Tag Archives: alex cormack

Preview: Road of Bones #4

Road of Bones #4

Rich Douek (w) • Alex Cormack (a & c)

Roman and Sergei passed the point of no return a long time ago. All that remains is the question of whether they will finally taste freedomor die in the frozen wasteland. Yet even as they work together to survive the brutal and unforgiving tundra, the machinations of the Domovik may wind up consuming them both. The epic tale of survival horror comes to a deadly conclusion in Road of Bones #4 from writer Rich Douek (Gutter Magic) and artist Alex Cormack (SINK).

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Road of Bones #4

Preview: Road of Bones #3

Road of Bones #3

Rich Douek (w) • Alex Cormack (a & c)

There is no god but hunger. And the loss of their food has driven Roman, Grigori, and Sergei to the absolute extreme. Knives are sharpened and souls are searched as each man decides just how far he is willing to go in order to survive the brutal tundra. One thing is certain, though—one must die for the others to live. Escape from the gulag takes a brutal and horrific turn in Road of Bones #3, from writer Rich Douek (Gutter Magic) and artist Alex Cormack (SINK).

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Road of Bones #3

Preview: Road of Bones #2

Road of Bones #2

Rich Douek (w) • Alex Cormack (a & c)

After weeks battling the cold, freezing tundra and a dwindling food supply, tension runs high between Roman, Sergei, and Grigori as they flee the horrors of the Kolyma Gulag. Their one hope is reaching a hunting lodge in the mountains where they can replenish their suppliesbut the rocky path grows more treacherous with every step. Even so, Roman has yet to discover the true meaning of treacheryuntil he learns what Grigori and Sergei’s true plan for survival is. The dark tale of survival at any cost in the Siberian wilderness continues in ROAD OF BONES #2 from writer Rich Douek (GUTTER MAGIC) and artist Alex Cormack (SINK).

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Road of Bones #2

Preview: Road of Bones #1

Road of Bones #1

Rich Douek (w) • Alex Cormack (a & c)

In 1953, the Siberian Gulag of Kolyma is hell on Earth—which is why Roman Morozov leaps at the chance to escape it. But even if they make it out, Roman and his fellow escapees still have hundreds of miles of frozen tundra between them and freedom. With the help of a mysterious being straight out of his childhood fairy tale stories, Roman just might make it—or is the being simply a manifestation of his brutal circumstances driving him insane?

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Road of Bones #1

Review: Road to Bones #1

Road to Bones #1

Road to Bones #1 is a comic that I might have overlooked if it weren’t for the description.

In 1953, the Siberian Gulag of Kolyma is hell on Earth. That’s why Roman Morozov leaps at the chance to escape it. Even if they make it out, Roman and his fellow escapees still have hundreds of miles of frozen tundra between them and freedom. With the help of a mysterious being out of his childhood fairy tales, Roman just might make it. Or is the being simply a manifestation of his brutal circumstances driving him insane?

Written by Rich Douek with art by Alex Cormack, and lettering by Justin Birch, Road to Bones #1 is all about the set up. And it’s a hell of a start. While the comic takes place in 1953 and Siberia, the story itself is a familiar one. Inmates attempt to escape a brutal prison. Outside, they must face a brutal environment and each other. In that sense, the comic isn’t original. But, the presentation is top notch.

The team have focused on the emotional ride of their story. The first issue creates a tension through until it gets to its horror infused final page. That’s the brilliance of the issue. While it feels like a prison break story, it’s the infusion of the supernatural and horror which makes it really stand out. Due to that focus, there’s an emotional ride that might not be present. The setting too does add something, giving the story a brutal edge that becomes ever more apparent as it moves along.

That’s helped by Cormack’s art which adds to the setting and harsh wintery conditions of the world. Cormack’s depiction of violence also leaves more than enough to the reader’s imagination adding to the psychological horror. That always leads to an exaggeration of horrors. Birch’s lettering is excellent as well adding to the atmosphere of it all. There’s something gritty about it, adding to the harsh nature.

At first, Road to Bones #1 might not seem original but by its end, it’s a debut that’ll have you begging to read the second issue immediately.

Story: Rich Douek Art: Alex Cormack Letterer: Justin Birch
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

IDW Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

IDW’s Amber Blake, Ghost Tree, and Road of Bones all Get New Printings

IDW Publishing announces today that several key issues of indie-friendly titles Amber BlakeGhost Tree, and Road of Bones have sold out at the distributor level! To meet the demand of fans and retailers, IDW will release second printings of Amber Blake #1, Ghost Tree#2, and Road of Bones #1, as well as the third printing of Ghost Tree #1, in June 2019.

Amber Blake, written by international modeling sensation Jade Lagardére and illustrated by industry legend Butch Guice, is a four-issue thriller that shines a harsh light on international human trafficking. The titular heroine, a top recruit at a covert agency, seeks to end human slavery in all of its forms…  and sets out on an intensely personal mission to avenge those she loves.

Amber Blake #1 Second Printing
Item Code: MAR198651
On-Sale Date: 6/12/19

Ghost Tree, a four-issue miniseries written by Bobby Curnow, illustrated by Simon Gane, and colored by Ian Herring, follows a young man whose return to his ancestral Japanese home leads him to a haunted tree… and the departed souls that are drawn to it. It’s a touching story of love and loss, exploring how the past never truly stays dead.

Ghost Tree #1 Third Printing Item Code: MAR198821 On-Sale Date: 6/26/19
Ghost Tree #2 Second Printing Item Code: MAR198822 On-Sale Date: 6/26/19

Note: Both of the new Ghost Tree printings are slated to release simultaneously on June 26th with the release of Ghost Tree #3.

Road of Bones, written by Rich Douek and illustrated by Alex Cormack, is a four-issue survival tale wherein horror, history, and Russian folklore collide. The worst prison in the world – the Siberian Gulag of Kolyma – is merely the gateway to even darker terrors, as escapees stumble over hundreds of miles of frozen tundra on a descent into delirious madness.

Road of Bones #1 Second Printing Item Code: MAR198823 On-Sale Date: 6/26/19

Review: Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons Director’s Cut #1

Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons Director’s Cut #1

The first time I was exposed to Dungeons & Dragons was when I was in middle school. One of my friends asked if I wanted to play. I didn’t quite understand the game or even its allure at the time. It seemed to me that it was just pretending to be someone you weren’t, which I found was what made it so compelling. The next time I’d see anyone play it was when I was in the Navy.

The game itself is steeped in lore and contained hundreds of characters which explained why some of the smartest people I knew played the game in the first place. The negotiation and social skills one would learn from the game is something one would never think you can get from roleplaying. Fast forward to today and RPGs are some of the best kind of games you can play in person, on game consoles, and even on your mobile device. This what made Patrick Rothfuss’ collaboration with Jim Zub for the crossover between D&D and Rick & Morty so appealing. We get a deluxe edition of the first issue in the series, Rick And Morty VS Dungeons & Dragons #1: Directors Cut.

We find Morty on the school bus, as he listens in on two kids who play D&D, who are deep into a game, one which intrigues Morty enough to want in. As he ends up going to hobby store to pick up a handbook and ends up flirting with a girl working there. As he starts reading, he soon realizes that he is out of his depth and asks Rick to teach him. As he shows him how he learned, which is far out of date for nay player, which forces Rick to step his game up. This leads to him creating a machine where both of them can build characters and play the actual game within a game.

Overall, an excellent tale that imbues the love of the game and of the people that play them, as this edition gives readers extra scenes and an excellent behind the scenes of the book. The story by Rothfuss and Zub is hilarious, action packed and well developed. The art by the creative team is pretty much gorgeous. Altogether, a joy ride for fans of the game and the TV show and this special edition is for fans of the creative team and the astounding work they did on this book.

Story: Patrick Rothfuss and Jim Zub
Art: Troy Little, Leonard Ito, Robbie Robbins and Alex Cormack
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

IDW Publishing and Oni Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Preview: Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons Director’s Cut #1

Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons Director’s Cut #1

Patrick Rothfuss & Jim Zub (w) • Troy Little (a) • Alex Cormack

Re-presenting the sold-out first issue in deluxe format! This special edition includes excerpts from Patrick Rothfuss and Jim Zub’s original script, work-in-progress process pages from the art table of Troy Little, and a section of rare and hard-to-find covers!

FC • 36 pages • $4.99

Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons Director’s Cut #1

Review: Train 8: The Zombie Express #2

“Nowhere To Run” was one of my favorite songs from Motown. I would hear the song in my parents’ house growing up ever so often and instantly get transported to another time and place. The voices of Martha and the Vandellas made that song soar and I can even hear it now. It brings back happy memories. It wasn’t until I saw the song play in a certain video that it gave me perspective.

It was used in NWA’s “100 Miles and Runnin,” and in that context was used to illustrate what the group was trying to convey. Since then, I wished that it was used more in horror movies. The irony of the lyrics combined with the situation would make for a perfect scene. In the second issue of Train 8: The Zombie Express, the unaffected passengers must find a way both survive and save humanity.

We catch up with the passengers as the train passes through the Idaho mountains and as Conductor Johnson looks for any life beyond the passenger cab he inhabits. As Tyler and the last of the unaffected passengers make their way through the train, they find the carnage left by those who are infected. We also find out that greater powers have their hands in what is going on and they try their best to contain the virus. By issue’s end, the remaining passengers find an empty cab and temporary refuge while one of them is trapped in a cabin full of primordials.

Overall, a nail biter of an issue which leaves you on the edge of your seat. The story by the creative team is action packed, well told, and smart. The art by the creative team complements the story well. Altogether, an exciting issue that sets up what looks to more than satisfy fans.

Story: Marysol Levant, Brian Phillipson, David Stephan
Art: Alex Cormack, Ashley Cormack
Story: 9.6 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Train 8: The Zombie Express #1

One of the best movies I have ever seen, because of its transcendence of concept and genre, was Snowpiercer. At first glance, the movie seemed to be one of those abstract films within the science fiction genre, that one would have to see a few times to understand the meaning. The most obvious and most used example is Inception which uses the well-researched science behind sleep and dreams to create an evocative celluloid classic. One my favorite movies, although many do not consider it a science fiction movie, is Adjustment Bureau which blends the genre with romance movies.

As affecting as these movies are, they are also very relevant in the message they deliver of the world today. This is the very reason science fiction is often considered protest fiction. In comics, we have seen over the last few years, this be even more prominent than any other medium. In Train 8: The Zombie Express, the reader gets embroiled in one such tale where an experiment goes wrong.

We are taken to the Genesis Research Unit in Seattle, Washington, where some scientists are trying to play with God where an experimental serum has caused violent outbreaks on its subjects. On the famous 8 train, which passengers from Seattle to Chicago, a few unknowing passengers, unexpectedly gets their day turned upside down, as one man got infected with the contagion created at Genesis. Rapidly, the virus starts affecting each passenger and turn them into primordial beings who feast on other humans. By issue’s end, the last remaining survivors suddenly realize that they are alone, and no help will be coming.

Overall, the issue is a pulse pounding debut issue that sets up what is soon to be a major motion picture and looks to be across between Resident Evil and The Mist. The story is explosive, fast paced, and highly entertaining. The art is gorgeous considering the subject matter. Altogether, it’s an excellent introduction to a world where playing with the course of evolution has dire consequences.

Story: Marysol Levant, Bryant Phillipson, and David Stephan
Art: Alex Cormack, Ashley Cormack

Story: 9.6 Art: 9.4 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

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