Tag Archives: alex cormack

IDW’s Amber Blake, Ghost Tree, and Road of Bones all Get New Printings

IDW Publishing announces today that several key issues of indie-friendly titles Amber BlakeGhost Tree, and Road of Bones have sold out at the distributor level! To meet the demand of fans and retailers, IDW will release second printings of Amber Blake #1, Ghost Tree#2, and Road of Bones #1, as well as the third printing of Ghost Tree #1, in June 2019.

Amber Blake, written by international modeling sensation Jade Lagardére and illustrated by industry legend Butch Guice, is a four-issue thriller that shines a harsh light on international human trafficking. The titular heroine, a top recruit at a covert agency, seeks to end human slavery in all of its forms…  and sets out on an intensely personal mission to avenge those she loves.

Amber Blake #1 Second Printing
Item Code: MAR198651
On-Sale Date: 6/12/19

Ghost Tree, a four-issue miniseries written by Bobby Curnow, illustrated by Simon Gane, and colored by Ian Herring, follows a young man whose return to his ancestral Japanese home leads him to a haunted tree… and the departed souls that are drawn to it. It’s a touching story of love and loss, exploring how the past never truly stays dead.

Ghost Tree #1 Third Printing Item Code: MAR198821 On-Sale Date: 6/26/19
Ghost Tree #2 Second Printing Item Code: MAR198822 On-Sale Date: 6/26/19

Note: Both of the new Ghost Tree printings are slated to release simultaneously on June 26th with the release of Ghost Tree #3.

Road of Bones, written by Rich Douek and illustrated by Alex Cormack, is a four-issue survival tale wherein horror, history, and Russian folklore collide. The worst prison in the world – the Siberian Gulag of Kolyma – is merely the gateway to even darker terrors, as escapees stumble over hundreds of miles of frozen tundra on a descent into delirious madness.

Road of Bones #1 Second Printing Item Code: MAR198823 On-Sale Date: 6/26/19

Review: Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons Director’s Cut #1

Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons Director’s Cut #1

The first time I was exposed to Dungeons & Dragons was when I was in middle school. One of my friends asked if I wanted to play. I didn’t quite understand the game or even its allure at the time. It seemed to me that it was just pretending to be someone you weren’t, which I found was what made it so compelling. The next time I’d see anyone play it was when I was in the Navy.

The game itself is steeped in lore and contained hundreds of characters which explained why some of the smartest people I knew played the game in the first place. The negotiation and social skills one would learn from the game is something one would never think you can get from roleplaying. Fast forward to today and RPGs are some of the best kind of games you can play in person, on game consoles, and even on your mobile device. This what made Patrick Rothfuss’ collaboration with Jim Zub for the crossover between D&D and Rick & Morty so appealing. We get a deluxe edition of the first issue in the series, Rick And Morty VS Dungeons & Dragons #1: Directors Cut.

We find Morty on the school bus, as he listens in on two kids who play D&D, who are deep into a game, one which intrigues Morty enough to want in. As he ends up going to hobby store to pick up a handbook and ends up flirting with a girl working there. As he starts reading, he soon realizes that he is out of his depth and asks Rick to teach him. As he shows him how he learned, which is far out of date for nay player, which forces Rick to step his game up. This leads to him creating a machine where both of them can build characters and play the actual game within a game.

Overall, an excellent tale that imbues the love of the game and of the people that play them, as this edition gives readers extra scenes and an excellent behind the scenes of the book. The story by Rothfuss and Zub is hilarious, action packed and well developed. The art by the creative team is pretty much gorgeous. Altogether, a joy ride for fans of the game and the TV show and this special edition is for fans of the creative team and the astounding work they did on this book.

Story: Patrick Rothfuss and Jim Zub
Art: Troy Little, Leonard Ito, Robbie Robbins and Alex Cormack
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

IDW Publishing and Oni Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Preview: Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons Director’s Cut #1

Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons Director’s Cut #1

Patrick Rothfuss & Jim Zub (w) • Troy Little (a) • Alex Cormack

Re-presenting the sold-out first issue in deluxe format! This special edition includes excerpts from Patrick Rothfuss and Jim Zub’s original script, work-in-progress process pages from the art table of Troy Little, and a section of rare and hard-to-find covers!

FC • 36 pages • $4.99

Rick and Morty vs. Dungeons & Dragons Director’s Cut #1

Review: Train 8: The Zombie Express #2

“Nowhere To Run” was one of my favorite songs from Motown. I would hear the song in my parents’ house growing up ever so often and instantly get transported to another time and place. The voices of Martha and the Vandellas made that song soar and I can even hear it now. It brings back happy memories. It wasn’t until I saw the song play in a certain video that it gave me perspective.

It was used in NWA’s “100 Miles and Runnin,” and in that context was used to illustrate what the group was trying to convey. Since then, I wished that it was used more in horror movies. The irony of the lyrics combined with the situation would make for a perfect scene. In the second issue of Train 8: The Zombie Express, the unaffected passengers must find a way both survive and save humanity.

We catch up with the passengers as the train passes through the Idaho mountains and as Conductor Johnson looks for any life beyond the passenger cab he inhabits. As Tyler and the last of the unaffected passengers make their way through the train, they find the carnage left by those who are infected. We also find out that greater powers have their hands in what is going on and they try their best to contain the virus. By issue’s end, the remaining passengers find an empty cab and temporary refuge while one of them is trapped in a cabin full of primordials.

Overall, a nail biter of an issue which leaves you on the edge of your seat. The story by the creative team is action packed, well told, and smart. The art by the creative team complements the story well. Altogether, an exciting issue that sets up what looks to more than satisfy fans.

Story: Marysol Levant, Brian Phillipson, David Stephan
Art: Alex Cormack, Ashley Cormack
Story: 9.6 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Train 8: The Zombie Express #1

One of the best movies I have ever seen, because of its transcendence of concept and genre, was Snowpiercer. At first glance, the movie seemed to be one of those abstract films within the science fiction genre, that one would have to see a few times to understand the meaning. The most obvious and most used example is Inception which uses the well-researched science behind sleep and dreams to create an evocative celluloid classic. One my favorite movies, although many do not consider it a science fiction movie, is Adjustment Bureau which blends the genre with romance movies.

As affecting as these movies are, they are also very relevant in the message they deliver of the world today. This is the very reason science fiction is often considered protest fiction. In comics, we have seen over the last few years, this be even more prominent than any other medium. In Train 8: The Zombie Express, the reader gets embroiled in one such tale where an experiment goes wrong.

We are taken to the Genesis Research Unit in Seattle, Washington, where some scientists are trying to play with God where an experimental serum has caused violent outbreaks on its subjects. On the famous 8 train, which passengers from Seattle to Chicago, a few unknowing passengers, unexpectedly gets their day turned upside down, as one man got infected with the contagion created at Genesis. Rapidly, the virus starts affecting each passenger and turn them into primordial beings who feast on other humans. By issue’s end, the last remaining survivors suddenly realize that they are alone, and no help will be coming.

Overall, the issue is a pulse pounding debut issue that sets up what is soon to be a major motion picture and looks to be across between Resident Evil and The Mist. The story is explosive, fast paced, and highly entertaining. The art is gorgeous considering the subject matter. Altogether, it’s an excellent introduction to a world where playing with the course of evolution has dire consequences.

Story: Marysol Levant, Bryant Phillipson, and David Stephan
Art: Alex Cormack, Ashley Cormack

Story: 9.6 Art: 9.4 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

ComixTribe’s SINK Vol 1: Welcome to Glasgow is Up on Kickstarter

A forgotten East End district of a warped funhouse mirror vision of Glasgow, Scotland, Sinkhill is a hive of crooks, deviants and killers, and ordinary folk unfortunate enough to live among them.

If killer clowns prowl the streets in a blue van, a shovel-wielding vigilante in a fox mask serves brutal justice after dark, and the last bus home is always full of corpses, well, pal…

You must be in Sinkhill!

ComixTribe has been shaking things up when it comes to comics and comic marketing, especially with their series SINK. Not only have they been creating the usual printed issues (which have sold out and become collectors items) but they have also built buzz with free digital issues before the releases.

Now, the publisher is using Kickstarter to print the first volume of the series. A 160-page perfect bound collection, there’s a few different options to get the trade. Not only does it feature the comics but also pin-ups, galleries, bonus tales, and more… plus a soundtrack to listen to while you read!

As I said, they’re willing to do things differently and on their campaign you can find a download to the first issue for free and there’s also a “money back guarantee.”

If you’re a fan of horror, this is a must get from a company with a proven record for delivery.

The campaign runs through April 24th so don’t delay.

Three Days to Get Alex Cormack and Ryan K. Lindsay’s Stain the Seas Scarlet

Stain the Seas Scarlet is a sci-fi revent comic one-shot about resistance, shitty robots, and spacesuit noir from Alex Cormack and Ryan K. Lindsay.

Running until November 30, the Kickstarter is for the complete 22 page full color comic by artist Cormack and writer Lindsay as a digital release.

When Yelena’s planet has just about been successfully driven beneath the bootheel of the scumbag robot terraforming army, she throws a Hail Mary play. She takes the fight to them, via her diplomatic sell out sister, and she fails.

Or does she?

What comes next is a wild ride of spacesuit noir that’s my take on a 70s revenge flick with our wandering hero loose in space.

The comic is 100% made and ready to go so with the Kickstarter project already funded this is a comic you’re guaranteed to get for as little as $1.52.

ComixTribe’s Sink #2 Has Already Sold Out

ComixTribe is an indie publisher that has been one to watch when it comes to their marketing and their series regularly sell-out resulting in hard to find comics. The publisher has announced that Sink #2 has already sold out before it’s released November 8.

Sink #1 was released late last month and the comic solid out through the first printing (which caused retailers to reach out about exclusive special edition variants). The comic was released AFTER the order for Sink #2 were due, so, combine an under the radar comic with a first issue sell-out and a convoluted ordering system and you get a hot comic. Mix in a low print run and you’ve got a comic that’s often harder to find than the first.

Due to buzz from the first issue an a big advance order for Sink #2 has already come in and that’s that, the first printing is sold out. There’s still a few issues for retailers to order through their distributor though.

Long story short, if you want Sink #2 it’s best to hit up your comic shop and place one in your pull box.

Review: Sink #1

sink_001-coverAccording to the press release, Sink will be a series of standalone offbeat crime stories all linked by the location; that of Sinkhill, a forgotten East End district of a warped funhouse mirror vision of Glasgow, Scotland. Sinkhill is a hive of crooks, deviants and killers, and ordinary folk unfortunate enough to live among them.

There’s something refreshing about reading a standalone story that’s somewhat exhilarating, especially one such as this because you don’t know if you’re ever going to come across these characters again in another story, or if this is their one and only appearance, and that adds a genuine level of tension to the story in the series debut issue.

Sink #1 isn’t typically the kind of comic that I’d normally gravitate toward, but there was something about the setting that drew my attention, and I’m glad that it did.

John Lees crafts a fantastic story that touches on the twisted underbelly of Glasgow, with some characters that feel just like they walked off the streets (well in some cases, at least). Alex Cormack‘s art couldn’t be better suited to this comic, and his ability to bring forth the grim uneasiness that pervades Sinkhill’s streets really gets the comic under your skin.

If you’re looking for an excitingly fresh, albeit brutal, story then you need look no further than Sink. 

Story: John Lees Art & Colours: Alex Cormack
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

ComixTribe provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Review: Sink #1

sink_001-coverAccording to the press release, Sink will be a series of standalone offbeat crime stories all linked by the location; that of Sinkhill, a forgotten East End district of a warped funhouse mirror vision of Glasgow, Scotland. Sinkhill is a hive of crooks, deviants and killers, and ordinary folk unfortunate enough to live among them.

There’s something refreshing about reading a standalone story that’s somewhat exhilarating, especially one such as this because you don’t know if you’re ever going to come across these characters again in another story, or if this is their one and only appearance, and that adds a genuine level of tension to the story in the series debut issue.

Sink #1 isn’t typically the kind of comic that I’d normally gravitate toward, but there was something about the setting that drew my attention, and I’m glad that it did.

John Lees crafts a fantastic story that touches on the twisted underbelly of Glasgow, with some characters that feel just like they walked off the streets (well in some cases, at least). Alex Cormack‘s art couldn’t be better suited to this comic, and his ability to bring forth the grim uneasiness that pervades Sinkhill’s streets really gets the comic under your skin.

If you’re looking for an excitingly fresh, albeit brutal, story then you need look no further than Sink. 

Story: John Lees Art & Colours: Alex Cormack
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

ComixTribe provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

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