Tag Archives: jack kirby

Celebrate the Fantastic Four with a Poster Featuring Classic Jack Kirby Artwork

This August, Marvel invites you to join Johnny, Ben, Sue and Reed in their much-anticipated return to comics, featuring an all-new story from Dan Slott, Sara Pichelli, and Esad Ribic!

And to celebrate the return of the first family, Marvel is excited to reveal a special Fantastic Four poster featuring classic artwork by Jack Kirby, which will be available to readers this August.

Be sure to pick up Fantastic Four #1 on August 8th, and stay tuned for announcements about Fantastic Four’s release, upcoming incentives, and more!

Preview: Fighting American #3 (of 4)

FIGHTING AMERICAN #3 (of 4)

Writer: Gordon Rennie
Artist: Andie Tong
Color: Tracy Bailey
Letterer: Simon Bowland
Cover A: Andie Tong
Cover B: Jack Kirby
Publisher: Titan Comics
FC, $3.99, On sale: May 2, 2018

The critically-acclaimed series returns with a brand-new story featuring Fighting American and Speedboy!

Preview: The Prisoner #1

The Prisoner #1

Writer: Peter Milligan
Artist: Colin Lorimer
Cover A: Mike Allred. Colors By Laura Allred
Cover B: Photo cover
Cover C: Jack Kirby, Mike Royer. Colors by Mike Allred
Cover D: Colin Lorimer. Colors by Joana Lafluente
Cover E: John McCrea. Colors by Michael Spicer
Cover F: Mike Allred Black and White Variant.
Publisher: Titan Comics

FC, 32pp, $3.99, On sale: April 25, 2018

In the 21st Century, the global currency is no longer oil or gold but information. And he who possesses it possesses the world. There is one place on the planet where the most valuable information is mined, a place that prides itself on ‘mental fracking’, promising to extract any secret from any individual using any means possible.

It is perhaps the intelligence community’s darkest secret, aligned to no one political system or state, an autonomous institute, free of state manipulation. The identity of its controller, the mysterious Number One, is unknown. It is a place so secret, some believe it to be a myth. It is The Village.

Now read on…

Preview: Fighting American: The Ties That Bind #2

FIGHTING AMERICAN: THE TIES THAT BIND #2

Writer: Gordon Rennie
Artist: Andie Tong
Colorist: Tracy Bailey
Letterer: Simon Bowland
Editor: David Leach
Cover A: Andie Tong
Cover B: Jack Kirby
Publisher: Titan Comics
FC, 32pp, $3.99, On sale: April 4, 2018

The critically-acclaimed series returns with a brand-new story featuring Fighting American and Speedboy!

Ava DuVernary is Directing “The New Gods” for Warner Bros.

Deadline is reporting that director Ava DuVernay is closing a deal and will dive into Jack Kirby‘s creations with The New Gods for Warner Bros.

This is another big budget film for the director whose film A Wrinkle in Time opened this past weekend. That film was released by Buena Vista, a division of Disney, a competitor to Warner Bros. in both film and comics.

This is the second female director Warner Bros/DC has brought onto a project. Patty Jenkins was the first and her Wonder Woman went on to gross over $800 million worldwide.

It is believed this will be a freestanding film not connected to the DC Cinematic Universe. That move is interesting as Steppenwolf was the villain of Justice League and Darkseid has been looming over that film universe.

The director is a fan of Kirby’s creations stating that her favorite superhero is Big Barda.

Kirby’s creations debuted in the early 70s and involves two warring factions, those of New Genesis and those of Apokolips. Think of it as a combination of a lot of different mythological backgrounds. Known as the “Fourth World,” the New Gods can currently be seen in Mister Miracle written by Tom King with art by Mitch Gerads as well as appearing in various series of DC Comics.

This is a massive sandbox to play in and it’ll be interesting to see where it all goes from here.

People’s History of the Marvel Universe, Week 12: The Mutant Metaphor (Part IV)

Face front, true believers!

In the last entry in this series, I was intending to write about Chris Claremont’s stamp on the mutant metaphor. However, recently I got bitten by a (non-radioactive) different idea and so instead I want to talk about another aspect of the mutant metaphor, a metaphor-within-a-metaphor, one that’s cropped up in many different eras of X-Men history: the comparison of humans and mutants to Neanderthals and Cro-Magnons.

Read more

Preview: Fighting America: The Ties That Bind #1

FIGHTING AMERICAN: THE TIES THAT BIND #1

Writer: Gordon Rennie
Artist: Andie Tong
Color: Tracy Baily
Letterer: Simon Bowland
Editor: David Leach
Cover A: Jerry Ordway
Cover B: Jack Kirby
Cover C: Andie Tong
Publisher: Titan Comics
FC, 32pp, $3.99
On sale: March 7, 2018

In 1954, NELSON FLAGG took part in an experimental US Military procedure that saw his mind transferred into the enhanced and revitalized body of his dead brother, JOHNNY FLAGG, to become America’s first and only superhero, FIGHTING AMERICAN!

63 years later, FIGHTING AMERICAN and his sidekick, SPEEDBOY, have found themselves marooned in the 21st Century.

With MADAME CHAOS now safely behind bars, FA and SB have begun the mammoth task of tracking down all of the stolen PROFESSOR DYLE TWISTER tech that she sold on the Dark Web to every whack-job, fanatic, terrorist and weirdo she could find.

Meanwhile, one of FA’s old 1950s villains (sent through time by CHAOS LAD), the notorious DOUBLE HEADER, is now the head of the FBI and starting to make life difficult for our two-fisted man of action.

Review: Black Panther Vol. 1 A Nation Under Our Feet

Black Panther is coming to theaters and we’re reviewing each trade paperback volume of the current ongoing series from Marvel! We’re starting with the first, “A Nation Under Our Feet.”

Black Panther Vol. 1 A Nation Under Our Feet collects issues #1-4 by Ta-Nehisi Coates, Brian Stelfreeze, and Laura Martin. It also features Fantastic Four (1961) #52 by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.

Get your copy. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Titan Comics’ Fighting American Gets a Trailer

April 17 sees the release of Fighting American Volume 1: Brave New World – the return of Joe Simon and Jack Kirby‘s (creators of Captain America) legendary two-fisted superhero, originally created back in 1954! Join Fighting American and Speedboy in this brand-new graphic novel collection as they navigate the dangers and wonders of the modern world.

Described by Superman’s Jerry Ordway as “fun!”, this graphic novel is a direct continuation of Simon & Kirby’s All-American classic! Written by Gordon Rennie, with artwork by Duke Mighten, PC De La Fuente, and colors by Tracey Bailey.

Fighting American, the ultimate icon of truth, justice and the American Way, and his young teenage sidekick, Speedboy, have found themselves marooned in the 21st Century whilst on the trail of a gang of villains plucked from their past by a mysterious villainess known only as Lady Chaos… Now, there’s nothing left for them to do but to bring some much-needed two-fisted justice and home-spun 1950s grit to a modern, media-obsessed, cynical world.

To celebrate this hotly anticipated graphic novel, Titan has released a brand-new trailer!

Underrated: Books On The History Of Comics.

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week:  Books On The History Of Comics.



Last week we looked at why comic book history was Underrated. This week, we’ll look at some books that, should you be interested, will help shed some light on the stories behind the stories.

Marvel Comics: The Untold Story by Sean Howe was published in 2012. Howe decided to write the book because the stories comic creators told in fanzine interview always seemed different from the official narrative. Starting with the comics published during the golden age, and the characters created by Jack Kirby, Joe Simon and Stan Lee, the book follows the publisher’s story to the new millennium up until the creation of the Marvel Cinematic Universe with upwards of 150 interviews conducted by the author.  GQ’s Joshua Rivera described the book as “one of the most comprehensive and well-researched accounts” of Marvel.

Bill The Boy Wonder written by Marc Tyler Nobleman with art by Ty Templeton. Presented as a childrens book, Bill The Boy Wonder tells the untold tale of Batman’s creation. By shining a light on who Bill Finger was, Nobleman’s extensive research led to Finger finally getting a byline credit whenever Batman appears. The book’s presentation is designed to allow as many people, of any age, to learn about Bill Finger – and it works.

Superheroes!: Capes, Cowls, and the Creation of Comic Book Culture by Laurence Maslon and Michael Kantor.  Assembled as a companion piece to the three part PBS documentary series Superheroes, this volume chronicles the effect of superheroes on American culture through the various mediums they appear in, and conversely the effect of America culture on superheroes. Featuring more than 500 full-color comic book panels, covers, sketches, photographs of both essential and rare artwork, Superheroes is an in-depth look at this powerful presence in pop culture.

Super Boys: The Amazing Adventures of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster – the Creators of Superman by Brad Ricca. Published in time for the 75th anniversary of the Man of Steel, comes the first comprehensive literary biography of Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel, the co-creators of Superman Brad Ricca’s Super Boys is the first ever full biography about Superman’s creators, and with more than ten years of research he made some interesting discoveries; the book reveals the first stories and pictures ever published by the Siegel and Shuster, where the first Superman story really came from, the template for Superman’s costume, and more than will be listed in this blurb

The Art of the Simon and Kirby Studio by Joe Simon, Mark Evanier, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby. At nearly four hundred pages, this historical look at the art produced by the Simon and Kirby studio is a must for any fan of either artist. The reproduced comics allow you to actually see the corrections done to the artwork such as drawings over areas of white-out, the faint lines used as reference for writing the text, portions of the panels being pasted over with bigger pieces of paper with bigger corrected drawings, the yellowing clear tape… The look into the creative process of these men is captivating.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Ultimate Visual History by Andrew Farago. Detailing the story of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from their humble beginnings in black-and-white comics to where they stand now as four of the most recognizable in animation and comics, this book features interviews with the characters creators and other key figures in the Turtle’s ascendancy. With reproduction artifacts from the Turtle’s history, including their debut, this hardcover book is worth looking into for any fan of the pizza loving teenagers.

 

This is by no means a definitive list of books to look up, but merely a selection to get you started, and there are obviously many, many more great books out there to delve into; far more than I have listed here (you’ll find a few purely from Amazon’s suggested list after looking these up). But that doesn’t mean we should stop learning about the medium’s history, eh?


Next week’s Underrated will look at some other aspect of the comic book world.

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