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Preview: American Vampire 1976 #7

American Vampire 1976 #7

Written by: Scott Snyder
Art by: Ricardo López Ortiz, Tula Lotay, Francesco Francavilla

Before Skinner and Pearl reunited and the Beast returned-before 1976-the fight to protect humanity persisted. This special anthology issue presents new stories from the unseen era between American Vampire: Second Cycle and American Vampire 1976, bridging the VMS’ turbulent past with a nation’s uncertain future. Jim Book and Pearl will test their new partnership on a mission to uncover new DNA technology in the fight against the Beast, Travis, and Gus enjoy a rare carefree moment in exile, and a deathbed vision reveals the truth about George Washington’s pact with the Council of Firsts and America’s role as a haven for persecuted monsters.

American Vampire 1976 #7

Preview: American Vampire 1976 #6

American Vampire 1976 #6

Written by: Scott Snyder
Art by: Rafael Albuquerque

With the help of the Council of Firsts, Skinner’s team has learned the secret sacrifice required to obtain the Blood of Light-their only hope of stopping the Beast from destroying humanity and conquering the world. Finally within reach of the remedy, the crew sends one of its own on the grueling last leg of the mission-but a devastating betrayal and an unwelcome revelation about Skinner’s quest for immortality could sabotage the expedition.

American Vampire 1976 #6

Preview: American Vampire 1976 #5

American Vampire 1976 #5

Written by: Scott Snyder
Art by: Rafael Albuquerque

Skinner, Pearl, Book, and the rest of the team are finally united in their mission to stop the Beast from world domination, but the missing key to their success is protected by a council of preeminent ancestral monsters with an axe to grind. These are the progenitors of some of the world’s most iconic folkloric species, and the victims of a broken American promise. Desperate for the council’s assistance, Skinner’s crew becomes a captive audience to their tale of betrayal-but the chilling insight saps all hope of recruiting their help. With only a few days to spare before terror is unleashed, the team must convince the legends that humanity is worth preserving, and that history may still bend toward redemption.

American Vampire 1976 #5

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

The Black Panther Party: A Graphic Novel History

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

American Vampire 1976 #4 (DC Comics/DC Black Label) – The series has been a lot of fun so far. Though it leans a bit towards those who have previously read the series, new readers should be able to enjoy it for the great action.

Ascencia #1 (Wake Entertainment) – The drummer of System of a Down brings his talents to comics in a story about what one would do to become immortal.

The Black Panther Party: A Graphic Novel History (Ten Speed Press) – The retelling of the group and its key figures

DC Future State (DC Comics) – DC Future State has been a pretty solid event so far. There’s only been a few clunkers but overall, it’s been a pretty solid “gimmick”. This week’s releases include Future State: Dark Detective #1, Future State: Green Lantern #1, Future State: Justice League #1, Future State: Kara Zor-El, Superwoman #1, Future State: Robin Eternal #1, Future State: Superman/Wonder Woman #1, Future State: Teen Titans #1.

HaHa #1 (Image Comics) – The new miniseries features a rotating group of artists joining W. Maxwell Prince to explore the world of clowns.

Home Sick Pilots #2 (Image Comics) – The debut issue was a creepy start of a haunted house story. We’re still not 100% sure of what’s going on but we really want to find out.

League of Super Feminists (Drawn & Quarterly) – A graphic novel guide to some of the central tenets of feminism.

Manns World #1 (AWA Studios) – A tale of survival when four individuals on a resort anger the planet’s working class. Could be very interesting.

Serial #1 (Abstract Studios) – A young girl has been stuck being 10 for 50 years due to the demon inside. Now the demon is free and killing and Zoe must stop it.

Soulstream #1 (Scout Comics) – Marie and Markus discover an alternate dimension known as the Mirror World where their entire city has been destroyed and replaced by a volcanic wasteland.

Space Bastards #1 (Humanoids) – An unemployed accountant joins the Intergalactic Postal Service. Delivery is mercenary where payment goes to whoever delivers the package.

Preview: American Vampire 1976 #4

American Vampire 1976 #4

Written by: Scott Snyder
Art by: Rafael Albuquerque

Key clues and coordinates in hand, the rogue branches of the VMS reunite for a final mission that could unlock the secret to taking down The Beast. On their journey to find answers about a pact between America’s Founding Fathers and an ancient counsel of monsters, the whole team-Skinner, Pearl, Book, Felicia, Travis, and Cal-realize they’ll need to confront their own complicated personal pasts before they have a hope of correcting world history. Back at the White House, the Gray Trader’s secret associate, Bixby, wrestles with his allegiance to evil and makes a final decision about the president’s fate.

American Vampire 1976 #4

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Lords of Misery

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

American Vampire 1976 #3 (DC Comics/DC Black Label) – A great return to this series so far that brings the action with each issue.

Batman: Black & White #1 (DC Comics) – A new anthology series from some top talent all giving their spin on the world of Batman.

Byte-Sized #1 (AWA Studios) – Horror comes to the holidays in this new series from writer Cullen Bunn!

Comic Book History of Animation #1 (IDW Publishing) – A new series focusing on the filmmakers and beloved characters of the past century and a half.

Crossover #2 (Image Comics) – The first issue was a lot of fun as the world of comics bled over into the real world causing all sorts of comics. The first issue felt like a love letter to comics and we’re excited to see where it all goes.

Heroes at Home #1 (Marvel) – We’ve been locked up due to COVID for much of the year so how are Marvel’s heroes dealing with it?

Home Sick Pilots #1 (Image Comics) – A brand new horror series that we’re excited to check out.

Legacy of Mandrake the Magician #3 (Red 5 Comics) – A great update to the classic character that has us excited for every issue. A solid series so far.

Mighty Morphin #2 (BOOM! Studios) – The first issue was such a solid re-introduction to the property with a direction that’s great for new and old readers. What’s next? We want to see!

King in Black: Namor #1 and Venom #31 (Marvel) – The opening issue of King in Black was solid and exceeded our expectations. These are the next two tie-ins and we really want to see where this goes from here and if the quality continues.

Locke & Key/Sandman: Hell & Gone #0 (IDW Publishing) – If you think you can unlock the gates of Hell and just invite yourself in, you must be Dreaming! The Sandman Universe crossover begins here. We’re… intrigued.

Lords of Misery (Albatross Funnybooks) – This standalone story reveals the adventure the Goon, along with several other mysterious figures, found himself entangled in after he departed the Nameless Town.

Scarenthood #2 (IDW Publishing) – The first issue took us by surprise and got us to laugh and gave some good scares too. A definite under-the-radar series that fans of horror should check out.

SWORD #1 (Marvel) – The Mutant nation of Krakoa has dominated Earth and now they’re taking their mission to space with the newly reformed SWORD.

Warhammer 40K: Marneus Calgar #3 (Marvel) – The last issue caught us off guard so we’re excited to see what else this series will throw at fans of Warhammer 40K.

Preview: American Vampire 1976 #3

American Vampire 1976 #3

Written by: Scott Snyder
Art by: Rafael Albuquerque

Two subterranean showdowns escalate! Thousands of miles apart, rogue American vampires and the last remnants of the VMS chase the only known leads against the Beast’s looming plans for world domination. As Skinner’s crew fight for their lives aboard the runaway Freedom Train in the Tongue-infested tunnels of the Southwest, Cal and Travis scavenge the tracks below Times Square for traces of the Beast’s terrifying challenger-but when they get too close to the monster for comfort, they’re blindsided by the mother of all unexpected twists.

American Vampire 1976 #3

Review: American Vampire 1976 #2

American Vampire 1976 #2

If you read the first issue of American Vampire 1976 and came out of it a little lost and confused, American Vampire 1976 #2 is what you’re looking for. The first issue played off of previous knowledge of the series in its set-up. This second issue explains what you need to know to enjoy the series. The stakes, the characters, it’s all laid out here for new readers and a reminder for long-time fans.

For those who don’t know, this latest volume takes place in 1976. Evil vampires are looking to wake up an ancient evil. To stop them, Skinner Sweet is recruited to steal a train which holds clues to stop it all.

Writer Scott Snyder does a fantastic job with this issue. American Vampire 1976 #2 acts as an easy way to catch up on everything you might not know and missed. It also really moves the story along in a quick pace. We’re much further in the story than I expected at this point. Things have flown with a fun aspect about it all.

In between Snyder cementing who these characters are, we also get some solid action, great humor, and horror. American Vampire 1976 #2 feels almost like the real start of the series to the previous issue’s tease and setup. It’s been years since I’ve read a comic from the series and it was beyond helpful to get this issue. It’s the perfect reminder as to what I didn’t remember. For new readers, it’ll be vital as the first issue. It packs a lot in but left out the “why” new readers should care.

Rafael Albuquerque’s art continues to be fantastic. Joined by Dave McCaig on color, the visuals of the comic bounce between horror and action. There are some fantastic sequences that drive things along and it’s all delivered with 70s cool. Albuquerque’s Gerald Ford is a little lacking but that’s a minor issue for a comic that otherwise looks great. What truly stands out is the team’s ability to balance its various genres. The comic is part heist and part horror and the two are balanced visually. If the horror aspects went a bit “scarier” or “gory” they would feel off or even more extreme to the issue’s focus on a heist.

The big sequence is a train robbery that relies more on the action and grand visuals and sequences made for the big screen. That sequence too eventually goes into horror territory with the need to that sequence to balance out with others in the comic. If other parts of the comic were a bit scarier or gorier, it’d lessen the pop for what happens later in the comic. It’s a solid balance done where one genre aspect never overpowers the other and the two deliver an entertaining balance.

American Vampire 1976 #2 is a fantastic second issue. It takes a step back to make sure all readers are caught up and on the same page while hurtling the story forward balancing its various aspects. While it’s the second issue, it feels like the true start to things and is as good a starting point as the first issue. If you were a bit confused by the debut or feel like you were missing something give this second issue a shot and get caught right up.

Story: Scott Snyder Art: Rafael Albuquerque Color: Dave McCaig
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus Comics

Preview: American Vampire 1976 #2

American Vampire 1976 #2

Written by: Scott Snyder
Art by: Rafael Albuquerque

Skinner, Pearl and a surprising new ally team up to pull off their game-changing heist of the Freedom Train, but time is running out for a nation in crisis. The Beast’s plan for mass terror and world domination is finally revealed in sick detail, and as humanity spirals toward extinction, there’s a devastating twist. When an unexpected force returns to pick off the VMS’s top officials, Travis and Cal discover that the ultimate evil has competition-and the final battle will be more merciless than anyone imagined.

American Vampire 1976 #2

Review: American Vampire 1976 #1

American Vampire 1976 #1

It feels like forever since I read an issue of American Vampire. While I remember the series starting off slow, it quickly became one of my favorite reads. The series showed off the talent of writer Scott Snyder and the artistic talent of Rafael Albuquerque and Dave McCaig. It’s been years… and honestly, I don’t remember a lot of it. That’s both good and bad for American Vampire 1976 #1. The good is, you generally don’t need to know what happened. The bad is, you’ll want to find out.

Snyder returns to his take on the world of vampires as the series flashes forward to 1976. It’s the bi-centennial for the United States. Though it’s 44 years ago, there are some things that are the same as today. It’s 1976, the President is a criminal, the economy is in the shitter, China is gaining, and “Russia is handing us our balls.” Add in people joining cults, kids going missing and people “kissing the devil’s ring instead of the lord’s feet,” and you could be talking about today.

It’s interesting that Snyder chose 1976 for the series to take place. While the above about how similar of a time it is today does stand out, the reality is, it’s kind of the hook as to where the comic is initially going. The comic to start is the setup of a heist.

American Vampire 1976 #1 lays out the series in a way one might expect for an Ocean’s 11 film. The key players are introduced and their personalities laid out on the table. The problem is discussed and the solution is a heist as to the answer. Much of the comic is standard in that way but it’s done with such and style and attitude, it’s a hell of a lot of fun.

But, what Snyder does that’s impressive is create a first issue that’s solid for new and old readers alike. If you remember everything that has happened, you’ll love jumping back in the world. For those that are new, there’s more than enough teased in explanations to understand what’s going on. You might not know specific characters and their connections but you get a sense what they think of each other and how they interact.

The cool of the comic is brought together through the art of Rafael Albuquerque and the colors of Dave McCaig. The comic art brings the 70s to life in its settings, clothes, and details. I can’t say how accurate the looks are, but it put me in the setting, and in the end, that’s what matters for me as a reader. The characters look like they haven’t aged a day since last I read the series, nor should they but to see their new style based on the era brings some fun with it.

What I really like about American Vampire 1976 #1 and the series as a whole is how it delivers action and the vampire aspect without going over the top. The issue has some gory fight scenes but never takes you out of the story. A head might be on the floor but it feels natural and maybe even downplays the gore a bit.

American Vampire 1976 #1 is a bit of the typical gathering of the key players story but it does it all in such an entertaining way both story-wise and look. It’s a fun reintroduction to the world of Skinner Sweet, the American Vampire, and has me wanting to go back and read what has come before. It impressively pulls off a debut that’s accessible for new readers and should excite longtime fans. Despite being years since the last chapter, American Vampire doesn’t miss a beat with its return.

Story: Scott Snyder Art: Rafael Albuquerque Color: Dave McCaig
Story: 8.25 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus Comics

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