Tag Archives: isis

Around the Tubes

It’s a new week, and we’re recovering from Awesome Con! Expect some photos and general thoughts for the third year of the convention.

While you wait for that, here’s some news to keep you busy.

Around the Tubes

CBLDF – Iran Combats ISIS With Cartoon Contest – Very cool to see and hear about!

Calgary Herald – Hundreds of comic books stolen in break-and-enter – Horrible news. If anyone has any information that can help, do come forward.

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

The Beat – Old Man Logan #1

Around the Tubes

It’s a new week, and new week for comics! Tonight we’re talking Marvel and Netflix‘s Daredevil on Graphic Policy Radio. You should listen in. Until then, check out the news you might have missed below.

Around the Tubes

BBC News – Islamic State: Fighting fundamentalism with comic strips – There’s a lot of comics being used.

The Outhousers – WITNESS: Comic Book “Artist” Kurt Busiek Battles the Forces of GamerGate – Good documentation about the absurdity of it all.

Bleeding Cool – Frank Cho Donates $1000 Sale Of Spider-Gwen Art To Domestic Violence Charity – Good on him!

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

MoviePilot – Batman Beyond 2.0 Volume Two: Justice Lords Beyond

Talking Comics – Bloodshot Reborn #1

Comics Alliance – Jupiter’s Circle #1

The Battle Against ISIS with Comics

Suleiman Bakhit, speaking at the TEDGlobal 2011 TED Fellows Talks, Monday, July 11, 2011, in Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo: James Duncan Davidson / TED

Suleiman Bakhit, speaking at the TEDGlobal 2011 TED Fellows Talks, Monday, July 11, 2011, in Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo: James Duncan Davidson / TED

While bombs are being dropped, and bullets are flying in an attempt to stop Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), others are taking a more peaceful approach to shape the hearts and minds of those on the ground.

Suleiman Bakhit is a Jordanian social activist who thinks we can fight the terrorist organization with comics books. Bakhit thinks that narratives and myths are a key. Bakhit thinks that a toxic shame is a lot of what drives the violence.

In an interview with Wired.com UK, he explained:

Healthy shame is a source of learning, it lets you know boundaries. Toxic shame says you are unworthy as a human being, you are unworthy of human connection. This leads to violence in an attempt to replace that toxic shame with pride.

After Bakhit began publishing his own comics, he was attacked with a razor blade by extremists.

I had to cauterise my own wound with a piece of steel. But two good things came out of this. One, my dating life improved exponentially. And the second thing was that I realised that they were trying to mark me with shame, to transfer their own shame to me, and replace it with pride.

The idea of taking on the terrorists with comics came from asking kids who their heroes were. When first asked, they named people seen in extremist propaganda. Bakhit then gave out free comic books. Three months later, those extremists were replaced with comic book characters. The simple issue as he sees it, a huge need for positive role models and positive narratives. Fight extremist propaganda with a counter mythology filled with men and women, and most importantly make it positive and personal.

Bakhit ended his interview with this thought to ending the extremism.

The best way to accomplish this. The best technology we have to cultivate heroic motivation is this medium right here. The comic book.

ISIS Calls for the Killing of the Creator of The 99

Dr. Nayef Al-Mutawa has 99 problems and ISIS is one. The creator of the comic/cartoon series The 99 has been deemed “slanderous to Islam” by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria as well as Al-Qaeda. The terrorist group has taken to social media calling for the assassination of the creator. Al-Mutawa has defended the work, even going so far as receiving clearance from sharia scholars who said the comics do not insult Allah or Islam.

Al-Mutawa is taking the threats seriously, going as far as seeking legal action against those behind the Twitter account. The Kuwait Times even said:

The head of the Human Rights Basic Elements Society Dr Yousef Al-Sager stressed that such fatwas must be issued by courts because it is very dangerous to follow fatwas from such anonymous social media accounts.

The comic was created to present a positive portrayal of Muslims, and provide Muslim children positive role models with each character embodying a pillar of the religion.

In March, the series received a fatwa against it and in February the series was highlighted in a positive way by the United States’ State Department. When the series launched it was attacked by the right as a way to indoctrinate children into Islam among other claims.

We hope Al-Mutawa remains safe and sound.