Tag Archives: ivan plascencia

Nuclear Family banner ad

Get a First Look at DC’s Green Arrow 80th Anniversary 100-Page Spectacular!

On June 29, join DC in celebrating eight decades of emerald-clad swashbuckling, crime-fighting, and trick arrows of every kind when the Green Arrow 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1! Honoring Green Arrow and his allies across his 80-year history, from the Golden Age to now, the anniversary special includes 12 stories from some of DC’s most esteemed writers and artists who have contributed to the legacy of Oliver Queen. The title will also include 8-decade variant covers depicting the Emerald Archer through the ages.

This anthology not only features a “who’s – who” of comic book storytellers but also includes a unique and heartfelt tribute to the career of iconic DC and Green Arrow scribe Denny O’Neil“Tap, Tap, Tap” is a silent, wordless story from Denny O’Neil’s son Larry, Jorge Fornes, and Dave Stewart. The story chronicles the challenges and victories in Denny’s life both in and out of comics, from his childhood, raising a family, his stellar career as a writer, until his passing in 2020

Additional stories in this anthology include:

  • “The Disappearing Bandit”
    Written by Mariko Tamaki, Art by Javier Rodriguez
    It’s the Golden Age of Green Arrow and Speedy, brought to humorous and loving life by New York Times bestselling writer Mariko Tamaki (Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass) and acclaimed artist Javier Rodriguez (Batgirl: Year One). A lot of people attempt to affectionately show the silliness of the first age of super heroes, but few have done it as exceptionally as Mariko and Javier. Trick arrows for everyone!
  • “Punching Evil”
    Written by Tom Taylor, Art by Nicola Scott, Colors by Annette Kwok
    To become a more adept superhero and fighter, Green Arrow goes to train with the Golden Age superhero Wildcat at his gym. In true Wildcat fashion, he shows Ollie the hard way of what it takes to be your own hero. Tom Taylor (NightwingSuicide SquadInjustice) brings this story to life, with incredible artwork from Nicola Scott (Wonder Woman 75th Anniversary Special) and Annette Kwok (Joker/Harley: Criminal Sanity).
  • “Who Watches the Watchtower?”
    Written by Stephanie Phillips, Art by Chris Mooneyham, Colors by Mike Spicer
    The Green Arrow is left behind on the Justice League Satellite while the rest of the team goes on an important mission. Oliver is less than thrilled, and righteously indignant about the situation as usual until an alien armada invades the Satellite. Can Ollie stand alone against an alien onslaught before it reaches earth? Acclaimed writer Stephanie Phillips (Harley Quinn) captures that “Denny O’Neil Green Arrow”-voice, and this story is brought to life in gorgeous fashion by Christopher Mooneyham’s (Nightwing) retro/modern bronze age aesthetic.
  • “Out of the Shadows”
    Written and Art by Mike Grell, Colors by Lovern Kindzerski
    Legendary Green Arrow writer and artist Mike Grell return to the 1980’s era of The Longbow Hunters. The Green Arrow must team up with the legendary anti-hero Shado to stop a shipment of smuggled guns from making it into Seattle. Depicting The Emerald Archer as only he can, Grell will remind readers why his take on Ollie Queen is still a Green standard.
  • “The Arrow and the Song”
    Written by Ram V, Art by Christopher Mitten, Colors by Ivan Plascencia
    This tale is a beautiful meditation on the love between Green Arrow and Black Canary through the years and the found family that they’ve created. Writer Ram V (Catwoman) puts together this beautiful story of love and how life takes turns you don’t expect. Gloriously brought to life by the work of Christopher Mitten (Batman: Arkham Unhinged) and Ivan Plascencia (The Flash).
  • “One”
    Written by Brandon Thomas, Art by Jorge Corona, Colors by Matheus Lopes
    We go right back to the mid-90s with this story. Oliver Queen is dead. Connor Hawke is Green Arrow and he has to save the main Queen Industries building in Star City, the home of a business and family he was never part of, from a group of terrorists. Brought to you by Infinite Frontier and Future State writer Brandon Thomas (Future State: Aquaman) and amazingly drawn by Jorge Corona (We Are Robin).
  • “Green Man and Autumn Son”
    Written by Devin Grayson, Art by Max Fiumara
    Catwoman writer Devin Grayson and artist Max Fiumara shine a spotlight on Roy Harper, a.k.a Red Arrow, as he continues to manage his transition from “sidekick” to adult hero, along with single parenthood and his struggles with addiction and recovery.
  • “Star City Star”
    Written and Art by Phil Hester, Inks by Ande Parks, Colors by Trish Mulvihill
    Phil Hester drew nearly fifty issues of Green Arrow in the early 2000s, working with popular writers like Kevin Smith, Brad Meltzer, and Judd Winnick. Here, Phil synthesizes what was so great about his run into a tremendous eight-page story. Green Arrow tries to save a young girl named Star who has been kidnapped but has to run through a gauntlet of his greatest villains and allies to get to her. Including: Onomatopoeia, Speedy (Mia Dearden), Green Lantern (Hal Jordan), Black Canary, Arsenal, Connor Hawke, and Count Vertigo.
  • “Happy Anniversary”
    Written by Vita Ayala, Art by Laura Braga, Colors by Adriano Lucas
    This story focuses on the point in time where Green Arrow and Black Canary were married right before the New 52. On the day of their anniversary, the two are at each other’s throats and then Green Arrow gets kidnapped. Black Canary thinks the kidnapping is part of an anniversary game/present but quickly discovers that Green Arrow has REALLY been kidnapped by DEATHSTROKE and she has to save him. Vita Ayala (Future State: The Next Batman) writes a wonderful Mr. and Mrs. Smith-style action rom-com brought to life by Laura Braga (DC Comics Bombshells).
  • “The Sympathy of the Woods”
    Written by Ben Percy, Art by Otto Schmidt
    It’s the DC Rebirth Era, Green Arrow is feeling lost, the world is getting worse, and he doesn’t feel like he’s making enough of a difference. To cheer him up, Black Canary, Red Arrow (Emiko Queen), Diggle, and Henry Fyffe try to throw him a party to remind him of the beautiful community he’s built. But what starts as a celebration will become a rescue mission as Green Arrow is hunted down by the Dark Archer known as MERLYN. From DC talents Ben Percy (Nightwing) and Otto Schmidt (Harley Quinn).
  • “The Last Green Arrow Story”
    Written by Jeff Lemire, Art by Andrea Sorrentino, Colors by Jordie Bellaire
    The acclaimed Green Arrow creative team from the New 52, New York Times Bestselling author Jeff Lemire (Sweet Tooth)  and Andrea Sorrentino (Joker: Killer Smile) tell a transcendent final tale of Oliver Queen. In his older years, he requests to be left alone on the island where he was stranded so many decades ago. He’s gone there to connect to his own myth, his legacy, and to die in peace. But is it ever that simple for The Green Arrow?

The variant covers for this must-have collector’s item come from some of the most prolific artists in comics:

  • 1940’s Variant: Michael Cho
  • 1950’s Variant: Daniel Warren Johnson
  • 1960’s Variant: Neal Adams
  • 1970’s Variant: Derrick Chew
  • 1980’s Variant: Gary Frank
  • 1990’s Variant: Howard Porter
  • 2000’s Variant: Jen Bartel
  • 2010’s Variant: Simone Di Meo

Green Arrow 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1 arrives in participating comic book stores and digitally on Tuesday, June 29, 2020, for $9.99.

Review: Harley Quinn #2

Harley Quinn #2

DC Future State debuted a neon Gotham protected not by Batman but a fascist police force. In the current pages of the various Bat-family comics, we’re seeing the first steps toward that bright but dark future. Harley Quinn was an interesting take on the character focused on her degrees in counseling and PhD in psychology. This wasn’t the clownish Harley but one with quips and using all of her abilities. With it’s debut, Harley Quinn also showed us some steps towards that take with Harley in Gotham attempting to make amends for her crimes. Harley Quinn #2 continues her growth and delivers fun action and a foe for her to focus on.

Stephanie Phillips has knocked it out of the park with her take on the character. Balancing physicality, laughs, and smarts, this Harley Quinn is the complete package and not just a comedic foil to whomever she’s with. Harley Quinn #2 focuses a bit on her next steps and goals as she has decided she wants to help “The Clowns”. But, Hugo Strange has been “rehabilitated” to do the same, except he has city backing. And to Strange, Harley is the ultimate clown to rehabilitate.

Phillips gives us a fun Harley but one that’s about growth. She still acts out and doesn’t quite get how to act around people, but you can tell she wants to do good. That’s helped with her new sidekick Kevin. Kevin joined the clowns during the “Joker War” committing a crime and clearly wants to make amends. He delivers a character you actually want to hug. He’s the clay by which Harley can mold some good.

Phillips does an amazing job of balancing everything in the comic. We have Harley acting out with some hilarious results. There’s some solid action. Then there’s Kevin who makes you want to say “awe” and squeeze him. One issue in and I actually care for the character. And the comic pulls it all off with a sort of glee.

That’s helped by the art. Riley Rossmo delivers his kinetic style to the comic and it fits so well. Ivan Plascencia‘s colors pop as well. The combination is an impressive duo that nails down the character and tone of the series so well. There’s an energy about the comic that oozes from the page. Deron Bennett does an amazing job of packing in so much dialogue at times and with it keeps the chatter flowing and never once distracts from the art. This team, along with Phillips’ scripts, is an amazing one that’s firing on all cylinders.

Harley Quinn #2 is such a fantastic issue. It takes you on a ride and ranges of emotions. The fact I already love Kevin as a character and am cheering for him says everything. Sadly, I’m already attached so fully expect something terrible will happen. For now though, like Harley, I want him, and this comic, by my side.

Story: Stephanie Phillips Art: Riley Rossmo
Color: Ivan Plascencia Letterer: Deron Bennett
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: Harley Quinn #1

Harley Quinn #1

I’ve never been the biggest fan of Harley Quinn. I always felt the character was more interesting (for me) as part of an ensemble and not the center spotlight. I’m also not a fan of the more slapstick take, instead, I like the bit more goofy but very intelligent version that’s torn between different worlds. DC Future State delivered a take I hadn’t seen before, focused on her background as a psychiatrist as she took on Gotham’s worst. She still delivered laughs and a bit of manic self and very interesting insight into others. Harley Quinn #1 kicks off a new volume for the character set back in the present and a Harley who’s attempting to make amends for her past misdeeds.

Stephanie Phillips continues to guide Harley on her adventures giving us a character who’s still a bit out there but also one you can relate to a lot more. Harley has made mistakes, being the sidekick to a mass-murderer will do that. She now has a clean slate due to her work with the Suicide Squad and she wants to make things right. But where to start?

Phillips gives us a Harley with a mission. She has a clear focus now and it’s not random adventures. She wants to do the right thing but she’s not completely sure how to go about that. She’ll also need to face her past. It’s a solid direction for the character who has been an anti-hero for so long after her villain roots. Harley Quinn #1 has the character really making her “face” turn as she attempts to be a hero. And to me, that’s really interesting.

The debut issue has Batman who is rather skeptical of her abilities and intent. She has to now deal with not having income as a hero (this seems to be a popular topic lately). She’s starting over. Harley Quinn #1 is a woman who has finally broken away from an abusive relationship and life and is starting over. There’s a lot of potential in that. Most importantly, it entertains too.

Riley Rossmo helps deliver a kinetic punch to Phillips story through the art. It’s in Rossmo’s distinctive style with color by Ivan Plascencia and lettering by Deron Bennett. Rossmo’s art is perfect for the character as it captures the energy she has. It matches her energetic personality. The colors pop adding to it all and Bennett’s lettering often delivers the punchline in dialogue delivery. The trio come together to capture and create the feel of the comic and character. It’s a perfect mix of humor, action, and some more grounded emotional moments. You get the sense of the highs and lows of Harley throughout.

Harley Quinn #1 is the first Harley comic that has me hooked in to really check out what’s next. I like Phillips’ take on the character and mixed with the art, it has a fun punch to it all. It’s a fresh start for the character and is a solid jumping-on point for new readers and a pivot point for long-time fans.

Story: Stephanie Phillips Art: Riley Rossmo
Color: Ivan Plascencia Letterer: Deron Bennett
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.35 Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: Batman: Urban Legends #1

Batman: Urban Legends #1

As seen in The Lego Batman Movie, the Arkham video games, and the Batman comics of the 1990s and early 2000s, Batman’s strength is in the world and characters that he creates access to. Whether that’s his allies, villains, nooks and crannies of Gotham, or even police officers that he either works with or against, these personalities and settings are why I continue to return to the Batman side of the DC Universe. The creators of Batman: Urban Legends #1 understand this and flesh out different Batman-adjacent characters and even sometimes explore their relationship to the Dark Knight while also telling action, romance, and crime stories.

First up in this Gotham-themed anthology is the beginning of a six part Batman and Red Hood serial where Batman and his former protege-turned-killer vigilante (He’s switched to rubber bullets for the moment.) investigate a source of a hallucinatory street drug tackily called Cheerdrops. Writer Chip Zdarsky has a firm grasp on Jason Todd’s voice, including the darkness inside his soul and his hunger for justice, especially for Gotham’s beleaguered working class. Artists Eddy Barrows and Eber Ferreira and colorist Adriano Lucas nail the grit of the city with explosive linework and jagged layouts to go with a color palette that has had all the light sucked out of it. However, Excalibur’s Marcus To does the art in the flashbacks, which features brighter colors as well as simpler, cleaner lines with a more traditional superhero feel even though one of the scenes is set during “Under the Red Hood” when Jason Todd came back from the dead and started killing criminals.

“Batman and Red Hood” is also a study in contrasts in how two very different crime fighters deal with the same crisis. Batman is the World’s Greatest Detective and is super methodical with Barrows and Ferreria drawing him looking at the chemical makeup of Cheerdrops CSI-style, and his All-Star Superman-esque moment with a jumper is less feel-good and more evidence collection. On the other hand, Jason fights crime with his guts and heart and even admits in a wry line from Zdarsky that he’s not a great detective as he struggles to find a Cheerdrop stash house. However, he does find a boy named Tyler, and of course, Jason is great with kids and even lets him wear part of his mask while he looks for his dad in a dodgy part of Gotham. Zdarsky, Barrows, and Ferreira create something truly heartwarming between Jason Todd and Tyler.

There’s a throughline between this and the flashbacks where Batman (Portrayed as more of an action figure than man by To) struggles being a father figure to Jason, and Alfred does the job perfectly because he sees him as a human being and not an obstacle in his war on crime. Chip Zdarsky writes Alfred Pennyworth as the perfect parent to the Bat-family, who isn’t afraid to tell Batman that he’s full of shit and chooses compassion over a closed fist. And speaking of Batman, I love how Zdarsky doesn’t give him an inner monologue and depicts him more as a force of nature than a gun toting, broken man like Jason Todd, who agonizes over every decision and whose interaction with Tyler bring back memories of his mom who died of a drug overdose. Also, he’s not afraid to go a little dark, and Eddy Barrows and Eber Ferreira jagged layouts and emotional poses are along for the ride.

Batman: Urban Legends #1

The second story in Batman: Urban Legends #1 is an eight page Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy one-off from writer Stephanie Phillips, artist Laura Braga, and colorist Ivan Plascencia. Plascencia is this story’s secret weapon that shows the happy, hilarious times of Harley and Ivy’s first dates and the bleak current times for Harley as she has moved back to Gotham in her solo title and as a recurring character in Batman. Braga’s art is expressive and high energy for both the good times (Harley and Ivy smooching and snapping selfies) and bad times (A sudden bolt of lightning shattering their pictures), and she is a good fit for a story that isn’t centered around a heist or fight against a superhero, but a relationship. She and Phillips tap into the depth of feelings that Harley has for Ivy, and through some handy plant symbolism, they create hope for the relationship that has become very popular for fans in the past decade. “Harley and Ivy” is a nice, nearly slice of life oasis in the midst of the three other stories, which have more moving parts.

The third story in this comic is a 10 page “Outsiders” feature by Brandon Thomas, Max Dunbar, and Luis Guerrero starring Black Lightning, Katana, and an interesting take on Metamorpho. Thomas turns in kind of a mystery plot with the story starting with Black Lightning and an unseen Metamorpho in a Japanese prison before cutting to a bonkers, two page spread of a speedboat chase. Unlike the previous two stories in Batman: Urban Legends #1, Thomas and Dunbar go for a action over character focus, and honestly, I’m here for it. Dunbar uses arrows from their pursuers to act as eye-lines to follow the high speed chase, and he and Thomas have a clever moment or two up their sleeve, especially in regards to Metamorpho’s first appearance. The story isn’t particularly deep, but it has the vibe of a James Bond cold open with superpowers as Guerrero really makes Black Lightning’s abilities sizzle. Finally, Brandon Thomas’ plotting really kept me engaged with thinking about why characters were acting a certain way, and the the mini mystery box structure has me intrigued for the upcoming issue.

Batman: Urban Legends #1

Grifter is a character I didn’t really know a lot about except for some random comics like the New 52 Team 7 and JLA/WildCATs, but Matthew Rosenberg, Ryan Benjamin, and Antonio Fabela have made this anti-hero/rapscallion and his various pratfalls quite lovable and hilarious Batman: Urban Legends #1’s final story. Grifter is like that guy who bluffs at poker, but never has a good hand. And until maybe the penultimate page of the comic, he’s either screwing up or making a joke about it beginning with his mad rush towards supervillain fire during his Team 6 days with a lot of characters with familiar names from Wildstorm comics. (I’m not an expert on these characters, and you don’t have to be to enjoy the story.) Grifter uses his sense of humor to detract from his mediocre performance as Lucius Fox’s bodyguard or to avoid getting his ass kicked by Batman, but he also has a mystery side that is revealed when he has a “date” at one of Penguin’s bars. The mystery starts to really unfold towards the end of the comic, but Rosenberg hints at every time, he talks on a headset with what I assume is his older brother.

The comedy in “Grifter” isn’t just limited to Matthew Rosenberg’s delightfully smartass dialogue. It shows up a lot in Ryan Benjamin’s visuals, which range from G.I. Joe or Authority homages (When the superheroes clean up Team 6’s mess.) in the flashback to pure slapstick. For example, Grifter spills a drink at a party Lucius Fox is meeting a client at and spills a drink on a woman. In this situation, Benjamin doesn’t just show a simple facial expression, but throws in some growlixes and makes you know that she’s furious that the soaking wet guy in Converse and blue jeans is even in the same room with her. This playfulness extends to the fight between Batman and Grifter, which starts as a serious throwdown and ends up in a total cat and mouse situation with Grifter finally getting enough self-awareness to call it quits. However, their paths will cross, and you can tell that Batman understands he’s a wildcard with his connections to Lucius Fox, the criminal underworld, and probably those Wildstorm guys. All in all, Matthew Rosenberg, Ryan Benjamin, and Antonio Fabela turn in a hilarious action-comedy set in DC’s weirdest and (sometimes) dourest city and also slowly unveil what seems to be a master plan to merge the worlds of Wildstorm and Gotham.

Batman: Urban Legends #1 is an absolute win for the anthology format that DC Comics has been trying out with all of the four stories in the comic being entertaining and shedding light on a unique cast of characters. The longer stories that bookend the comic are especially noteworthy thanks to Chip Zdarsky’s pitch-perfect handle on the fascinating character of Jason Todd in “Batman and Red Hood” and Matthew Rosenberg and Ryan Benjamin’s skill with verbal and visual humor in “Grifter”.

Story: Chip Zdarsky, Stephanie Phillips, Brandon Thomas, Matthew Rosenberg
Art: Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira, Marcus To, Laura Braga, Max Dunbar, Ryan Benjamin
Colors: Adriano Lucas, Ivan Plascencia, Luis Guerrero, Antonio Fabela
Letters: Becca Carey, Deron Bennett, Steve Wands, Saida Temofonte
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.6 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: Tales From the Dark Multiverse: Batman: Hush

Tales from the Dark Multiverse Batman Hush

I love “what if” type comics. They’re simple in concept as they take a minor detail about a comic character and spin a whole new story and world out of it. It takes the familiar and makes something new and different. DC ComicsTales from the Dark Multiverse is a new take on that concept. Each one-shot takes a major storyline and delivers a new twist on them from the perspective of the Dark Multiverse. We know it’ll be a twisted tale, not necessarily tragic, but definitely, not a story that’ll leave up uplifted by the end. Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Batman: Hush gives us a new spin on the modern “classic,” Batman: Hush.

In this twisted tale, after the murder of Bruce’s parents, he goes off to live with his best friend, Tommy Elliot’s family. There is no Alfred Pennyworth to raise him. Instead, Bruce deals with the trauma of the murder of his parents devolving into madness that has him winding up in Arkham Asylum.

What’s impressive about Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Batman: Hush is how much of a world is fleshed out. Writer Phillip Kennedy Johnson could easily have focused on a story of revenge. Instead, there’s so much more. Gotham is an independent city-state with its own leadership and different place in the world. This isn’t the Gotham we normally know, instead, it’s a micro-state which allows for greater political intrigue and machinations. Johnson gives us much more than Batman just delivering justice but instead a Shakespearean tale of power, betrayal, and backstabbing action. There’s a lot of thought put into the world here and it’s the amount of detail that makes it really stand out.

Dexter Soy and Sergio Davila provide the art for the issue giving us a not quite horror style. The world and city feels like a land in battle. But, there’s a being that looms over it all, stalking and terrorizing individuals. Matt Santorelli provides the ink, Ivan Plascencia the color, and Troy Peteri the lettering. The style and the look of the world has detail about it that matches Johnson’s story.

The design of characters, locations, and vehicles have a well thought out aspect about them as if there was actual discussion about how this world operates. The haves are clearly delineated from the have nots in style and that extends to the detail of their location. The vehicles and weapons all have a utility about them as if they have an actual use in this world and it’s not just to look cool. Helicopter like transportation shuffles the wealthy across the skyline above those they rule below as an example.

Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Batman: Hush is a story of detail. It absolutely could have used more pages for that. The history and training about this version of Batman is a little thin though his motivation is clear. It’s something I’d like to see more of. There’s a lot packed in here though as Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Batman: Hush is a one-shot comic you can just pick up and enjoy and ponder so much about this intriguing spin on a familiar world.

Story: Phillip Kennedy Johnson Art: Dexter Soy, Sergio Davila
Ink: Matt Santorelli Color: Ivan Plascencia Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus Comics

Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal Robin King #1

Dark Nights: Death Metal Robin King #1

Dark Nights: Death Metal Robin King #1 is the latest Dark Nights: Death Metal one-shot that’s better than the main story. Focusing on the hit Robin King character, we learn more about his history and his relationship with The Batman Who Laughs.

The issue is an interesting one. We dive further into this twisted version of Bruce Wayne and “Batman”. Bruce is the one who killed his parents. From there goes on a mission to take on the adult heroes and their rules. There’s a brilliance to it all and we get to see why the Robin King is so good at what he does. Like Batman, he plans, and plans a lot. But, that’s both good and bad.

Writer Peter J. Tomasi handles the main story and adds depth to the breakout character. We get a vision and a mission and it’s one that’s consistent. With distrust of adults and rules and wanting the children to rise up, Robin King has a distrust of everyone. That includes The Batman Who Laughs. With that small detail, Tomasi gives us someone who can rival that character and likely will be a thorn in his side down the road. He’s more than just another evil Batman now. The crumbs for what’s to come are sprinkled here. Like the other one-shots, Dark Nights: Death Metal Robin King #1 is going to be a vital chapter in Dark Nights: Death Metal.

What Tomasi also does is deliver a chaotic glee about everything. Robin King has a kid-like excitement about the carnage and destruction. The attitude and actions make sense and are fun in a weird way. We see heroes murdered and there’s a bit of humor about it. That’s partially due to Tomasi’s writing but also the art by Riley Rossmo.

Rossmo is joined by Ivan Plascencia on color and Rob Leigh on lettering. Rossmo’s distinctive style with Plascencia’s colors creates a chaotic symphony of destruction visually. There’s an almost Looney Tunes feel about it all as Robin King’s joy explodes off the page. Rossmo’s character style adds to that and what could easily be gore and horror comes off as over the top humor. The glee with which the art presents Robin King too is somewhat infectious. Mixed with his at times child-like innocence, there’s a combination of a comic that’s reminiscent of 90s Bisley Lobo, a celebration of over the top destruction.

The issue also features a second story, “The Quiet Ones.” Featuring Signal, it has him going up against a new evil Batman we haven’t seen before. It too feels like a key moment that’ll have an impact down the road as the character “rights” his power and gets focus. Written by Tony Patrick with art by Daniel Sampere, color by Adriano Lucas, and lettering from Andworld Design, it’s another story that probably should be in the main comic but is relegated to this one-shot.

Dark Nights: Death Metal Robin King #1 is an odd comic like many of the one-shots. It’s likely an important part of the story filling in key moments not in the main comic. There’s clearly things here that’ll have an impact down the road and play in to what’s to come. But, at the same time, I’m not sure how you would add any of this to the main series. Even adding an issue, it’s too much of a side quest focus to keep the flow of that going. It’s also far more entertaining than what we’ve seen there. It’s focus on a few characters allows them to have depth delivering a comic that feels like it’s more about the character than the gimmick. That’s something that has plagued Dark Nights: Death Metal as a whole.

Dark Nights: Death Metal Robin King #1, like the other one-shots, stands out. If you want to learn more about Robin King, it’s out there but there’s just enough having to do with the main event, it also doesn’t stand on its own. Still, it’s an entertaining read that’s beyond insane and fun.

Story: Peter J. Tomasi, Tony Patrick Art: Riley Rossmo, Daniel Sampere
Color: Ivan Plascencia, Adriano Lucas Letterer: Rob Leigh, Andworld Design
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle Zeus Comics

Preview: Batman: Gotham Nights #13

Batman: Gotham Nights #13

Purchase

Nothing 2 See Here…” by Michael Grey, Carlos D’Anda, Luis Guerrero, and Ryan Christy.

Damian Wayne, the most powerful adversary crime has ever known, sits alone in the Batcave, twiddling his thumbs. Where is Batman? Why won’t he allow Robin to help? And most importantly, why has he left Damian to die of boredom?

Incorruptable Force” by Scott Bryan Wilson, Christopher Mooneyham, Ivan Plascencia, and DC Hopkins

Two-Face and Commissioner Gordon walk into a bar. When old grudges are resurrected and new plots are revealed, it’s a coin toss as to who walks out.

Batman: Gotham Nights #13

Shazam Debuts on DC Digital First as Harley Quinn Returns

DC’s Digital First launches a new series this week, Shazam: Lightning Strikes! The digital comic features a story by Dan Jurgens and Travis Moore about DC’s Big Red Cheese vs the gods of Egypt! Also of note this week is the return of Harley Quinn: Make ‘em Laugh with a story by Mark Russell and Laura Braga, and a new story in Superman: The Man of Tomorrow by Robert Venditti and Gleb Melkinov, giving fans even more choice of characters while expanding DC’s digital publishing line with original stories.

And watch DC’s digital space this week for the fifth chapter of DCeased: Hope at World’s End on Tuesday July 14, the seventh chapter of Batman: The Adventures Continue on Thursday July 16, and the fourth chapter of Harley Quinn: Black + White + Red on Friday July 17!

Monday July 13

Superman: Man of Tomorrow #11

Fight of a Lifetime” by Robert Venditti, Gleb Melkinov, Jordie Bellaire, and Clayton Cowles
Purchase

A powerful warrior from space arrives to Earth with the sole purpose of fighting the Man of Steel himself. Can Superman defeat Grikus, the champion of 10,000 battles?

Superman: The Man of Tomorrow #11

Tuesday July 14

Batman: Gotham Nights #13

Purchase

Nothing 2 See Here…” by Michael Grey, Carlos D’Anda, Luis Guerrero, and Ryan Christy.

Damian Wayne, the most powerful adversary crime has ever known, sits alone in the Batcave, twiddling his thumbs. Where is Batman? Why won’t he allow Robin to help? And most importantly, why has he left Damian to die of boredom?

Incorruptable Force” by Scott Bryan Wilson, Christopher Mooneyham, Ivan Plascencia, and DC Hopkins

Two-Face and Commissioner Gordon walk into a bar. When old grudges are resurrected and new plots are revealed, it’s a coin toss as to who walks out.

Batman: Gotham Nights #13

Wednesday July 15

Harley Quinn: Make ‘em Laugh #3

Escape Therapy” by Mark Russell, Laura Braga, Luis Guerrero, and Marshall Dillon
Purchase

Therapist extraordinaire Harley Quinn has been knocking it out of the park while helping Gotham’s criminal element navigate their psychological burdens. But not everyone shares her dedication to the mental health, and now Harley and her patients are stuck in Arkham Asylum with a robot who doesn’t make coffee and no way out!

Harley Quinn: Make ‘em Laugh #3

Thursday July 16

Titans: Titans Together #4

Career Day” by Phil Hester, Skott Koblish, John Kalisz, and Marshall Dillon
Purchase

When Wonder Girl, Starfire, and Raven give a presentation at a local high school, they’re confronted by a student with an ax to grind against the Titans. Raven is compelled to investigate, and they learn this teenager’s grievances might run deeper than they thought…

Titans: Titans Together #4

Friday July 17

Shazam: Lightning Strikes #1

Home Quest” by Dan Jurgens, Travis Moore, Nick Filardi, and Marshall Dillon. Cover by Evan “Doc” Shaner.

A class trip to an exhibit on Ancient Egypt goes all wrong when Billy tries to set a bragging classmate straight. Now they’ll have to work together to help a lost spirit find its way home!

Shazam: Lightning Strikes #1

This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

ComiXology Delivers Six New Digital Comics for You Today

Start off your Monday with six new digital comics on comiXology. Comics from DC, Magnetic, and Harlequin line the digital shelf. See them all here or check them out below!

First Things First

Written by Josie Metcalfe
Art by Miyako Fujiomi
Purchase

ER nurse Polly has her hands full with Nicholas, a doctor with a bad temper who works eighteen-hour shifts. The other nurses are afraid to go near him, so Polly visits his home for a talk. There she learns that after losing his wife and child in a car accident, Nicholas has thrown himself into work and is unable to move on from the grief. Polly is also carrying the wound of having lost a child, but on the anniversary of his loved ones’ deaths, she sees Nicholas doing something incredible!

First Things First

Knight On The Children’s Ward

Written by Carol Marinelli
Art by Yukako Midori
Purchase

Annika was born into the famous Kolovsky family, but she goes against her proud mother to become a nurse. Unable to receive financial assistance from home, she works night and day to pay her bills. One day, she’s surprised when her coworker Ross calls out to her. He’s her older brother’s friend, but they’ve never really talked before. Ross says he is worried about how tired she’s looked lately. The more she gets to know him, the more she falls for him. However, that just reminds Annika that, to Ross, she’s nothing but his friend’s little sister…

Knight On The Children's Ward

Beloved Virago

Written by Anne Ashley
Art by Riho Sachimi
Purchase

Beneath the skies of Paris in 1815, Katherine, an English-born young woman brimming with curiosity, awaits the arrival of a certain man. In order to expose the traitors who have been spilling her country’s secrets to France, she and her escort are to act together, masquerading as man and wife… But when her “husband” finally appears, Katherine is left at a loss for words. She is to play the wife of Major Daniel Ross, the brute who toyed with her best friend’s affections long ago and caused her no end of sorrow! Nevertheless, there is something alluring in Daniel’s gaze, inviting her into an adventure of romance yet unknown…

Beloved Virago

Orphans Vol. 3 #9: Cold as Space

Written by Roberto Recchioni
Art by Gigi Cavenago, Werther Dell’Edera
Cover by Massimo Carnevale
Purchase

Ringo and Juno hold Juric hostage as they flee from their former squad mates bent on their apprehension. Trapped on a locked-down starship, their only hope of taking their dark discover back to Earth is reaching the bridge and commandeering the controls. But that’s a whole lot of opposition to fight through between points A and B…

Orphans Vol. 3 #9: Cold as Space

Streamliner #5: Bye-bye Lisa Dora

Written by Fane
Art by Fane
Cover by Fane
Purchase

Race Day. The players are lined up and ready to go. But Billy Joe has been sabotaged minutes before the flag. Not like that’s ever stopped him in the past…

Streamliner #5: Bye-bye Lisa Dora

Superman: Man of Tomorrow #10

Written by Michael Moreci, Dave Wielgosz
Pencils Riley Rossmo, Thony Silas
Inks Riley Rossmo, Thony Silas
Colored by Ivan Plascencia, Wil Quintana
Purchase

Superman wakes up in chains and doesn’t know where he is. He’ll need to put the pieces together quickly if he’s to survive a brutal bout in this gladiator arena! The Main Man himself, Lobo, has come to Earth chasing a bounty, but Superman thinks Lobo is just hurting the little creature. Will Superman put a stop to Lobo, or does the alien have other plans?

Superman: Man of Tomorrow #10

This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Preview: Our Fighting Forces #1

Our Fighting Forces #1

House Call” by Priest, Christopher Mooneyham, Ivan Plascencia, and Willie Schubert (cover by Mikel Janín)

A cable news reporter embedded with a mysterious U.S. Army tactical unit tries to figure out which one of the team’s members is the immortal covert operative code-named the Unknown Soldier—and discovers much more than she bargained for!

Our Fighting Forces #1
Fish Kill side ad
« Older Entries