Review: Lazarus #17

lazarus017The most interesting part about this series is unquestionably the protagonist, Forever.  She is an unlikely protagonist, being the enforcer and head of security for her family, her family being the heads of massive corporations that have taken over as the heads of state in a future Earth.  Because of this the character is one of surprising differences.  She represents law and order, but it is the corrupt law and order that surround any one of the families in question.  At the same time she begins to question who she really is and sometimes she understands that her decisions are the resulting of choosing an action from a choice of several bad outcomes.  She is both hero and anti-hero and the reader is left to cheer for her, though often wondering why as her actions are sometimes unethical and what would even be considered to be criminal by our own present society.

“Will they or won’t they” is a common enough plot device among any any story with a romantic sub-plot, but the same mechanics of this plot trick is used often in other cases, as it has been used throughout this series.  As the reader mostly reads through the eyes of Forever, they are forced to make her same decisions and they are the ones which are forced into this same kind of “will she or won’t she?” scenario.  Will she really kill another innocent because she thinks that she needs to protect her family at all costs, or will she see that the people that are trying to subvert the family are doing so because it is a corrupt system and they are past desperation?  It is the same grey area for a hero which made Breaking Bad so popular, but as Forever finally meets up with one of the morally pure survivors of the Wyoming floods and the Denver lift, it would seem as though Forever might be finally on her path to redemption as she is also busy establishing Duluth as a city that can be won for her family in the ongoing war.

As this issue mostly focuses on other developments, it can be read as much of the rest of the series, engaging and compelling, if occasionally a fairly quick read built more on visuals than on text.  In this case though it would seem that the heroine of the series seems as though she might be ready to turn the corner on the question of whether she is really a hero or not, and it would seem that the answer will be answered as a yes soon enough.  In the meantime she must still focus on the goals of her family, but if there is going to be a change for the character, it would seem likely that this issue might be one of the major turning points.  As such while this issue maintains the same fast paced story as the previous ones, there is also a bit more intrigue to be mixed into the “edge of your seat” action.

Story: Greg Rucka Art: Michael Lark
Story: 8.7 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.7 Recommendation: Buy

Image provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.