Tag Archives: leila del duca

Review: The Long Con #1

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got the longest con ever!

The Long Con #1 is by Dylan Meconis, Ben Coleman, EA Denich, M. Victoria Robado, Aditya Bidikar, Leila Del Duca, Sara Richard, Keith Wood, Robin Herrera, and Ari Yarwood.

Get your copy in comic shops today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

 

Oni Press provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: The Long Con #1

The Long Con #1

(W) Dylan Meconis and Ben Coleman
(A) EA Denich
(C) M. Victoria Robado
(CA) EA Denich with M. Victoria Robado (Cover A), Leila Del Duca (Cover B)
Age Rating: Teen, 16+
Genre: Humor, Action/Adventure
Price: $3.99
Page Count: 32

Five years ago, a cataclysmic event obliterated everything within a fifty mile radius of the Los Spinoza Convention Center—including the attendees of Long Con, the world’s biggest (and longest) comic convention. But unknown to the outside world, the con-goers not only survived, they kept the convention going. When proof of their survival surfaces, reporter Victor Lai is sent to investigate—after all, he was covering the con that fateful day and escaped mere minutes before everything went kablooie… abandoning his nerdy pal Dez in the process. So clearly he’s the perfect person for the job, and he won’t get trapped inside like some kinda idiot. Right?

Courtly intrigue and fantasy romance combine in Sleepless, Vol. 1

Writer Sarah Vaughn, artist Leila del Duca, colorist/editor Alissa Sallah, and letterer Deron Bennett will release Sleepless, Vol. 1 this July from Image Comics.

In the kingdom of Harbeny, Lady “Poppy” Pyppenia is kept safe by her faithful Sleepless Knight, Cyrenic. But when a new king is crowned, an assassin makes an attempt on her life. As Poppy and Cyrenic work to discover who wants her dead, they must navigate the dangerous waters of life at court—and of their growing feelings for one another.

Sleepless, Vol. 1 (ISBN: 978-1-5343-0684-4, Diamond code: MAY180073) will hit comics shops on Wednesday, July 11th and bookstores on Tuesday, July 17th.

Review: Shade the Changing Girl Vol. 2: Little Runaway

It’s Tuesday which means it’s new comic book day at book stores! This week we’ve got Shade!

Shade the Changing Girl Vol. 2: Little Runaway collects issues #7-12 by Cecil Castellucci, Marley Zarcone, Marguerite Sauvage, Ande Parks, Dan Parent, Audrey Mok, Brittney Williams, Leila Del Duca, Katie Jones, and Becky Cloonan.

Get your copy. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Sarah Vaughn, Leila del Duca, Alissa Sallah, and Deron Bennett Team Up for the YA Fantasy Sleepless

Writer Sarah Vaughn teams up with artist Leila del Duca, editor/colorist Alissa Sallah, and letterer Deron Bennett for the fantasy romance series Sleepless this December.

Lady “Poppy” Pyppenia, daughter of a king, is ever guarded by the devoted Sleepless Knight Cyrenic. But a new king has just been crowned—and danger lurks anew around each and every corner.

Sleepless #1, Cover A by Leila del Duca and Alissa Sallah (Diamond code: OCT170590) and Cover B by Jen Bartel (Diamond code: OCT170591), hits comic book shops Wednesday, December 6th. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, November 13th.

Review: Shade the Changing Girl #10

Shade10CoverOpening with a historical prologue where Shade witnesses Robert Oppenheimer’s first atomic test, Shade the Changing Girl #10 continues this second story arc’s road trip feel as our protagonist looks for the house of Honey Rich from her favorite Cold War era Earth sitcom Life with HoneyCecil Castellucci’s plot continues to flit from location to location while Marley Zarcone gets to apply her bendy, trippy approach to art to a Metan vs. Metan action scene with help from inker Ande Parks. Everything is topped off with a nuclear-meets-semitones color palette from Kelly Fitzpatrick.

Shade  the Changing Girl uses the vessel of an alien girl trekking across America to explore what it means to be human on both a sad and whimsical level. There’s a wonderful double page spread from Zarcone of a Life with Honey themed board game that instantly brought back memories of playing a Leave It to Beaver board game on a family vacation at a cozy cabin in the California wilderness. It’s a moment of real happiness and nostalgia divorced from real world context. Kid Logan didn’t really know about McCarthyism, the Hays Code, or Cold War, but just old black and white sitcoms shown on TV Land (Which shows Scrubs now.) and stories from my grandparents.

In the character of Shade, Castellucci successfully imitates this limited perspective on the world that we have as kids as she is utterly heartbroken when she shows up to “Honey Rich’s house” and is promptly shown the door by an angry relative. It’s like when I discovered the music of Elvis through the movie Lilo and Stitch, wanted to go to Graceland and meet him, and then was told that he’d been dead for decades. Her Shadeinteriorcoping mechanism is very adult though as she ends up at a local bar drinking with a couple sad old men that she has chirping like birds thanks to the power of the madness vest. This kind of whiplash from very childlike behavior to adult ennui kind of nails what it means to be a young person in 2017 as I go from dusting off the old Nintendo 64 to navigating the world of health insurance in the same hour.

But Shade isn’t just about Shade. There are oodles of storylines featuring her old high school friends River and Teacup, her Metan pursuers, her old boyfriend LePuck, a government agency, and even Honey Rich herself. It’s like each page is telling a different story all skillfully connected by Rac Shade’s epigrammatic poetry and Shade’s wise-beyond-her-years narration. River is a great supporting character and still cares for Shade even though she left down in a dramatic fashion and has everyone worried. His piecing together clues through news reports and using the Internet to track and follow her is an excellent real world version of Shade’s own ability to use the M-Vest to travel through space and time in the blink of an eye.

Shade the Changing Girl #10 has a four page action scene because another issue of nameless Metan pursuers fiddling around and trying to find her would be boring. However, Castellucci, Zarcone, and Fitzpatrick make the fight quite clever like a bar fight meets a ballet with bonus vaporizing guns that go pink and blue. Shade looks human, but she moves with a madness using a shot glass as a deadly weapon instead of her fists. It all climaxes in an atomic pink panel where Shade goes from girl to weapon and walks away guilty among the grey bodies. She critiqued atomic weapons and nukes in the beginning of the comic, but now has become one and even caused collateral damage. There are lines on her face, and the madness vest looks less trippy cool and more ragged like she has aged decades in a single page.

The backup story in Shade the Changing Girl #10 is a darkly hilarious story of fallout shelter and songs that mask the fear behind nuclear war courtesy of Honey Rich and her best friend Carmen. Leila Del Duca nails the fashions of the 1950s and draws faces that seem ignorant, but are actually wise perfect for the tone of this satire disguised as a period piece sitcom.

Shade the Changing Girl #10 is another beautiful installment of Cecil Castellucci, Marley Zarcone, Ande Parks, and Kelly Fitzpatrick’s comic as Shade wrestles with nostalgia, reality, and death through bar fights, sitcoms, and national parks.

Story: Cecil Castellucci Art: Marley Zarcone
Inks: Ande Parks Colors: Kelly Fitzpatrick
Backup Art: Leila Del Duca
Story: 9 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.7 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics/Young Animal provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Mosaic #7

Mosaic #7

(W) Geoffrey Thorne (A) Bruno Oliveira (CA) Leila del Duca
Rated T
In Shops: Apr 12, 2017
SRP: $3.99

Mosaic delves deeper into his powers with the help of the Inhumans! But the Brand Corporation isn’t done with him yet!

Travel Afar with Leila del Duca, Kit Seaton, and Image in March

Writer Leila del Duca teams up with artist Kit Seaton for the coming-of-age fantasy tale AFAR, coming this March from Image Comics.

In a fantastical postindustrial desert, fifteen-year-old Boetema suddenly develops the ability to astrally project to other planets while she sleeps. When she accidentally gets a young man hurt on a planet light-years away, she must figure out a way to project back to save him. On her own world, Boetema’s parents have temporarily left her and her thirteen-year-old brother, Inotu, to make a living as salt shepherds. Left to their own devices, the two siblings must flee across a dangerous desert when Inotu gets into trouble with a threatening cyborg bodyguard. As Boetema visits amazing planets and encounters vibrant cultures, she must confront her mistakes and learn to trust in Inotu as she navigates her newfound abilities.

AFAR OGN (ISBN: 978-1-63215-941-0) hits comic book stores on Wednesday, March 29th and bookstores on Tuesday, April 4th.

afar-1

Madison’s Favorite Comics of 2016

Last year I prioritized cutting back on cape books and diversifying the publishers and stories that I read. Though many of the comics I read weren’t published in 2016 (especially ones I read during Women’s History Month) I still found it hard to narrow down the list of ongoing series I particularly loved throughout the year.

Here are ten comics I couldn’t put down in 2016:

goldie vance #1 featured

10. Goldie Vance by Hope Larson and Brittney Williams

This is a series I would have loved as a child. Goldie is the perfect mix of Nancy Drew and Eloise (of Plaza fame). Goldie Vance is great for a younger audience but doesn’t shy away from emotionally complex stories. Goldie and her friends are well-rounded characters with a wide range of interests who readers–young and not-young alike–will be able to relate to.

elasticator #1 featured

9. Elasticator by Alan C. Medina and Kevin Shah

Elasticator is the kind of smart, political superhero comic I wish was more prevalent. The writing is fresh and interesting and Shah’s art is lively and animated with great colors from Ross A. Campbell.

Snotgirl

8. Snotgirl by Bryan Lee O’Malley and Leslie Hung

Lottie Person is just about as far away from Scott Pilgrim as you could get, though they do, at times, share a similar self-absorption. Snotgirl quickly became one of my favorite series of the year, because while not many people can say they’re successful fashion bloggers, they can likely relate to Lottie’s personal problems. Leslie Hung and Mickey Quinn provide gorgeous, vibrant visuals and the best wardrobe in comics, to boot.

welcome back 1 featured

7. We(l)come Back by Christopher Sebela and Claire Roe

Reincarnation? Check. Assassins? Check. Shadowy organizations? Check. A+ fashion choices? Check. Reincarnated assassins in love running from other assassins who are trying to assassinate them? …Also check. What more can you want from a story?

shutter #18 featured

6. Shutter by Joe Keatinge and Leila del Duca

Shutter is one of Image’s most underrated titles. The story follows Kate Kristopher, the daughter of legendary explorer Chris Kristopher, and her discovery of some little-known family history. The comic is consistently interesting not only because of its plot, but because del Duca and colorist Owen Gieni are constantly experimenting with narrative structure and using different techniques to influence how the story is read.

clean room 1 featured

5. Clean Room by Gail Simone and Jon Davis-Hunt

Clean Room is a creepy psychological horror comic about journalist Chloe Pierce’s investigation of self-help master Astrid Mueller, who Pierce suspects is more cult leader than anything else. Or is she? Mueller is a fascinating character, and the unknowable question of which side she’s actually on only adds to the story’s suspense.

the-wicked-the-divine-24-featured

4. The Wicked + The Divine by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie

What if you could be a god, but you’d die within two years? Consistently equal parts entertaining and heartbreaking with consistently incredible art and color from Jamie McKelvie and Matt Wilson. You’ve probably heard of this one.

mockingbirdyas

3. Mockingbird by Chelsea Cain, Kate Niemczyk, Sean Parsons, and Ibrahim Moustafa

One of the few superhero comics I read this year, Mockingbird was one of my absolute favorites. Cain writes Bobbi Morse as confident and smart, and the result was a fun mystery thriller with gorgeous art. The series also featured some of my favorite colors and covers this year, by Rachelle Rosenberg and Joelle Jones.

By the time I write my 2017 list, I might be over Mockingbird’s cancellation.

bitch planet 2 b

2. Bitch Planet by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Val DeLandro

2016 was light on Bitch Planet–only four issues were released throughout the year–but continued to provide insightful and relevant commentary in what turned out to be a period of rapid change in the real-life political landscape.

monstress-7-featured

1. Monstress by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda

Monstress started strong in 2015 and only got better. The main character, Maika, is a teenage girl living with a monster inside, something she learns to live with and use to her advantage as the plot develops. Monstress is full of unrepentant female characters set in a stunningly rendered fantasy world.

Shutter #25 Crossover Event: Special Brandon Graham Variant Cover Revealed

Image Comics has revealed Brandon Graham’s special variant cover of Shutter #25, the highly anticipated crossover event in the fan-favorite series written by Joe Keatinge and illustrated by Leila del Duca.

For those that missed it, Shutter #25 will celebrate the 25 year history of Image Comics.

Shutter #25 Cover A by Leila del Duca and Owen Gieni, as well as Shutter #25 Cover B by Brandon Graham, will hit comic book stores Wednesday, December 28th. Final order cutoff deadline for retailers is Monday, December 5th.

shutter-25-crossover-event-special-brandon-graham-variant

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