Tag Archives: geoffrey thorne

Explore Truth & Justice in a New Digital First Anthology Series from DC

Truth and justice are two words associated with one of DC‘s most iconic superheroes and this January it’s the foundation of an all-new anthology comic book series, Truth & Justice. The anthology will explore the length and breadth of DC’s rich character history. In addition, the series will serve as a platform for new, emerging storytellers to reveal their takes on popular DC characters.

Truth & Justice debuts digitally on January 8, 2021, with the first of three 99-cent weekly stories, which will be collected as a 40-page print issue available February 16, 2021. Vixen makes her Truth & Justice entrance in a story written by Geoffrey Thorne, with art by Chris Cross, and Jordi Tarragona.

Mari McCabe is many things: superhero, model, activist; but can she add god-killer to the list? Vixen teams up with Dr. Mist and Impala of the Global Guardians to face down an ancient deity that’s taken over the body of a scientist investigating powerful magical artifacts. Vixen will need to dig deep and use all the abilities in the animal kingdom to face down this powerful primeval threat!

Subsequent installments of Truth & Justice will showcase the heart and spirit of the wide-ranging characters featured across DC’s Multiverse. With an endless array of characters to choose from—heroes, villains, aliens, animals—you name it, we have it!

Knull’s Darkness Overtakes the X-Men in King in Black #4

The war against Knull erupts on December 2nd in King in Black #1, the shocking new chapter in Donny Cates and Ryan Stegman’s game-changing run on Venom. In February, Knull’s influence continues to spread, ensnaring the entire planet in the darkness of his reign. Outgunned and outmanned, the heroes of the Marvel Universe will unite like never before. Will the combined force of Eddie Brock, the Avengers, the X-Men, the Fantastic Four, and more be enough to turn the tide of this devastating conflict? Find out in February’s King in Black #4 as well as newly announced King in Black one-shots and tie-ins coming your way!

Steve Rogers is joined by Winter Soldier and Falcon in a brutal brawl against Knull’s forces in the streets of New York City in writer Danny Lore and artist Mirko Colak’s King in Black: Captain America. Kate Pryde leads the Marauders in a dangerous rescue mission on the high seas in writer Gerry Duggan and artist Luke Ross’ King in Black: Marauders! Wakanda will need its king more than ever when Knull sets his sights on it in King in Black: Black Panther by writer Geoffrey Thorne and artist Germán Peralta. The Fantastic Four and the Unseen (AKA Nick Fury) enter the fray in Fantastic Four #29 by writer Dan Slott and artist Ze Carlos.

Check out the cover of King in Black #4 below and find out if the Marvel Universe has what it takes to repel Knull’s unrelenting darkness when the event kicks off next month!

KING IN BLACK #4 (OF 5)

Written by DONNY CATES
Art and Cover by RYAN STEGMAN

WHAT’S A GOD TO A KING?

KING IN BLACK #4 (OF 5)

KING IN BLACK: CAPTAIN AMERICA #1

Written by DANNY LORE
Art by MIRKO COLAK
Cover by SALVADOR LARROCA

Captain America is in a brutal battle to win the streets of Manhattan back from Knull’s forces, aided by the Winter Soldier and the Falcon…but there’s a darkness inside Steve that he’s struggling to shake. Can his closest friends help him through, or will he succumb to the shadows? Danny Lore (IRONHEART 2020) and Mirko Colak (DEADPOOL, PUNISHER) join forces for a twisted and terrifying story at the heart of the war against Knull!

KING IN BLACK: CAPTAIN AMERICA #1

KING IN BLACK: MARAUDERS #1

Written by GERRY DUGGAN 
Art by LUKE ROSS 
Cover by RUSSELL DAUTERMAN

THE QUEEN IN RED SAILS!

Red Queen Kate Pryde and her crew of Marauders set sail against the forces of Knull! Captain Kate has pledged to fight for the needy, and a global disaster like this one gives plenty of folks in need.

KING IN BLACK: MARAUDERS #1

KING IN BLACK: BLACK PANTHER #1

Written by GEOFFREY THORNE
Art by GERMÁN PERALTA
Cover by LEINIL FRANCIS YU

SYMBIOTES INVADE THE UNCONQUERABLE COUNTRY OF WAKANDA!

T’Challa’s most treasured allies are lost in a storm of Knull’s making in this wild one-shot! Critically acclaimed writer, actor and producer Geoffrey Thorne explores a Wakanda gone dark — invaded by Knull’s massive symbiote army. Wakanda needs its king. It needs the Black Panther. But once again, the hero must choose between his role as an Avenger, his role as a king…and the yearnings of his heart.

KING IN BLACK: BLACK PANTHER #1

FANTASTIC FOUR #29

Written by DAN SLOTT
Art by ZE CARLOS
Cover by MARK BROOKS

“BONDING TIME.”

In the middle of the chaos that is KING IN BLACK…a symbiote bonds with a member of Marvel’s First Family!

Also in this issue, the Unseen is putting together a squadron for a secret mission in deep space.

FANTASTIC FOUR #29

DC Officially Announces Future State, a Two-Month Line Wide Event

DC Comics is kicking off 2021 with a look into the future with DC Future State. The rumored line-wide event has been revealed today. It kicks off in January 2021 and goes through 2021. DC Future State features a combination of monthly and twice-monthly oversize anthologies, as we well as a miniseries and one-shots,

DC Future State spotlights the World’s Greatest Super Heroes in fresh new roles, with all-new characters taking up their iconic mantles. DC Future State features an incredible array of creative talent, combining award-winning writers and artists with new voices from the worlds of TV, movies, and animation. In March 2021, the regular DC title lineup resumes, continuing existing storylines from 2020 and introducing new arcs for the year.

In DC Future State, the Multiverse has been saved from the brink of destruction, but the triumph of DC’s heroes has shaken loose the very fabric of time and space! The final chapter of Dark Nights: Death Metal (on sale January 5, 2021)  brings new life to DC’s Multiverse, kicking off this glimpse into the unwritten worlds of DC’s future!

A stellar array of writers and artists are on hand to deliver this unique look at beloved DC characters, including fan favorites such as Mariko Tamaki, Brian Michael Bendis, Gene Luen Yang, Joëlle Jones, Joshua Williamson, Nicola Scott, Cully Hamner, and John Timms, along with new voices such as award-winning screenwriter John Ridley (12 Years A Slave), Brandon Vietti (Young Justice), Meghan Fitzmartin (SupernaturalDC Super Hero Girls), Brandon Easton (Thundercats, Transformers: War for Cybertron), Alitha Martinez (REPRESENT! It’s A Bird!), L.L. McKinney (Nubia: Real One), Paula Sevenbergen (Stargirl), and Siya Oum (Lola XOXO), among others.

Check out below to see what the future beholds!

Batman Family

In this future, Gotham City is controlled by the Magistrate. This villainous regime has taken control of the city, now under constant surveillance. All masked vigilantes have been outlawed and Batman has been killed. But led by an all-new Batman, a new assembly of Gotham’s guardians rise to give hope to all of those who lost it!

Oversized Comics:

Future State: The Next Batman #1-4

  • The Next Batman, by John Ridley, Nick Derington and Laura Braga
  • Outsiders, by Brandon Thomas and Sumit Kumar
  • Arkham Knights, by Paul Jenkins and Jack Herbert
  • Batgirls, by Vita Ayala and Aneke
  • Gotham City Sirens, by Paula Sevenbergen and Emanuela Lupacchino

Future State: Dark Detective #1-4

  • Dark Detective, by Mariko Tamaki and Dan Mora
  • Grifters, by Matthew Rosenberg and Carmine di Giandomenico
  • Red Hood, by Joshua Williamson and Giannis Milonogiannis

Monthly Miniseries:

  • Future State: Batman/Superman, by Gene Luen Yang and Ben Oliver
  • Future State: Catwoman, by Ram V and Otto Schmidt
  • Future State: Harley Quinn, by Stephanie Phillips and Simone Di Meo
  • Future State: Nightwing, by Andrew Constant and Nicola Scott
  • Future State: Robin Eternal, by Meghan Fitzmartin and Eddy Barrows
Superman Family

Due to his involvement in an international crisis happening in the near future, Clark Kent has been rejected by Earth, causing him to focus his lifesaving efforts outside his adopted home. He travels to Warworld to rise through the ranks of gladiatorial combat in order to defeat Mongul with the help of some unlikely heroes. Back in Metropolis, Clark’s son Jon has taken on the mantle of Superman. After seeing the horrors that befell Gotham, he bottles Metropolis in order to keep it safe, putting him at odds with Supergirl.

Connecting the two oversized Future State: Superman titles, Shilo Norman, the man known as Mister Miracle, finds himself caught between the city he grew up in and the battle-torn planet that could be his downfall.

Meanwhile in the Amazon rainforest, Yara Flor is chosen to be the new Wonder Woman. Years later, the new Superman and Wonder Woman join forces to save their cities in a new superhero team-up the likes of which the world has never seen.

Oversized Comics:

Future State: Superman of Metropolis #1-2

  • Superman of Metropolis, by Sean Lewis and John Timms
  • The Guardian, by Sean Lewis and Cully Hamner
  • Mister Miracle, by Brandon Easton and Valentine De Landro
Future State: Superman of Metropolis #1-2

Future State: Superman: Worlds of War #1-4

  • Superman: Worlds of War, by Phillip Kennedy Johnson and Mikel Janin
  • Midnighter, by Becky Cloonan, Michael W. Conrad and Gleb Melnikov
  • Black Racer, by Jeremy Adams and Siya Oum
  • Mister Miracle, by Brandon Easton and Valentine De Landro
Future State: Superman: Worlds of War #1-4

Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #1-2

  • Immortal Wonder Woman, by Becky Cloonan, Michael W. Conrad and Jen Bartel
  • Nubia, by L.L. McKinney, Alitha E. Martinez and Mark Morales
Future State: Immortal Wonder Woman #1-2

Monthly Miniseries and One-Shots

  • Future State: House of El, by Phillip Kennedy Johnson and Scott Godlewski (one-shot on sale February)
  • Future State: Kara Zor-El, Superwoman, by Marguerite Bennett and Marguerite Sauvage
  • Future State: Legion of Super-Heroes, by Brian Michael Bendis and Riley Rossmo
  • Future State: Superman/Wonder Woman, by Dan Watters and Leila del Duca
  • Future State: Superman vs. Imperious Lex, by Mark Russell and Steve Pugh (3-issue series ending March 2021)
  • Future State: Wonder Woman, by Joëlle Jones
Justice League Family

A thread of great change runs through the Justice League heroes: a new League is built upon secret identities (even from each other), but an old and evolved enemy will use these secrets to try and overthrow the world. For the supernatural heroes of Justice League Dark, the very fabric of reality has shifted, and heroes are being hunted.

For Flash, Shazam, and the Teen Titans, it all begins when the four Riders of the Apocalypse unleash hell in a battle at Titans Academy, Barry Allen is cut off from the Speed Force, a Famine-controlled Wally West may be beyond saving, and Billy Batson makes a deal with the devil that will change Shazam forever. Off-world, John Stewart and the remaining Green Lanterns are stranded in the shadow of a dead power battery; Jackson Hyde and Andy Curry are separated across the galaxy; and Amanda Waller executes her ultimate plan with a new but terrifyingly familiar Suicide Squad on Earth-3.

At the end of time, Swamp Thing reveals its true intention, ruling supreme until a remnant of humanity launches a rebellion, and Black Adam looks to the past as the only way to save the future of the Multiverse.

Oversized Comics:

Future State: Justice League #1-2

  • Justice League, by Joshua Williamson and Robson Rocha
  • Justice League Dark, by Ram V and Marcio Takara
Future State: Justice League #1

Future State: Green Lantern #1-2

  • Last Lanterns, by Geoffrey Thorne and Tom Raney
  • Tales of the Green Lantern Corps, by Josie Campbell, Ryan Cady and Ernie Altbacker, with Sami Basri and Clayton Henry
Future State: Green Lantern #1

Future State: Suicide Squad #1-2

  • Suicide Squad, by Robbie Thompson and Javi Fernandez
  • Black Adam, by Jeremy Adams and Fernando Pasarin
Future State: Suicide Squad #1

Monthly Miniseries:

  • Future State: Aquaman, by Brandon Thomas and Daniel Sampere
  • Future State: The Flash, by Brandon Vietti and Dale Eaglesham
  • Future State: Teen Titans, by Tim Sheridan and Rafa Sandoval
  • Future State: SHAZAM!, by Tim Sheridan and Eduardo Pansica
  • Future State: Swamp Thing, by Ram V and Mike Perkins

Review: Winterman Comics #3

Winterman Comics

Muscle memory to me is a fascinating thing. There may be things you have done since childhood that you automatically remember right away. I’ve seen this throughout my life in multiple situations. It’s kind of cool and kind of spooky, but nonetheless intriguing.

One time I saw in the military, where something somebody I worked with had not done something in ten years but he remembered how to do it like riding a bike. Then one time, my Dad drove to a place he had not seen in 20 something years but knew the way like it was nothing and this was before GPS. Memory recall goes with those actions, as the person remembers exactly when they last did it.  Geoff Thorne unravels our hero’s origins in the third chapter to his book, Winterman Comics.

We’re taken back to Other Country, where our hero is still in the fight with the Merk but is soon overwhelmed. . As we find Kally waking up as her younger self, naïve and untested.  Kally eventually sees her sister and her brother, who both are reticent of what has happened. By the issue’s end, we find out our hero is in some type of dream state as her present is converging with her stasis.

Overall, a great third chapter which raises the stakes for our protagonist. The story by Thorne is delightful. The art by Thorne is graceful. Altogether, a story that seeks to be unique.

Story: Geoff Thorne Art: Geoff Thorne
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Winterman Comics #1

Winterman Comics

Who doesn’t like to read about new heroes, people that capture our imagination?As most heroes are simply extensions of their creators. As their imaginations lead them to some fun places. Though we have enjoyed the many different created universes throughout comics, it is alarming, the marginalization of POC creators.

The mere absence of the many creators who could have crafted worlds we would have enjoyed for years is simply sad. Even the most well known Black comic book character right now, Black Panther, was created by 2 white creators.  As we never saw the mainstream vision of Black heroes by black creators until 1993, when Milestone Comics was founded. Geoff Thorne unleashes a new universe of heroes starting with a fierce water-friendly hero in the first chapter to his book, Winterman Comics.

We are taken to a place called Other Country, where our hero is looking for some R&R. We find her in her natural habitat and spending time with old acquaintances. She finds out that her once peaceful home has come under attack from one of her neighbors forcing her into action and a search for vengeance.

Overall, a great first issue that shows heroes are also needed at home. The story by Thorne is mesmeric. The art by Thorne is graceful. Altogether, a story that boils with excitement.

Story: Geoff Thorne Art: Geoff Thorne
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall:9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Marvel’s Voices #1

Marvel's Voices #1

Marvel’s Voices is an Experience, capital E. It’s the first comic I know about that adapts the concept of a podcast into a comics anthology collecting stories from black creators giving their take on the Marvel universe.

The book’s title carries over from the podcast it’s based on, which is hosted by Angélique Roché. The list of creators includes Vita Ayala, Damion Scott, Kyle Baker, Brian Stelfreeze, Roxane Gay, Method Man, Alitha Martínez, among other notable industry names. What’s interesting about the project, though, is that it embraces its multimedia roots by featuring essays from other creators accessible via Marvel’s Voices online page.

Two particular essays grabbed my attention: Regine L. Sawyer’s “Growing Up Marvel” and Karama Horne’s “The Legacy of Isaiah Bradley: The First Black Captain America.” (Disclosure: Karama and Regine have both contributed to our site – ed.)

Sawyer’s essay is about her origin story into comics through a less conventional avenue than most other stories of the kind: X-Men trading cards. I don’t want to spoil the essay because it is a fascinating and well-written story, but it is wonderful to get this look at how comics allow for multiple entry points given it’s an entire cultural package. It made me remember my card collecting days growing up, both the same X-Men cards Sawyer collected and the classic Pepsi Cards I religiously hunted down back when they came out in Puerto Rico. I still have them with me and they also helped me embrace comics.

Horne’s essay is about two comics: Truth and The Crew. Each one stands as some of Marvel’s best comic book offerings. They were subversive and hard-hitting, daring enough to give Marvel a black Captain America (in Truth), complete with an exploration of the tragic treatment black heroes get using real-life black history as the basis for the problems each character faces (which is expanded upon in The Crew).

The essay is a great and concise history of these comics, but it also serves as a lesson on visibility. That Marvel hasn’t reprinted these stories or released newer editions of the paperbacks brings up more questions than it should. I think Horne’s essay makes a strong argument as to why we need these comics back on the stands.

On the comic’s side of Marvel’s Voices, we get a strong if a bit uneven set of short stories that are personal, celebratory, and thoughtful as to why Marvel characters mean so much in the struggle for more diverse voices in the industry. Kyle Baker, for instance, produced a one-pager Ant-Man and Nick Fury story titled “Perspective,” about Fury’s problem with depth perception. It’s a quick hit but the art on display here is impressive enough to make anyone want to see Baker do more Marvel work.

Geoffrey Thorne, Khary Randolph, and Emilio López’s “Top of the Key,” on the other hand, is a one-pager on Mosaic story (a character Marvel has severely underused, in my opinion) that would’ve benefited from an additional page or two. It feels more like a setup for a larger story and we only really just get a taste of it.

Rob Markman, Damion Scott, and Dono Sánchez-Almara’s “What a Wonderful World” stands as one of the most impressive stories in the anthology as it offers a well-rounded look at a Marvel character with outstanding art and a clear message to boot. It centers on a troubled Silver Surfer, comparing Marvel’s biggest villains with humanity’s own villainy when it comes to protecting the environment. No panel was spared, no color was misplaced, and no bit of text hung without intent. Just a really good two-page story.

The best story in the book is without question “Inspiration,” by James Monroe Iglehart, Ray-Anthony Height, and Emilio López. This 4-page tale gives the radioactive spider that gave Peter Parker his powers a much-deserved platform to contemplate his role in the grand scheme of things. The script showcases an interesting play on what a superpowered spider is supposed to be and how much of its natural instincts define its actions. It’s simply unforgettable and truly worthy of getting its own comic book series.

Marvel Voices #1 is the type of book Marvel needs to invest more on. It shows just how important it is to bring in other perspectives into this superhero universe and just how different it can all turn out to be. It speaks to the power of voices hungry for diversity in storytelling. And that, in itself, is a beautiful thing.

Writers: John Jennings, Anthony Piper, Luciano Vecchio, David Betancourt, James Monroe Iglehart, Evan Narcisse, Vita Ayala, Regine L. Sawyer, Brian Stelfreeze, Brandon Montclare, Tatiana King Jones, Karama Horne, Kyle Baker, Roxane Gay, Yona Harvey, Don McGregor, Geoffrey Thorne, Rob Markman, Method Man, Daniel Dominguez, Charlamagne The God, David F. Walker, Chuck Brown
Art: Anthony Piper, Luciano Vecchio, Ray-Anthony Height, Jahnoy Lindsay, Bernard Chang, Brian Stelfreeze, Natacha Bustos, Kyle Baker, Brittney L. Williams, Khary Randolph, Damion Scott, Alitha E. Martinez, JJ Kirby, Sanford Greene
Color: Anthony Piper, Luciano Vecchio, Emilio Lopez, Marcelo Maiolo, Brian Stelfreeze, Tamra Bonvillain, Kyle Baker, Rachelle Rosenberg, Dono Sánchez-Almara, JJ Kirby, Matt Herms
Letterer: Travis Lanham
Writing: 9 Essays: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10
Recommendation: Buy and make sure to bag and board it.

Preview: Vault of Spiders #2

Vault of Spiders #2

(W) Cullen Bunn, Geoffrey Thorne, Jed MacKay, Ryan North (A) David Williams, Mark Bagley, Scott Koblish (CA) Giuseppe Camuncoli
Rated T
In Shops: Nov 14, 2018
SRP: $3.99

A SPIDER-GEDDON TIE-IN!
• We’re way past first blood-the Spider-Army needs new recruits! No one’s too weird to die for – er – serve the cause!
• Ryan North joins the cause with an incredible story starring SPIDER-MA’AM, a spider-powered Aunt May with Dave Williams (UNCANNY X-FORCE) on art!
• CULLEN BUNN (X-MEN BLUE) brings you a tale of a nightmare world where monsters roam the streets and a SPIDER-MAN strange enough to call it home! You will NEVER guess who’s under the mask!
• Geoffrey Thorne brings an all new Spider-Character to the table, with a Spider-Powered Captain Stacy! Police Officer by day, vigilante by night in a way you’ve never seen before!

Marvel Weekly Graphic Novel Review: Mosaic, Black Widow, Captain America: Marvel Knights

It’s Wednesday which means new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. We’ve got three new volumes from Marvel featuring Mosaic, Black Widow, and Captain America

Captain America: Marvel Knights Vol. 2 featuring issues Captain America (2002) #1-32 and Captain America: Red, White & Blue by Dave Gibbons, Robert Morales, Robert Kirkman, Lee Weeks, Chris Bachalo, Eddie Campbell, Scot Eaton, and more.

Mosaic Vol. 1 King of the World featuring issues #1-5 by Geoffrey Thorne, Khary Randolph, Emilio Lopez, and Andres Mossa.

Black Widow Vol. 2 No More Secrets featuring issues #7-12 by Chris Samnee, Mark Waid, and Matthew Wilson.

Find out about the trade and whether you should grab yourself a copy. You can find both in comic stores April 26 and bookstores May 9.

Get your copies now. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Captain America: Marvel Knights Vol. 2
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

Mosaic Vol. 1 King of the World
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

Black Widow Vol. 2 No More Secrets
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Preview: Mosaic #7

Mosaic #7

(W) Geoffrey Thorne (A) Bruno Oliveira (CA) Leila del Duca
Rated T
In Shops: Apr 12, 2017
SRP: $3.99

Mosaic delves deeper into his powers with the help of the Inhumans! But the Brand Corporation isn’t done with him yet!

Preview: Mosaic #6

Mosaic #6

(W) Geoffrey Thorne (A) Thony Silas (CA) Mike Del Mundo
Rated T+
In Shops: Mar 08, 2017
SRP: $3.99

Witness the first meeting between the Inhumans and Mosaic!

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