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Review: Lone Wolves

The Lone Wolves saga from Black Library and Games Workshop is collected in color for the first time.

Story: Dan Abnett
Art: Karl Richardson
Color: Derek Dow

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon

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Darkhawk Returns in April to Reclaim His Destiny

One of Marvel’s most popular 90s creations, Darkhawk will return in April in a special giant-sized celebration issue. Honoring the iconic hero’s 30th anniversary, Darkhawk: Heart of the Hawk will feature three spectacular tales from all-star creative teams including Darkhawk’s creators: writer Danny Fingeroth and artist Mike Manley. This action-packed issue will celebrate Darkhawk’s legacy, explore his defining eras, and set up the hero up for his bright Marvel Comics future.

When teenager Chris Powell discovered a mysterious amulet, he was transformed into the armored spacefaring hero known as Darkhawk. Now, Danny Fingeroth and Mike Manley reunite to revisit the beginning of Darkhawk’s saga.

Next up, writer Dan Abnett, known for penning Darkhawk’s years as a cosmic adventurer during his “War of Kings” epic, returns to Marvel Comics with a thrilling story, featuring art by Andrea Di Vito.

Finally, Kyle Higgins sets the stage for Darkhawk’s future adventures.

From street-level vigilante to cosmic defender, Darkhawk has proven to be one of Marvel’s most unpredictable and resilient heroes. See what’s next to come for this beloved character when Darkhawk: Heart of the Hawk #1 hits stands in April. It features a cover by Inhyuk Lee.

Darkhawk: Heart of the Hawk #1

Review: Rai #10

Rai #10

I feel like those who are not reading Rai have truly missed out on an absolutely fantastic story. Set in the 41st century, Rai and his brother Raijin have wandered the world looking for the lost remnants of their adversary, Father, looking to destroy them. Along the way, they’ve had some rather creative run-ins with Father’s offspring. The latest tale involves Fusion, another of Father’s machinations, who controls New Ur, a positronic city. In the last issue, they showed their true colors and came for Rai and his companions.

Rai #10 continues the action as Rai and Fusion do their thing. Raijin and Alice, Rai’s companions, are attacked and Alice falls…only to don the look of Bloodshot. Rai’s victory is short-lived as he leaves to the wilderness to be confronted by the dark he’d heard so much of, but it’s not the dark but the Darque, a nod to one of Valiant’s best villains that we’ve not seen in quite a few years.

Dan Abnett had been tasked with bringing back Rai and those adventures started in the event Fallen World. Since issue one, it’s been one of the best books they’ve published. The world around Rai has been greatly fleshed out and a lot of the threats have been really interesting. In a previous run, it’s revealed that positronic individuals are discriminated against and murdered for fun so having New Ur turn that around as a society against humans was a fun twist. There are a few story threads with Rai and they are given the proper amount of pages to not be neglected. Alice, who I was sure was going to be a throwaway character, ends up something far more interesting here, possibly becoming Bloodshot.

Juan Jose Ryp is one of my favorite artists in comics. He’s been on this entire run of Rai and delivered a lot of spectacular pages. There’s so much detail in his work and with this series, he’s done a lot of creative action sequences. Rai #10 is no different and with having Andrew Dalhouse on colors, they make each page a must-see.

This issue ends this volume of Rai and with some cliffhangers, too. My hopes are that it’s not for long and that we can get this team back on these characters. The pandemic has had such an awful effect on everything and been brutal on the work of smaller publishers. Still, this issue continues my thoughts that Rai is one of the best books of 2020 and that everyone asking for good comics should be rushing to get this one.

Story: Dan Abnett Artist: Juan José Ryp
Colorist: Andrew Dalhouse Letter: Dave Sharpe

Story: 9.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology – Kindle – Zeus Comics

Review: RAI #10

RAI #10

It’s the final standoff against Fusion and the denizens of New Ur with our post-apocalyptic cyborg samurai in RAI #10. A mysterious power rises from the era before New Japan, but is the reemergence of this force for good, or something a shade darker?

Please note that there may be minor spoilers for RAI #10 below. If you want to avoid them completely, skip right to the end where you’ll find a glowing recommendation.

There is no doubt whatsoever that RAI is Valiant’s best title right now, and in my mind one of the top three titles on the racks (it’s certainly the most consistent in quality). Which brings me to a strange conundrum; the consistency and quality of the book is such that beyond talking about the plot itself, there’s little that I haven’t already written about the comic left to say.

It’s honestly a lovely situation to be in.

The following two paragraphs are taken from my review of the previous issue, not because I’m lazy, but because rather than rewrite the same thing in a different way, I’m being economical with our time. If you read the review of the last issue then you can skip them – if not, then you should really check it out.

There’s no question in my mind anymore that Rai is one of the absolute best series from any publisher currently being published. It is unquestionably Valiant’s best. The first volume of the series has been collected in trade, and you can find my reviews of the first, second, third, and fourth issues at those links. Initially, the series took me by surprise – given how much I loved the precursor, Fallen World, I wasn’t expecting to enjoy Rai as much as I have. Every issue has been near perfection. The theme of the series has the inclusion of technology in our lives and the potential future we face with an over-reliance on the devices in our hands, pockets, and on our wrists. One could argue I’m reading too much into the comics, but I’d like to counter that. After all, what a reader takes from a book can be different depending on their perspective, and I know there’s too much technology in my life already.

The core concept of the series has been remarkably simple in that Rai and his younger brother figure who is also an older model android, Raijin (it’s not actually as confusing as it sounds, but to fully understand it you may want to circle back through the first volume of Rai written by Matt Kindt), are searching for Offspirng. Pieces of artificially intelligent code that when returned to Bloodfather will make him nigh unstoppable. Each issue centers around Rai and Raijin and their search for more Offspring, giving the series it’s overarching plot line while allowing Dan Abnett to have each issue effectively tell either a whole story or the first (or second) half of one. It’s in these single issues that Abnett explores the various subtexts that lend themselves so well to science fiction.

Back with me?

Okay. After RAI #9 left our heroes confronting a positronic citizen who had absorbed two of Father’s Seeds, the issue was slower with more dialogue and exposition in the comic than outright action – that is far from the case here. Ryp has choreographed one of the most fantastic fight scenes I’ve seen in a long time – the dance as Rai faces off again Fusion across multiple panels and pages is worth picking up the comic for alone. It’s a fantastic piece of artwork that, and Abnett lets the art do the talking as there’s very little words on the page as the two warriors face off in a a deadly duel.

His detailed yet gentle style has always been among my favourite art styles for action books, and the lack of heavy inking only serves to emphasize the beauty of the art. Coloured by Andrew Dalhouse, the visual presentation of the book is near flawless – which should not shock readers at this point. The comic is a masterpiece from start to finish.

We also get to see the results of Spylocke’s digital war against Bloodfather, or the Red King, as he finally has a lock on her location – the culmination of that subplot had me grinning from ear to ear as the comic came to a close, though I was left with the deeply unsatisfying feeling of having to wait an unknown amount of time for the story to continue.

With RAI #10, Abnett, Ryp, Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe have, yet again, delivered a phenomenal comic; if you’ve not been reading the book so far, then this is an excellent time to pick up the trades and find out what you’ve been missing. RAI #10, the conclusion to the first volume of the story is every bit as good as the previous nine issues, with only one slight flaw: the next volume doesn’t start next month.

This series has become one of my absolute favourites, and I can’t wait to see what comes next. I just hope I don’t need to wait too long.

Story: Dan Abnett Artist: Juan José Ryp
Colorist: Andrew Dalhouse Letter: Dave Sharpe

Story: 9.5 Art: 9.8 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Preview: RAI #10

RAI #10

Written by DAN ABNETT
Art by JUAN JOSÈ RYP, BEN LOBEL
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by NETHO DIAZ
Cover B by ROBERT DE LA TORRE
Preorder Variant Cover by JOSÈ LADRÖNN
On Sale December 16th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

The “Wild Frontiers” explode in Dan and Juan’s thrilling climax to the sci-fi epic of 2020!

It’s the final standoff against Fusion and the denizens of New Ur with our post-apocalyptic cyborg samurai.

A mysterious power rises from the era before New Japan, but is the reemergence of this force for good, or something a shade darker?

RAI #10

Review: RAI #9

RAI #9

The critically-acclaimed post-apocalyptic epic races onward in RAI #9! As Rai faces his strongest foe yet, the curtain is pulled back on this sci-fi world, revealing the dark secrets that lurk underneath. Rai and Raijin believe they’ve found sanctuary in the city of New Ur. Meanwhile, Spylocke determines there may be one last hope to defeat Bloodfather: Ray Garrison. Can she reach the former one-many army or has he succumbed to their arch nemesis?

There is no doubt whatsoever that RAI is Valiant’s best title right now, and in my mind one of the top three titles on the racks (it’s certainly the most consistent in quality). Which brings me to a strange conundrum; the consistency and quality of the book is such that beyond talking about the plot itself, there’s little that I haven’t already written about the comic left to say.

It’s honestly a lovely situation to be in.

The following two paragraphs are taken from my review of the previous issue, not because I’m lazy, but because rather than rewrite the same thing in a different way, I’m being economical with our time. If you read the review of the last issue then you can skip them – if not, then you should really check it out.

There’s no question in my mind anymore that Rai is one of the absolute best series from any publisher currently being published. It is unquestionably Valiant’s best. The first volume of the series has been collected in trade, and you can find my reviews of the first, second, third, and fourth issues at those links. Initially, the series took me by surprise – given how much I loved the precursor, Fallen World, I wasn’t expecting to enjoy Rai as much as I have. Every issue has been near perfection. The theme of the series has the inclusion of technology in our lives and the potential future we face with an over-reliance on the devices in our hands, pockets, and on our wrists. One could argue I’m reading too much into the comics, but I’d like to counter that. After all, what a reader takes from a book can be different depending on their perspective, and I know there’s too much technology in my life already.

The core concept of the series has been remarkably simple in that Rai and his younger brother figure who is also an older model android, Raijin (it’s not actually as confusing as it sounds, but to fully understand it you may want to circle back through the first volume of Rai written by Matt Kindt), are searching for Offspirng. Pieces of artificially intelligent code that when returned to Bloodfather will make him nigh unstoppable. Each issue centers around Rai and Raijin and their search for more Offspring, giving the series it’s overarching plot line while allowing Dan Abnett to have each issue effectively tell either a whole story or the first (or second) half of one. It’s in these single issues that Abnett explores the various subtexts that lend themselves so well to science fiction.

Back with me?

Okay. After RAI #8 left our heroes confronting a positronic citizen who had absorbed two of Father’s Seeds, RAI #9 picks up as Rai, Raijin and their human companion Alice enter New Ur to learn more about this potential new ally in the war for the planet’s freedom. It’s a slightly slower issue than we’ve seen before, but no less engaging as Raijin tries to puzzle out what his brother is thinking whilst navigating the city’s prejudice to any non-positronic being. Specifically, Alice, who Raijin is determined to protect. There are some great moments in the book, brought to life by Juan José Ryp in is insanely detailed art style; it constantly amazes me how much he packs into each panel and yet it never distracts from what he wants your eye to be drawn to – it’s a unique balance that Ryp strikes, and it elevates every comic he works on.

His detailed yet gentle style has always been among my favourite art styles for action books, and the lack of heavy inking only serves to emphasize the beauty of the art. Man, Ryp’s art is every bit as good as the story, and elevates the comic to an entirely new level. Coloured by Andrew Dalhouse, the visual presentation of the book is near flawless. I’ve been a huge fan of both Ryp and Dalhouse ever since I first saw their work in a Valiant book, and I have never been disappointed by either man’s work; this book, much like every other in the series, is no exception.

There’s a less immediate threat present in RAI #9, but it’s still present just below the surface, giving the comic a sense of building tension that we’ll see playout in the not too distant future (possibly, for example, Rai #10) as Raijin, Alice and Rai find themselves caught in a situation that they may need to fight their way out of.

The subplot of the comic finds Spylocke trying to rescue what’s left of Bloodshot’s mind from deep within Father’s AI in the hopes that the former soldier can assist them in the war to come. It’s a very digitized segment, and much like any images depicting future hacking (or even a visual interpretation of hacking that’s more than a person at a keyboard), you’ll see some strangely sweeping images that wouldn’t look out of place in a comic about LSD and acid. It’s a unusual combination, but one that’s entirely welcome for the juxtaposition in the images it creates in the comic.

With RAI #9, Abnett, Ryp, Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe have, yet again, delivered a phenomenal comic; if you’ve not been reading the book so far, then this is an excellent time to pick up the trades and find out what you’ve been missing.

Hint: it’s great.

Story: Dan Abnett Artist: Juan José Ryp
Colorist: Andrew Dalhouse Letter: Dave Sharpe

Story: 9.4 Art: 9.8 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Preview: RAI #9

RAI #9

Written by DAN ABNETT
Art by JUAN JOSÈ RYP
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE 
Cover A by FRITZ CASAS
Cover B by FERNANDO DAGNINO
Preorder Variant Cover by DAVID NAKAYAMA
On sale NOVEMBER 11th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

The critically-acclaimed post-apocalyptic epic races onward!

As Rai faces his strongest foe yet, the curtain is pulled back on this sci-fi world, revealing the dark secrets that lurk underneath.

RAI #9

Review: Rai #8

Rai #8

Sci-fi masterminds Dan Abnett and Juan José Ryp pull you further into their futuristic landscape in Rai #8! Rai and Raijin’s quest leads them to a Positronic utopia! Except peace is never as peaceful as it looks. Will the pair preserve or perish?

In some ways, reviewing this series is both a blessing and a bit of a headache. The creative team are so damn consistent, that I’m almost running out of new things to say about a series. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, because the consistency of Rai is an incredible strength to the series and I look forward to reading it more than any other book each month – it was the book I was most excited for when comics began shipping again.

The following two paragraphs are taken from my review of the previous issue, not because I’m lazy, but because rather than rewrite the same thing in a different way, I’m being economical with our time. If you read the review of the last issue then you can skip them – if not, then you should really check it out.

There’s no question in my mind anymore that Rai is one of the absolute best series from any publisher currently being published. It is unquestionably Valiant’s best. The first volume of the series has been collected in trade, and you can find my reviews of the first, second, third, and fourth issues at those links. Initially, the series took me by surprise – given how much I loved the precursor, Fallen World, I wasn’t expecting to enjoy Rai as much as I have. Every issue has been near perfection. The theme of the series has the inclusion of technology in our lives and the potential future we face with an over-reliance on the devices in our hands, pockets, and on our wrists. One could argue I’m reading too much into the comics, but I’d like to counter that. After all, what a reader takes from a book can be different depending on their perspective, and I know there’s too much technology in my life already.

The core concept of the series has been remarkably simple in that Rai and his younger brother figure who is also an older model android, Raijin (it’s not actually as confusing as it sounds, but to fully understand it you may want to circle back through the first volume of Rai written by Matt Kindt), are searching for Offspirng. Pieces of artificially intelligent code that when returned to Bloodfather will make him nigh unstoppable. Each issue centers around Rai and Raijin and their search for more Offspring, giving the series it’s overarching plot line while allowing Dan Abnett to have each issue effectively tell either a whole story or the first (or second) half of one. It’s in these single issues that Abnett explores the various subtexts that lend themselves so well to science fiction.

Back with me?

Perfect. Rai #8 ratchets up the tension as Rai, Raijin and their human companion Alice encounter a city of positronics in their search for Offspring, pieces of AI code they must destroy to prevent the evil Father from being able to exert his influence over the lands. We’re also given a look at how some outsiders are welcome in any society, but others are shunned and ignore – often for things far out of their own control. It’s not uncomfortable, nor is it overly obvious, but it’s the subtleties of Juan Jose Ryp’s artwork that really sells the scene.

Speaking of the art, Jose Ryp’s artwork is once again brilliant. His detailed yet gentle style has always been among my favourite art styles for action books, and the lack of heavy inking only serves to emphasize the beauty of the art. Man, Ryp’s art is every bit as good as the story, and elevates the comic to an entirely new level. Coloured by Andrew Dalhouse, the visual presentation of the book is near flawless. I’ve been a huge fan of both Ryp and Dalhouse ever since I first saw their work in a Valiant book, and I have never been disappointed by either man’s work; this book, muxh like every other in the series, is no exception.

Is Rai #8 a perfect comic? No, but it’s damn close. I don’t know that I could find any fault in the story, art, or presentation if I tried – and I tried (I try to make sure I’m not being too blinded by a comic, after all). Again, this is the one book I am most excited for each month, and each month I’ve never been let down. Truly one of the very best books on the racks.

Story: Dan Abnett Artist: Juan Jose Ryp
Colorist: Andrew Dalhouse Letter: Dave Sharpe

Story: 9.8 Art: 9.8 Overall: 9.8 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Preview: RAI #8

RAI #8

Written by DAN ABNETT
Art by JUAN JOSÈ RYP
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE 
Cover A by WALT SIMONSON
Cover B by BRET BLEVINS
Preorder Variant Cover by KANO
On sale OCTOBER 21st | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Sci-fi masterminds Dan Abnett and Juan José Ryp pull you further into their futuristic landscape!

Rai and Raijin’s quest leads them to a Positronic utopia! Except peace is never as peaceful as it looks. Will the pair preserve or perish?

RAI #8

Preview: Justice League Odyssey #25

Justice League Odyssey #25

Written by: Dan Abnett
Art by: Will Conrad

Final issue! The Justice League’s intergalactic team of Green Lantern Jessica Cruz, Orion of the New Gods, Red Lantern Dex-Starr, and New Teen Titans Starfire and Cyborg make a final stand against Darkseid in a battle that reshapes the cosmic landscape across every sector of space!

Justice League Odyssey #25
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