Tag Archives: gallery 13 comics

Search for Hu banner ad

Review: To Build a Fire: Based on Jack London’s Classic Story

Published by Gallery 13 Comics, To Build a Fire is based on Jack London’s classic story. Chaboute has put together a beautiful graphic novel focused on man versus nature.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

Gallery 13 Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: All the Answers

Joel Kupperman became one of the most famous children in America during World War II as one of the young geniuses on the series Quiz Kids. With the uncanny ability to perform complex math problems in his head, Joel endeared himself to audiences across the country and became a national obsession. Following a childhood spent in the public eye, only to then fall victim to the same public’s derision, Joel deliberately spent the remainder of his life removed from the world at large. With wit and heart, Michael Kupperman presents a fascinating account of mid-century radio and early television history, the pro-Jewish propaganda entertainment used to counteract anti-Semitism, and the early age of modern celebrity culture.

This graphic memoir is out in book stores now and comic stores May 16th. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

 

Gallery 13 Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Roughneck

When I was in grade school, it was the first time, history class caught my attention. I was not like most students, who gravitated towards classes like Math or gym, as I did enjoy those as well, but history was my first obsession. It was something instilled in me from an early age, as the stories I heard from both sides of my family, always triggered my need to find out more. I even remembered when I read a book about anything history related, I would eventually look up the books that are referenced in the book.

The one part of history, that got me to hate an American President, was the trail of tears.  From what I read, I could not believe an American president would subdue America’s own indigenous peoples to such a grave injustice. As I eventually found out through my research, is that he was not the only one, and America is not the only country to treat their native peoples like second class citizens. The long-term effects of this history, can be seen on their descendants, which is the story Jeff Lemire lays out in Roughneck.

In the town of Pimitamon, a county in the wilderness of Canada, mostly populated by Canada’s indigenous tribes, we meet Derek Ouelette, a former professional hockey player, who is an alcoholic with an anger problem and who feels his best days are behind, as he works as a janitor, for the local ice rink. His sister, Bethy, comes back to town, running away from an abusive boyfriend, who is a drug addict, and whose life doesn’t seem to have shaped the way she thought it was going to. As this brother and sister, deal with their own personal demons, and trying to support each other in some semblance of what they feel a family is, they eventually hide out in a cabin, as her boyfriend is getting closer to where she is. By book’s end, a fight between Derek and Bethy’s boyfriend happens, but Derek is saved by the local police before things get dire.

Overall, a tear-jerking and enthralling book that will have the reader rooting for Derek and Bethy to love each other and love themselves. The story by Lemire is powerful and heartfelt. The art by Lemire is beautiful. Altogether, a book that although the world is unfair, love still finds a way.

Story: Jeff Lemire Art: Jeff Lemire
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation : Buy

Review: Park Bench

Serialized television, feels like a spin cycle, as it rarely challenges status quo. Take any episode of Law and Order and just about any episode you watch, had already been done on the show, but in a different way. Very few challenge the viewer’s perceptions, or make them face their demons. It is even rarer where they see someone they know on television.

That is why when I first heard and finally saw Room 104, I was quite blown away, how they show these different people in the same rooms react to their own situations within this confined space. Each episode peered into each person’s life while showing some very recognizable people in different shapes, ages, and races. It really made me wonder why more auteurs don’t do work that challenges the viewer, make them uncomfortable and make them think. The show was popped in my mind when I read Christophe Chabouté’s Park Bench, a wordless study in human behavior with an inanimate behavior.

Chabouté introduces the reader to   this one park bench situated in the middle of this particular  park, as people from all walks of lives, steal a moment for themselves. As each occupant of the bench, either by themselves or with someone else, leave a little of themselves on this bench. Some sit on this bench once, as one man gets stood up by what seems to be a date, while others sit on the bench multiple times like the elderly couple. By book’s end, each occupant, is at their most vulnerable.

Overall, a beautifully introspective book which will make you question life’s many questions and your role as citizen of the world. The stories by Chabouté are tragic, melodramatic, funny and meditative. The art by by Chabouté is gorgeous. Altogether, an excellent book which proves Chabouté is a master storytelling.

Story: Christophe Chabouté Art: Christophe Chabouté
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Wednesday Graphic Novel Review: Creepshow

The graphic novel adaptation of the classic horror anthology film written by Stephen King, with art by Bernie Wrightson!

Now back in print: the graphic novel adaptation of Stephen King’s Creepshow, based on the 1982 horror anthology and cult classic film directed by George Romero (Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead)—and featuring stunning illustrations by the legendary Bernie Wrightson and cover art by the acclaimed Jack Kamen! A harrowing and darkly humorous tribute to the controversial and influential horror comics of the 1950s, Creepshow presents five sinister stories.

This is a graphic novel that’s a must get and we tell you why!

Get your copy now through Amazon.

 

 

Gallery 13 Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Almost American