, The Beguiling, The Comic Book Lounge, Hairy Tarantula, and The Silver Snail.

Almost American
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