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Review: Marvel’s Voices: Identity #1

Marvel Voices Identity #1

As a child growing up, I yearned to see myself in the entertainment I enjoyed. I remembered watching TV and movies and rarely saw an Asian face. When we did show up, we were mostly background players. Thankfully, I had Kung Fu Theater, but most of those movies came off cartoonish and were made in the 1960s and 1970s.

Fast forward to today and we are getting our first Asian superhero in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, while along the way, strides have been made across all media. We have had three Asian centered television shows to grace. We also have a boom of Asian creativity across the Diasporas that have never been seen before. On the precipice of the Shang Chi movie being released, Marvel has released the one-shot, Marvel’s Voices Identity #1, where the House Of Ideas showcase some of their greatest heroes which just so happens to be Asian.

In “What Is Vs What If”, Shang Chi is challenged by the alternate version of himself if chose not defy his father. In “That One Thing”, Jubilee visits her parents’ graves and revisits her childhood through memories. In “Jimmy Woo 1959”, Jimmy uses his genius to help an alien that almost gets killed by an Army battalion. In “Seeing Red”, Kamala Khan while visiting family helps the local hero in Karachi. In “Personal Heroes”, Wave fights a water monster in her hometown with a hero she idolizes, Bishop. In “Singular/Plural”, Silhouette agonizes over the dating scene, blaming her disability for meeting eligible men, but one encounter, leads her to realize she needs to step out of her own shadow. In “Traditional Pink Sushi”, Armor and Silver Samurai, argue over how to make sushi and eventually realizes traditions are something to be renewed. In the last story,” New York State of Mind”, Silk and Amadeus Cho gets their day off interrupted, as they get into a fight the scarecrow on top of the Statue of Liberty.

Overall, Marvel’s Voices Identity #1 is an entertaining set of stories which not only highlight these heroes but also the excellent creators. The stories by the different creators are wondrous. The art by the different artists are beautiful. Altogether, Marvel’s Voices Identity #1 is a comics which introduces readers to these heroes and these talented creators.

Story: Gene Luen Yang, Christina Strain, Maurene Goo, Greg Pak, Sabir Pirzada, Jeremy Holt, Alyssa Wong, Ken Niimura
Art: Marcus To, Sunny Gho, Jason Loo, Lynne Yoshii, Sebastian Cheng, Creees Lee, Brian Reber, Darren Shan, Mashal Ahmed, Neeraj Menon, Alti Firmansyah, Irma Kniivila, Whilce Portacio, Jay David Ramos, Ken Niimura
Story: 10 Story: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Preview: Nuclear Power #5

NUCLEAR POWER #5

Writers: Desirée Proctor & Erica Harrell
Artist: Lynne Yoshii
Publisher: Fanbase Press
$0.99 | 22 pages August 18, 2021
For Mature Readers
Purchase: comiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war.  Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it.  Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history of the Cuban Missile Crisis that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens.  When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

NUCLEAR POWER #5

Preview: Nuclear Power #5

NUCLEAR POWER #5

Writers: Desirée Proctor & Erica Harrell
Artist: Lynne Yoshii
Publisher: Fanbase Press
$0.99 | 22 pages August 18, 2021
For Mature Readers
Purchase: comiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war.  Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it.  Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history of the Cuban Missile Crisis that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens.  When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

NUCLEAR POWER #5

Marvel Reveals New Covers by Marvel’s Voices: Identity #1

On August 25th, Marvel will celebrate its most legendary Asian superheroes in Marvel’s Voices: Identity #1! The latest in a far-reaching lineup of one-shots designed to uplift marginalized voices and celebrate the diversity of Marvel Comics’ characters and creators, Marvel’s Voices: Identity #1 will be a thrilling collection of uplifting adventures starring Shang-Chi, Jubilee, Silk, Jimmy Woo, Ms. Marvel, Wave, Silhouette, Armor, and Silver Samurai. This highly anticipated issue will also boast a series of exciting new variant covers by an all-star lineup of artists including Peach Momoko’s spellbinding take on Nico Minoru, a gorgeous depiction of Marvel’s greatest fighter by InHyuk Lee, a celebration of some of mutantkind’s greatest stars by Uncanny X-Men artist Philip Tan, and covers by Mashal Ahmed and Rian Gonzales with a main cover by Jim Cheung.

Writers include Gene Luen Yang, Christina Strain, Maurene Goo, Greg Pak, Sabir Pirzada, Alyssa Wong, Jeremy Holt, and Ken Niimura. Artists include Marcus To, Jason Loo, Lynne Yoshii, Crees Lee, Mashal Ahmed, Whilce Portacio, Alti Firmansyah, and Ken Niimura.

Check out all six covers now and visit Marvel.com for a special sneak peek at the stories that await you when Marvel’s Voices: Identity #1 hits stands on August 25th!

Review: Nuclear Power #4

Nuclear Power #4

The truth has been revealed and soldiers of the American Union are set to clash with those cast off from society. Nuclear Power #4 delivers an entertaining chapter full of twists and turns as sides are chosen.

Nuclear Power #4 continues what has been an intriguing series that underneath feels like a not-so-veiled parable about choice, especially body autonomy. Desirée Proctor and Erica Harrell have crafted an interesting story that has delivered an alternate world where men make decisions for all, especially women. This issue, as well as the previous, feels like they’re starting to show what the world would look like if that wasn’t the case.

This issue is all about the confrontation between the American Union and variants. The bodies rise and tragedy mounts. It delivers a skirmish that feels scaled down in some ways keeping the series away from a massive battle that would probably feel like it doesn’t quite belong in the series.

Lynne Yoshii‘s art continues to impress. Yoshii’s art has a look that reminds me of Des Taylor, a little throwback in some ways and it works so well for the series. What’s great about the art is that it just fits the world so well with a balance between being “modern” and the throwback alternate world that it takes place in.

Nuclear Power #4 continues the excellent series with just two more issues left. We now know where the lines are and who has betrayed who. It’s been an interesting series that has delivered action, twists, and some interesting moral debates within. This is an alternate history that wants to teach us about our history and challenge or present.

Story: Desirée Proctor, Erica Harrell Art: Lynne Yoshii
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Fanbase Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology

Preview: Nuclear Power #3

Nuclear Power #3

Writers: Desirée Proctor & Erica Harrell (Deadshot: Mercy, 2017 DC Comics New Talent Workshop)
Artist: Lynne Yoshii (DC’s Gotham Garage, 2017 DC Comics New Talent Workshop)
Publisher:  Fanbase Press
$0.99 | 23 pages | Fanbase Press | June 16, 2021
For Mature Readers | Available on Hoopla & ComiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war.  Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it.  Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history of the Cuban Missile Crisis that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens.  When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

Nuclear Power #3

Review: Nuclear Power #2

Nuclear Power #2

Nuclear Power #2 delivers some answers to the mysteries set up in the first issue. It also adds so much danger and tension to the series. In the second issue, Claudia agrees to go with Reed and Iris in an effort to protect her patient, Lucy. Through that, we’re able to learn more about the Variants’ unnatural abilities and some of the secrets the American Union holds.

Desirée Proctor and Erica Harrell do a solid job of balancing the aspects of the comic. We get some solid action in an escape, some answers, and a setup of something nefarious. The trio of focuses really helps balance the second issue with a nice variation to the narrative.

What Nuclear Power #2 does really well is deliver some answers. It’d have been easy to drag out who the Variants are and what they want. Instead, the creative team gives us some answers. Though rather simple, they help set up the various sides and allows the reader to better understand who the villains are.

The issue is a little bumpy in one sense in the action sequence. After delivering some solid moments it just kind of shifts and we accept everyone escapes without really showing us how. With the way things were going, it’d have been nice to have seen that to give a bit more information about the sequence and the world. I found myself lingering on that aspect a bit more than I probably should have.

The art continues to be fantastic. Lynne Yoshii provides the art which feels like a cross between Des Taylor and Batman: The Animated Series. It’s a fantastic style and delivers a world that feels like there’s some thought put into it as to how it’d differ from ours. The issue feels like it falls a bit more into the Batman: The Animated Series side of the style, especially in the action and Variants. That’s a good thing as that show’s look is iconic and helps build out the details of the world.

Nuclear Power #2 is another solid issue. It’s really set things up well and I have no idea what direction it plans to go. It could easily veer into a more X-Men type story. It could also stick to its more grounded aspects of a world controlled by the military. Hopefully, it finds a nice balance between those as it’s done so far. There’s a lot to come based off this issue making this a series to really keep your eye on so you don’t miss out.

Story: Desirée Proctor, Erica Harrell Art: Lynne Yoshii
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Fanbase Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology

Preview: Nuclear Power #2

NUCLEAR POWER #2

Writers: Desirée Proctor & Erica Harrell
Artist: Lynne Yoshii
Publisher: Fanbase Press
$0.99 | 23 pages | Fanbase Press | May 19, 2021
For Mature Readers | Available on Hoopla & comiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war.  Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it.  Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history of the Cuban Missile Crisis that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens.  When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

NUCLEAR POWER #2

Review: Nuclear Power #1

Nuclear Power #1

Nuclear Power #1 is a very unexpected debut that’s thought-provoking and somewhat shocking. The alternate history kicks off with the Cuban Missile Crisis and instead of a de-escalation, an exchange takes place devastating the United States. Taking place 60 years later, the US is now the American Union comprised of thirteen states and governed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Their military rule governs and helps rebuild society while protecting the survivors. Nuclear radiation has impacted society enhancing some but also making birth difficult for others.

With a story by Desirée Proctor and Erica Harrell, Nuclear Power #1 is an intriguing debut. Its themes touch upon so much including liberty, the pursuit of happiness, and the right to life. Yes, abortion is at the center of the comic in many ways but the right to life extends beyond that to the survivors beyond a wall built to protect the American Union.

But, what stands out to be about Nuclear Power #1 are the small details. The world has been fleshed out with the impact of the alternate history playing a major role. Things like the Civil Rights movement wouldn’t have played out. The women’s rights movement of the 1960s and 70s as well would not have happened. The result is both a forward (in some ways) society and a backward one.

In the American Union, abortion is used regularly to terminate pregnancies impacted by radiation. Women though are clearly seen as second class in some ways who have an important role in helping repopulate the American Union. But, women also hold high ranks in the military infrastructure but also are called “emotional” in being dressed down. There’s an interesting mix of attitudes within the comic, one that’s fascinating to think about and deconstruct. Without social movements, in a military-focused and controlled society, how would things evolve as a society? Nuclear Power #1 delivers some thoughts concerning that.

The art by Lynne Yoshii is fantastic. The comic sticks to a black, red, and off-white coloring and style that evokes propaganda posters of the past. The style is very reminiscent of Des Taylor, a high compliment, and it works so well. While the page layouts mainly stick to various combinations of panels, there’s a focus on facial expressions that add a weight of emotion to the story. Like the society itself, there’s a focus on details that add to the story as well. The dress and technology feel like a throwback but also not quite as antiquated as the 1960s. There’s some small advancement but not a jump to what we’d expect in today’s world. There’s a focus on the military dress that presents a clean and organized society, stiff in many ways.

Nuclear Power #1 is a hell of a start. The alternate history story feels relevant in many ways and delivers a focus on details that’s unexpected and very welcomed. It’s a series that feels well-thought-out. The art has a sense to it that’s both beautiful and off-putting to look at. The comic as a whole gives a sense of order but something’s off. It’s a deliver that sucks you in making you want to find out more and explore the deeper meanings of what the comic is trying to deliver.

Story: Desirée Proctor, Erica Harrell Art: Lynne Yoshii
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Fanbase Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology

Preview: Nuclear Power #1

NUCLEAR POWER #1

Writers: Desirée Proctor & Erica Harrell (Deadshot: Mercy, 2017 DC Comics New Talent Workshop)
Artist: Lynne Yoshii (DC’s Gotham Garage, 2017 DC Comics New Talent Workshop)
Publisher:  Fanbase Press
$0.99 | 28 pages | Fanbase Press | April 21, 2021
For Mature Readers | Available on Hoopla & ComiXology

October of 1962. The Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union is at its peak when the unthinkable happens: nuclear war.  Sixty years later, the remaining 13 states rose from the ashes to form the American Union, governed by the authoritarian Joint Chiefs of Staff and protected by a border wall to keep out nuclear radiation . . . and the individuals who were enhanced by it.  Nuclear Power is a darkly poignant alternate history of the Cuban Missile Crisis that posits the lengths to which a government will go to protect (or deceive) its citizens.  When the Joint Chiefs’ dark secrets are revealed, will survivors on both sides of the wall join forces to fight for their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or will their differences forever divide them?

Almost American
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