Tag Archives: the death of superman

Double-Double! The Death of Superman/Reign of the Supermen Double Feature!

Fans will soon have two options to watch the two-part DC Universe feature-length animated films, The Death of Superman and Reign of the Supermen TOGETHER!

First, Superman’s greatest adventure – his death and rebirth – will be unveiled in a special two-day exclusive theatrical event as Warner Bros. and DC join forces with Fathom Events for a double feature presentation of the previously released The Death of Superman and the first in-theater screening of the all-new Reign of the Supermen nationwide. The films will screen in more than 500 select movie theaters on Sunday, January 13 at 12:55 p.m. and Monday, January 14 at 8:00 p.m. (all local times) through Fathom’s Digital Broadcast Network (DBN). Tickets for The Death of Superman/ Reign of the SupermenDouble Feature can be purchased now and participating theater box offices. 

And later this year, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment will release the two movies as a single, full-length film with never-before-seen extended footage and a collectible item within the box set. Details will be released in the coming months.

Around the DC Universe: What to Check Out this Week in Movies, TV, and Comics!

Welcome back to Around the DC Universe Graphic Policy’s regular examination of the best and worst content on DC Entertainment’s premier streaming service.

Special Features

For the next few weeks DC Universe will be expanding their selection of issues from the original run of The New Teen Titans (1980) by Marv Wolfman and George Perez in the lead up to the premier of the Titans TV series (the first episode drops October 12th). DC is being cagey about how long issues will remain on the service so my recommendation is to read them as soon as possible because they are really good. Wolfman’s writing, while somewhat dated, holds up better than any of his contemporaries (with the possible exception of Chris Claremont) and Perez’s art improves with every issue reaching towards the pinnacle of his artistic achievement. It’s one of the best books of its era and a masterclass in the form that today’s creators can still draw upon for inspiration. Of particular note is issue #8 (“A Day in the Life”) a nice character piece that fleshes out the series three original creations (Starfire, Cyborg and Raven) and brings them closer to the characters we’ve come to know and love.

Movies and TV

Last week I warned you away from Superman: Doomsday and now I am happy to report that this year’s The Death of Superman is a much more successful adaptation of the original source material (which is still available to read). I love how the creators tied the escalation of the Lois and Clark romance into the fight between Superman and Doomsday. When Lois tells Clark that she loves him for the first time right before he sacrifices himself to save her and Metropolis I was moved to tears. The buildup to the climactic battle is great and the fight itself is even more epic than the one captured in the comics due to better staging and the fact that they used a much more iconic Justice League to really drive home how much of a threat Doomsday really was. The funeral sequence feels a little protracted but it is a nice coda and serves to really whet the appetite for Reign of the Supermen set to be released next year.

I know I’m a bit late to the party here but with the long awaited third season promised to drop soon I decided that it was past time to catch up on Young Justice. I really enjoy how they handle the broader DC Universe, pulling in odd little deep cuts here and there. They are fun easter eggs if you’re familiar with what’s being referenced but not completely confusing if you don’t.  If I have one criticism it’s that in the early episodes they tend to focus on obscure D-list villains in favor of more potent antagonists but this problem seems to be resolving about half way through the series with appearances by Lex Luthor, Ras Al Ghul and the Joker.  

Comics

Green Arrow is a really difficult character to get right. Thus far the best presentation I’ve seen is The CW’s Arrow  but Kevin Smith’s 2000 comic book run is a close second. In Quiver, Oliver Queen returns from the dead with amnesia. He believes that he’s just back from some hard travel with his friend Green Lantern Hal Jordan but years have passed and the world has changed. Regardless of what you may think of his movies Smith knows how to write comics well: his sense of action is flawless and his dialog pithy and on point. Phil Hester’s art is hit or miss for me but his simple sense of style works well here and is a nice complement to Smith’s wordplay. I can’t unequivocally recommend this book since there is some non-explicit sexual situations involving a young girl that some might find triggering (especially given recent events) and a supporting character who is pretending to be a fairly cringeworthy trope but if these are not deal breakers for you the storytelling is of a quality that it is worth reading. Available on DC Universe in Green Arrow (2000-) #1-10.

If you are looking for something a bit more modern there are several arcs available from Geoff Johns’ 2007 Action Comics run with Superman director Richard Donner. In Escape From Bizarro World (with artist Eric Powell) Superman must save Pa Kent from his imperfect clone and a planet full of his offspring (including a Bizarro Justice League). Braniac (with artist Gary Frank) tells the story of the first true confrontation between Superman and one of his arch foes, the evil alien mastermind from the planet Colu. While Johns’ brand of decompressed storytelling isn’t for everyone, this is a case where it works fairly well. It’s an interesting run as the writers seem to be intent on adding elements of both the pre-Crisis comics continuity and the Christopher Reeve Superman films into the stripped-down framework previously established by John Byrne in his 1987 reboot. These stories actually read better taken outside the context of the character’s broader continuity adrift  as they are adrift between major periods of the Superman canon. The tone of Braniac may also feel familiar to those who are following Mark Andreyko and Kevin Maguire’s current run on Supergirl making for interesting comparisons between the two. Available on DC Universe in Action Comics (1938-) #855-857 and #866-870.

Around the DC Universe: Week 2 – A Superman Focused Week

Welcome to Around the DC Universe, your weekly guide to the best comics and shows featured on DC Entertainment’s exclusive new streaming service.

Technical Issues

I begin this week with technical issues because after almost two weeks of playing with the app I have finally figured out how DC Universe deals with the release of new comics.

Most of the titles are part of the curated library, a selection of 2500 or so issues that will swap out quarterly (though I imagine that a few key issues like Action Comics #1 and Detective Comics #27 will remain in perpetuity). Special features will be added weekly for shorter runs usually of a week or two.

Special Features

Right now you have three weeks to check out the original Death and Return of Superman  in Action Comics (1938-), Adventures of Superman, Superman: The Man of Steel and Superman (1986). This epic event stands at the crossroads between marketing gimmick and heartfelt storytelling. The writers and artists involved have a deep and abiding affection for the Man of Steel that shines through the hype as they take him as low as a person can go and then bring him back. Superman’s supporting cast, one of the best in the history of comics, really gets a chance to shine in the absence of the series’ main character and there are several moments that still move me to tears. Unfortunately, as of this writing DC Universe is missing several key issues including Superman (1986) #78 and 79 which introduce the infamous Cyborg Superman. It’s possible to enjoy the story despite this gap but it is disappointing that DC could not be bothered to correct their mistake despite several queries on the community forums and at least one query to their customer service department which received no response. Even if you have read the story before be sure and check out Newstime: The Life and Death of Superman (1993). Originally published as a facsimile of a tribute magazine, this is a great artifact from within the DC Universe that offers some interesting perspectives and more than a few easter eggs and has  never, to my knowledge, been reprinted.

Movies and TV

Those who don’t have time to wade through all those comics might find themselves tempted two different animated versions available on the video streaming portion of DC Universe. Sadly the older of the two (Superman: Doomsday) is an inferior adaptation. The original story took up almost a year’s worth of four monthly titles so trying to condense it into a mere hour and forty five minutes is impossible. A lot of questionable creative choices were also made, including a Superman who is perfectly willing to engage in intimate relations with Lois Lane without telling her his secret identity. The generally mean characterization of many of the characters involved robs the feature of all of its poignancy. A double feature of Batman v Superman and Justice League does the original material more credit and is infinitely more preferable to this waste of good talent. I’ve yet to watch this year’s The Death of Superman but it’s on my agenda for next week.

On the other side of the Superman coin I’m surprised by how much I enjoy watching George Reeves in the Adventures of Superman TV show. While it’s very much a product of its time, it’s still incredibly fun to watch in small doses. Reeves is inherently likable as both Superman and Clark Kent has the inherent likeability and the supporting cast is also top notch. There are some interesting wrinkles added to the legend. I particularly liked watching Pa Kent risking his life to save Baby Kal El from the blazing wreckage of his rocket after it crashes to work. The plots are much more down to Earth than we’re used to with Superman taking on smugglers and bank robbers instead of alien despots and mad scientists.  That’s not a bad thing however as it reminds us that Superman was once a much more relatable, down to Earth character, not so much in his power level but in his concerns. It’s fun to revisit that simpler time even if only for a couple of episodes.

Comics

The Legion of Superheroes is one  of my all time favorite teams. The long running drama of a club of teenage heroes in the far future is in turns both goofy and profound with a tangled continuity that makes the X-Men look simple by comparison. If you’ve never experienced the Legion many of their earliest stories are currently available in Adventure Comics. DC Universe has taken a greatest hits sort of approach with some of the best stories from the first few years of the Legion’s run, many of them by science fiction legend Ed Hamilton. Reading the stories as they’re presented does sacrifice the development of on a rich and compelling continuity but these high points, including the death of one of the major players in Legion history, is well worth your time if you’re a fan of DC’s silver age. Adventure Comics was an anthology title that also featured stories about of other heroes and they are included here as as well. Fans of Aquaman  should take note of superior stories in the first two issues with art by the great Ramona Fradon, one of the first women to draw a superhero comic. Available on DC Universe in Adventure Comics (1938-) #247, 267, 300, 304, 306, 310, 312, and 316.

The Death of Superman Clip – Wonder Woman vs. Doomsday

Wonder Woman goes head-to-head with Doomsday in the streets of Metropolis in this new clip from The Death of Superman.

The Death of Superman ultimately finds Superman in a fight to the finish when the Man of Steel becomes the only hero who can stand in the way of the monstrous creature Doomsday and his unstoppable rampage of destruction.

As the inaugural film in the DC Universe Movies series, Superman Doomsday told an abridged version of The Death of Superman, DC Comics’ landmark 1992-93 comic phenomenon. But with a runtime of 75 minutes, the film focused on a core, singular storyline. The new, animated The Death of Superman, the first of a two-part film experience that will conclude with Reign of the Supermen in early 2019, restores many of the moments and characters that fans hold dear to their hearts.

The all-star cast is led by Jerry O’Connell (Crossing Jordan, Stand By Me), Rebecca Romijn (X-Men, The Librarians) and Rainn Wilson (The Office) as the voices of Superman, Lois Lane and Lex Luthor, respectively. The potent trio is joined by the DC Universe Movies’ returning voices of the Justice League: Jason O’Mara (The Man in High Castle, Terra Nova) as Batman, Rosario Dawson (Sin City, Rent, Daredevil) as Wonder Woman, Shemar Moore (S.W.A.T., Criminal Minds) as Cyborg, Nathan Fillion (Castle, ABC’s upcoming The Rookie) as Green Lantern/Hal Jordan, Matt Lanter (Timeless) as Aquaman, and Christopher Gorham (Covert Affairs, Ugly Betty) as The Flash.

The film is out on digital now and Ultra Blu-ray Combo Pack, Blu-ray Combo Pack, and DVD on August 7th.

The Death of Superman Animated Movie Gets a Comic Tie-In

DC Comics has launched The Death of Superman: Part 1, a new Digital First series following the digital release of The Death of Superman animated film from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment. The new series comes from famed Superman writer Louise “Weezie” Simonson, and kicking off art duties is superstar Wonder Woman ’77 artist, Cat Staggs, followed in subsequent chapters by Joel Ojeda, Laura Braga and more. Readers can download the first chapter now.

What is it like to be Superman—when the events of a day can be completed in a matter of minutes? This series begins as readers follow the hours that lead to the Man of Steel’s face-off with Doomsday—the alien that is destined to destroy him. He’ll save an astronaut when a meteor crashes into their shuttle, he’ll save Major Lane when his experiment-gone-wrong Metallo comes for revenge, plus he’ll save time for a visit when Ma and Pa come to Metropolis to meet his new lady, Lois—and that’s just the beginning. The series contains additional chapters following the path of the Daily Planet’s Jimmy Olsen in those fateful hours, plus the aftermath of the loss of a true hero.

These are never-before-told stories of what happened before, during, and after the conflict with Doomsday that cost Superman his life. Each story will explore what power means—for someone like Superman who wields it for the good of humanity, or the villains who use it to further their own selfish agendas.

The Death of Superman: Part 1 is a 12-part series, released weekly. The first chapter is available for download now via the DC Comics App,readdc.com,  iBooks, comiXology.com, Google Play, Kindle Store and Nook Store.

The Death of Superman is the inaugural film in the DC Universe Movies series, produced by Warner Bros. Animation and DC Entertainment. The film finds Superman in a fight to the finish against his ultimate foe, Doomsday, as he unleashes unstoppable rampage and destruction on Earth. The animated film was released digitally by Warner Bros. Home Entertainment on July 24, 2018, and will be released on Ultra HD Blu-ray Combo Pack, Blu-ray Combo Pack and DVD August 7, 2018.

The Death of Superman Gets a Trailer

The Man of Steel meets his ultimate match when Doomsday comes to Earth – hell bent on destroying everything and everyone in his path, including the Justice League – in the all-new, action-packed The Death of Superman, part of the popular series of DC Universe Movies. Produced by Warner Bros. Animation and DC Entertainment, the feature-length animated film arrives from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment on Digital starting July 24, 2018, and on Ultra HD Blu-ray™ Combo Pack, Blu-ray™ Combo Pack and DVD August 7, 2018.

The Death of Superman will be available on Ultra HD Blu-ray™ Combo Pack ($39.99 SRP), Blu-ray™ Deluxe Gift Set ($39.99 SRP), Blu-ray™ Combo Pack ($24.98 SRP) and DVD ($19.98 SRP), as well as on Digital ($19.99 HD, $14.99 SD). The Ultra HD Blu-ray™ Combo Pack features an Ultra HD Blu-ray™ disc in 4K with HDR and a Blu-ray™ disc featuring the film; the Blu-ray™ Deluxe Gift Set includes a collectible Superman figurine; the Blu-ray™ Combo Pack features the film in hi-definition; and the DVD features the movie in standard definition. The Ultra HD Blu-ray™ and Blu-ray Combo Pack™ include a digital version of the film.

The Death of Superman ultimately finds Superman in a fight to the finish when the Man of Steel becomes the only hero who can stand in the way of the monstrous creature Doomsday and his unstoppable rampage of destruction.

As the inaugural film in the DC Universe Movies series, Superman Doomsday told an abridged version of “The Death Of Superman,” DC Comics’ landmark 1992-93 comic phenomenon. But with a runtime of 75 minutes, the film focused on a core, singular storyline. The new, animated The Death of Superman, the first of a two-part film experience that will conclude with Reign of the Supermen in early 2019, restores many of the moments and characters that fans hold dear to their hearts.

The all-star cast is led by Jerry O’Connell (Crossing Jordan, Stand By Me), Rebecca Romijn (X-Men, The Librarians) and Rainn Wilson (The Office) as the voices of Superman, Lois Lane and Lex Luthor, respectively. The potent trio is joined by the DC Universe Movies’ returning voices of the Justice League: Jason O’Mara (The Man in High Castle, Terra Nova) as Batman, Rosario Dawson (Sin City, Rent, Daredevil) as Wonder Woman, Shemar Moore (S.W.A.T., Criminal Minds) as Cyborg, Nathan Fillion (Castle, ABC’s upcoming The Rookie) as Green Lantern/Hal Jordan, Matt Lanter (Timeless) as Aquaman, and Christopher Gorham (Covert Affairs, Ugly Betty) as The Flash.

The cast also features Nyambi Nyambi (Mike & Molly, The Good Fight) as Martian Manhunter, Rocky Carroll (NCIS) as Silas Stone, Patrick Fabian (Better Call Saul) as Hank Henshaw, Toks Olagundoye (Castle) as Cat Grant, Max Mittleman (Justice League Action) as Jimmy Olsen, Charles Halford (Constantine) as Bibbo Bibbowski, Jonathan Adams (Last Man Standing) as the Mayor, Paul Eiding (Ben 10: Omniverse) as Pa Kent, Jennifer Hale (Green Lantern: The Animated Series) as Ma Kent, Trevor Devall (Suicide Squad: Hell To Pay) as Dabney Donovan & Bruno Mannheim, Rick Pasqualone (Mafia II & Mafia III video games) as Turpin, Amanda Troop (Batman Unlimited: Animal Instincts) as Sawyer, Erica Luttrell (Salvation) as Mercy, and Cress Williams (Black Lightning) as John Henry Irons.

Producer Sam Liu (Gotham by Gaslight, Teen Titans: The Judas Contract) co-directs The Death of Superman with Jake Castorena (Justice League Action) from a script by New York Times best-selling author Peter J. Tomasi (Green Lantern: Emerald Knights). Executive Producers are Sam Register and James Tucker (Suicide Squad: Hell To Pay, Justice League Dark).

Unboxing: DC Icons: The Death of Superman Doomsday & Superman Deluxe Action Figure Set

DC Collectibles brings the icon battle to life in plastic with the new DC Icons: Superman & Doomsday 2-pack set. From the classic Superman tale the set features both Superman and Doomsday action figures in a unique rubble base. Also included is a torn Superman cape, multiple fists, an alternative Superman head, sound effects, and more.

We open up and show off this nostalgic set which is to be released this December.

You can order yours now:
Amazon or TFAW

 

 

DC Collectibles provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Around the Tubes

So did you go to the comic shop yesterday? What’d folks get?

Around the Tubes

ComicsAlliance – Israeli Ambassador to Japan Persuades ‘Mein Kampf’ Manga Publisher to Create Bible AdaptationsInteresting.

IGN – Rob Liefeld Wants to Draw Your ComicPretty cool.

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

The Beat – The Death of Superman

IGN – Justice League of America #1

What Culture – Lobster Johnson, Volume 2: The Burning Hand

Talking Comics – Saga #10

Talking Comics – The Strain

The Beat – Revisiting the New 52 TPBs (Action Comics, Frankenstein, Hawkman, Justice League, OMAC, Suicide Squad)